List of Major League Baseball single-game grand slam leaders

Tony Cloninger (left) is the only pitcher to hit two grand slams in one game, while Fernando Tatís (right) achieved the unprecedented feat of hitting two grand slams in the same inning in 1999.

Tony Cloninger 1962
Fernando Tatis

In baseball, a grand slam is a home run that is hit when all three bases are loaded, thereby scoring four runs—the most possible in one play.[1] Thirteen players have hit two grand slams in a single Major League Baseball (MLB) game to date, the most recent being Josh Willingham of the Washington Nationals on July 27, 2009.[2] No player has accomplished the feat more than once in his career and no player has ever hit more than two in a game. Tony Lazzeri was the first player to hit two grand slams in a single game, doing so for the New York Yankees against the Philadelphia Athletics on May 24, 1936.[3]

Every team which had a player hit two grand slams won their milestone games. These games have resulted in other single-game MLB records being set due to the extreme offensive performance. Lazzeri, for example, proceeded to hit a third home run in the game and finished with a total of eleven runs batted in, an American League record.[3][4] Fernando Tatís became the only player to hit two grand slams in the same inning, when he attained the milestone, slugging two in the third inning for the St. Louis Cardinals on April 23, 1999.[3][5] In achieving the feat, he also set a new major league record with eight runs batted in in a single inning.[6][7]

Tony Cloninger is the only pitcher to have accomplished the feat.[5] Bill Mueller hit his grand slams from both sides of the plate,[3][8] while Jim Northrup hit his grand slams on consecutive pitches received in the fifth and sixth innings.[9] Nomar Garciaparra is the sole player to achieve the feat at home, doing so at Fenway Park for the Boston Red Sox.[10] Cloninger is the only player who never hit a grand slam before or after his milestone game, while Robin Ventura—with 18 grand slams—hit more than any other player in this group. Frank Robinson is also a member of the 500 home run club.[11]

Of the nine players eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame who have hit two grand slams in a game, two have been elected, one on the first ballot. Players are eligible for the Hall of Fame if they have played in at least 10 MLB seasons, and have either been retired for five seasons or deceased for at least six months.[12] These requirements leave ineligible one player—Josh Willingham— who is living and has played in the past five seasons and one—Jim Tabor—who did not play in 10 seasons.[13]

Players

Josh Willingham swings cropped
Josh Willingham is the most recent player to hit two grand slams in one game, achieving the feat in 2009.
Key
Player Name of the player
Date Date of the two grand slam game
Team The player's team at the time of the game
Opposing team The team against whom the player hit two grand slams
Score Final score of the game, with the player's team score listed first
Career GS The number of grand slams the player hit in his MLB career
dagger Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame
MLB hitters with two grand slams in one game
Player Date Team Opposing team Score Career GS Ref(s)
Tony Lazzeridagger May 24, 1936 New York Yankees Philadelphia Athletics 25–2 8 [14][15]
Jim Tabor July 4, 1939 Boston Red Sox Philadelphia Athletics 18–12 7 [16]
Rudy York July 27, 1946 Boston Red Sox St. Louis Browns 13–6 12 [17]
Jim Gentile May 9, 1961 Baltimore Orioles Minnesota Twins 13–5 6 [18]
Tony Cloninger July 3, 1966 Atlanta Braves San Francisco Giants 17–3 2 [19]
Jim Northrup June 24, 1968 Detroit Tigers Cleveland Indians 14–3 8 [20]
Frank Robinsondagger June 26, 1970 Baltimore Orioles Washington Senators 12–2 8 [21][22]
Robin Ventura September 4, 1995 Chicago White Sox Texas Rangers 14–3 18 [23]
Chris Hoiles August 14, 1998 Baltimore Orioles Cleveland Indians 15–3 8 [24]
Fernando Tatís April 23, 1999 St. Louis Cardinals Los Angeles Dodgers 12–5 8 [25]
Nomar Garciaparra May 10, 1999 Boston Red Sox Seattle Mariners 12–4 7 [26]
Bill Mueller July 29, 2003 Boston Red Sox Texas Rangers 14–7 4 [27]
Josh Willingham July 27, 2009 Washington Nationals Milwaukee Brewers 14–6 6 [28]

References

General

  • "Two Grand Slams in One Game". Baseball-Almanac.com. Baseball Almanac. Retrieved July 10, 2012.
  • "Career Leaders for Grand Slams". Baseball-Almanac.com. Baseball Almanac. Retrieved July 10, 2012.

Specific

  1. ^ "Guide to baseball". BBC News. BBC. Retrieved July 4, 2012.
  2. ^ Ladson, Bill (July 28, 2009). "Two slams from Willingham vault Nats". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on March 10, 2011. Retrieved July 10, 2012.
  3. ^ a b c d Vincent, David (February 28, 2009). Home Run's Most Wanted™: The Top 10 Book of Monumental Dingers, Prodigious Swingers, and Everything Long-Ball. Potomac Books, Inc. pp. 13–16. ISBN 978-1-59797-192-8. Retrieved July 10, 2012.
  4. ^ Snyder, John (2004). The World Series' Most Wanted: The Top 10 Book of Championship Teams, Broken Dreams, and October Oddities. Potomac Books, Inc. p. 154. ISBN 1-5748-8728-9.
  5. ^ a b "Two grand slams in a game – Rare Feats". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Retrieved July 4, 2012.
  6. ^ "Tatis hits record two slams in one inning". The Register-Guard. Eugene. Associated Press. April 24, 1999. p. 3D. Retrieved November 14, 2012.
  7. ^ "Fantastic Fernando: Tatis hits two slams in one inning as Cards rout Dodgers". CNNSI.com. CNN. April 24, 1999. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  8. ^ Kurkjian, Tim (August 17, 2006). "The grand slam … unusual, yet fun". ESPN. ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved August 30, 2012. Bill Mueller...became the only player to hit grand slams from both sides of the plate in the same game.
  9. ^ Couch, Dick (June 25, 1968). "Northrup Ties Record Belting 2 Grand Slams". The Telegraph. p. 12. Retrieved August 10, 2012. [Northrup] drilled Fisher's first offering over the right field fence, then unloaded another first-pitch grand slam off southpaw Hill Rohr in the sixth...
  10. ^ Vincent, David; Stark, Jayson (March 31, 2007). Home Run: The Definitive History of Baseball's Ultimate Weapon. Potomac Books, Inc. p. 215. Retrieved August 30, 2012.
  11. ^ "Career Leaders & Records for Home Runs". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 4, 2012.
  12. ^ "Rules for Election". National Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  13. ^ "Jim Tabor Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 9, 2012.
  14. ^ "May 24, 1936 New York Yankees at Philadelphia Athletics Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. May 24, 1936. Retrieved July 10, 2012.
  15. ^ "Tony Lazzeri Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 10, 2012.
  16. ^ "July 4, 1939 Boston Red Sox at Philadelphia Athletics Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. July 4, 1939. Retrieved July 10, 2012.
  17. ^ "July 27, 1946 Boston Red Sox at St. Louis Browns Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. July 27, 1946. Retrieved July 10, 2012.
  18. ^ "May 9, 1961 Baltimore Orioles at Minnesota Twins Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. May 9, 1961. Retrieved July 10, 2012.
  19. ^ "July 3, 1966 Atlanta Braves at San Francisco Giants Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. July 3, 1966. Retrieved July 10, 2012.
  20. ^ "June 24, 1968 Detroit Tigers at Cleveland Indians Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. June 24, 1968. Retrieved July 10, 2012.
  21. ^ "June 26, 1970 Baltimore Orioles at Washington Senators Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. June 26, 1970. Retrieved July 10, 2012.
  22. ^ "Frank Robinson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 10, 2012.
  23. ^ "September 4, 1995 Chicago White Sox at Texas Rangers Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. September 4, 1995. Retrieved July 10, 2012.
  24. ^ "August 14, 1998 Baltimore Orioles at Cleveland Indians Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. August 14, 1998. Retrieved July 10, 2012.
  25. ^ "April 23, 1999 St. Louis Cardinals at Los Angeles Dodgers Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. April 23, 1999. Retrieved July 10, 2012.
  26. ^ "May 10, 1999 Seattle Mariners at Boston Red Sox Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. May 10, 1999. Retrieved July 10, 2012.
  27. ^ "July 29, 2003 Boston Red Sox at Texas Rangers Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. July 29, 2003. Retrieved July 10, 2012.
  28. ^ "July 27, 2009 Washington Nationals at Milwaukee Brewers Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. July 27, 2009. Retrieved July 10, 2012.
Bill Mueller

William Richard Mueller (; born March 17, 1971) is an American retired professional baseball third baseman who played in Major League Baseball (MLB). Mueller's MLB playing career was spent with the San Francisco Giants (1996–2000, 2002), Chicago Cubs (2001–2002), Boston Red Sox (2003–2005), and Los Angeles Dodgers (2006).

A number of Mueller's accomplishments came during the 2003 season, when he won the American League batting title and a Silver Slugger Award. A switch hitter, he became the only player in major league history to hit one grand slam from both sides of the plate in the same game on July 29, 2003. He was the starting third baseman for the Red Sox' 2004 World Series championship team that beat the Cardinals. Since his playing career, he has served in MLB as a front office assistant and hitting coach.

Chris Hoiles

Christopher Allen Hoiles (born March 20, 1965) is an American former professional baseball player. He played his entire Major League Baseball career as a catcher for the Baltimore Orioles from 1989 to 1998. Although his playing career was shortened by injuries, Hoiles was considered one of the best all-around catchers in Major League Baseball, performing well both offensively and defensively.

Fernando Tatís

Fernando Gabriel Tatís Sr. (born January 1, 1975) is a Dominican former professional baseball third baseman, and a current manager in Minor League Baseball. Over his 11-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career, he played for the Texas Rangers, St. Louis Cardinals, Montreal Expos, Baltimore Orioles, and the New York Mets. Tatis holds the major league record for RBIs in an inning, a feat that he achieved by hitting two grand slam home runs in one inning during a game on April 23, 1999, becoming the only player in MLB history ever to do so.

Frank Robinson

Frank Robinson (August 31, 1935 – February 7, 2019) was an American outfielder and manager in Major League Baseball who played for five teams from 1956 to 1976. The only player to be named Most Valuable Player (MVP) of both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), he was named the NL MVP after leading the Cincinnati Reds to the pennant in 1961 and was named the AL MVP in 1966 with the Baltimore Orioles after winning the Triple Crown; his 49 home runs that year tied for the most by any AL player between 1962 and 1989, and stood as a franchise record for 30 years. Robinson helped lead the Orioles to the first two World Series titles in franchise history in 1966 and 1970, and was named the Series MVP in 1966 after leading the Orioles to a four-game sweep of the Los Angeles Dodgers. In 1975, he became the first black manager in major league history.

A 14-time All-Star, Robinson batted .300 nine times, hit 30 home runs eleven times, and led his league in slugging four times and in runs scored three times. His 586 career home runs ranked fourth in major league history at the time of his retirement, and he ranked sixth in total bases (5,373) and extra-base hits (1,186), eighth in games played (2,808) and ninth in runs scored (1,829). His 2,943 career hits are the most since 1934 by any player who fell short of the 3,000-hit mark. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility in 1982.Robinson went on to manage the San Francisco Giants, the Baltimore Orioles, and the Montreal Expos/Washington Nationals. For most of the last two decades of his life, Robinson served in various executive positions for Major League Baseball, concluding his career as honorary President of the American League.

Grand slam (baseball)

In baseball, a grand slam is a home run hit with all three bases occupied by baserunners ("bases loaded"), thereby scoring four runs—the most possible in one play. According to The Dickson Baseball Dictionary, the term originated in the card game of contract bridge, in which a grand slam involves taking all the possible tricks. The word slam, by itself, usually is connected with a loud sound, particularly of a door being closed with excess force; thus, slamming the door on one's opponent(s), in addition to the bat slamming the ball into a home run.

Jim Northrup (baseball)

James Thomas Northrup (November 24, 1939 – June 8, 2011), nicknamed the "Silver Fox" due to his prematurely graying hair, was a Major League Baseball outfielder and left-handed batter who played for the Detroit Tigers (1964–74), Montreal Expos (1974) and Baltimore Orioles (1974–75).

List of Major League Baseball home run records

This is a list of some of the records relating to home runs hit in baseball games played in the Major Leagues. Some Major League records are sufficiently notable to have their own page, for example the single-season home run record, the progression of the lifetime home run record, and the members of the 500 home run club. A few other records are kept on separate pages, they are listed below.

In the tables below, players denoted in boldface are still actively contributing to the record noted, while (r) denotes a player's rookie season.

Robin Ventura

Robin Mark Ventura (born July 14, 1967) is an American former professional baseball third baseman and manager. Ventura played 16 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Chicago White Sox, New York Mets, New York Yankees and Los Angeles Dodgers. He was also the manager for the White Sox for five seasons. The White Sox selected Ventura with the tenth overall pick in the 1988 amateur draft from Oklahoma State University (OSU). He is a six-time Rawlings Gold Glove winner, two-time MLB All-Star selection and a National College Baseball Hall of Fame inductee.

While playing college baseball for the Cowboys at OSU, Ventura was a three-time All-American who authored a Division I-record 58-game hitting streak. In 1988, he won the Dick Howser Trophy and Golden Spikes Award and played for the gold medal-winning Olympic baseball team. In his MLB career, he hit 18 grand slams, ranking fifth all-time. In Game 5 of the 1999 National League Championship Series, Ventura hit the "Grand Slam Single" that won the game but did not actually become a home run because he was unable to complete the circuit around the base paths. Later in his playing career, cartilage and arthritis issues in his ankle hampered his abilities in the field. After the 2011 season, the White Sox hired him to be their manager, making him the 17th former White Sox player to manage the club.

Tony Cloninger

Tony Lee Cloninger (August 13, 1940 – July 24, 2018) was an American baseball player who played in Major League Baseball as a starting pitcher for the Milwaukee and Atlanta Braves (1961–68), the Cincinnati Reds (1968–71), and the St. Louis Cardinals (1972). He batted and threw right-handed.

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