List of Major League Baseball individual streaks

The following is a list of notable individual streaks achieved in Major League Baseball.

Hitting

Consecutive game records

Consecutive games with a hit

Consecutive games hitting a home run

Consecutive games reaching base

Consecutive games without a strikeout

Consecutive games with a strikeout

Consecutive games with two or more hits

Consecutive games with three or more hits

Consecutive quality starts (six or more innings and three or fewer earned runs) (since 1920)

Consecutive games with an RBI

Consecutive games scoring one or more runs

Consecutive games with a walk

Consecutive games with a triple

Consecutive pinch-hit appearances with a home run

Consecutive plate appearance records

Consecutive plate appearances reaching base (unofficial) (includes all possible ways of reaching base: base hit, walk, hit-by-pitch, error, fielder's choice, dropped third strike, catcher's interference and fielder's obstruction)

Consecutive plate appearances reaching base (official) (includes all possible ways of reaching base which raise a batter's OBP: base hit, walk, hit-by-pitch)

Consecutive plate appearances with a hit

Consecutive plate appearances with a walk

Consecutive season records

Consecutive seasons hitting .300 or better (50 or more games)

Consecutive seasons, 100 or more RBI

Consecutive seasons with 200 or more hits

Consecutive seasons with 150 or more hits

Consecutive seasons with 100 or more runs scored

Consecutive seasons with 50 or more home runs

  • 4 - Mark McGwire, Oakland Athletics and St. Louis Cardinals - 1996 through 1999
  • 4 - Sammy Sosa, Chicago Cubs - 1998 through 2001

Consecutive seasons with 40 or more home runs

  • 7Babe Ruth, New York Yankees – 1926 through 1932

Consecutive seasons with 30 or more home runs

Consecutive seasons with 40 or more doubles

Consecutive seasons with 20 or more triples

Consecutive seasons with 100 or more walks

Consecutive seasons with 600 or more at-bats

Consecutive seasons, .400 on-base percentage or better

Consecutive seasons, .600 slugging percentage or better (50 or more games)

  • 7Barry Bonds, San Francisco Giants – 1998 through 2004
  • 7Babe Ruth, New York Yankees – 1926 through 1932

Baserunning

Consecutive stolen bases without being caught stealing

Consecutive games with a stolen base

Consecutive seasons, 100 or more stolen bases

Consecutive seasons, 50 or more stolen bases

  • 12Lou Brock, St. Louis Cardinals – 1965 through 1976

Consecutive seasons, 40 or more stolen bases

Pitching

Consecutive game records

Consecutive games won

Consecutive games won within a single season

  • 19 (2 tied)
    • Tim Keefe, New York Giants – June 23 through August 10, 1888
    • Rube Marquard, New York Giants – April 11 through July 3, 1912 (streak began on Opening Day)

Consecutive complete games (since 1900)

Consecutive games without being relieved

  • 202 – Jack Taylor, Chicago Cubs and St. Louis Cardinals – June 20, 1901 through August 13, 1906 (187 starts, all complete games, and 15 relief appearances)

Consecutive shutouts

Consecutive no-hit games

Consecutive quality starts (six or more innings and three or fewer earned runs) (since 1920)

  • 26Bob Gibson, St. Louis Cardinals – September 12, 1967 – July 30, 1968
  • 26 - Jacob deGrom, New York Mets - May 18, 2018 - April 3, 2019

Consecutive games with 10 or more strikeouts

Consecutive saves converted

  • 84Éric Gagné, Los Angeles Dodgers – August 28, 2002 through July 5, 2004 (record set over three seasons)

Consecutive team games with a save

Consecutive team games with a relief appearance

Consecutive relief appearances with one or more strikeouts

  • 49Aroldis Chapman, Cincinnati Reds – August 21, 2013 through August 13, 2014 (record set over two seasons)


Consecutive relief appearances to start a season with one or more strikeouts

  • 45Corey Knebel, Milwaukee Brewers – April 3, 2017 through July 15, 2017

Consecutive relief appearances without allowing an earned run

Consecutive innings records

Consecutive scoreless innings pitched

  • 59Orel Hershiser, Los Angeles Dodgers – August 30, 1988 through September 28, 1988. (does not include 8 scoreless innings pitched in Game 1 of the 1988 NLCS or 2/3 scoreless innings pitched on April 5, 1989 to open the next season)

Consecutive hitless innings pitched

Consecutive perfect innings pitched

  • 15.1Yusmeiro Petit, San Francisco Giants – July 22 through August 28, 2014 (as starting and relief pitcher over 8 games, 1st and 8th games as starting pitcher and 2nd through 7th games as a relief pitcher)
  • 15.0Mark Buehrle, Chicago White Sox – July 18 through July 28, 2009 (as starting pitcher, included one perfect game)

Consecutive innings pitched without allowing a walk

Consecutive innings pitched without allowing a home run (modern era)

Consecutive innings pitched without allowing a home run (dead-ball era)

Consecutive batters faced with a strikeout

Consecutive strikes thrown (since pitch-by-pitch recordkeeping introduced in 1988; includes foul balls and balls-in-play)

Consecutive scoreless innings pitched to start a Major League career

Consecutive season records

Consecutive seasons, 30 or more wins

Consecutive seasons, 20 or more wins

Consecutive seasons, 10 or more wins

Consecutive seasons, 300 or more strikeouts

Consecutive seasons, 200 or more strikeouts

Consecutive seasons winning Triple Crown (lowest ERA, most wins, and most strikeouts in league - starting pitchers only)

Consecutive Opening Day starts

Consecutive seasons, 50 or more saves

  • 2 (2 tied)

Consecutive seasons, 40 or more saves

Consecutive seasons, 30 or more saves

Fielding

The nature and demands of each position differ significantly, thus the records are separated by position. The streaks listed below are only relative to a player's fielding chances while playing the listed position. Errors made at other positions would not disrupt the streak listed.

Consecutive fielding chances at each position without an error

Source for figures through 2007: The Elias Book of Baseball Records, 2008.

Games played

Consecutive games played

Consecutive innings played (non-pitcher)

  • 8,243 – Cal Ripken, Jr., Baltimore Orioles – June 5, 1982 through September 14, 1987 (record set over 903 games)

Consecutive seasons played

Consecutive seasons played with one team

Consecutive seasons played with different or multiple teams (includes off-season and mid-season changes)

Consecutive seasons with a playoff appearance

Awards

Consecutive MVP Awards

Consecutive Cy Young Awards

Consecutive Gold Glove Awards

Consecutive Silver Slugger Awards (award first attributed in 1980)

Consecutive Hank Aaron Awards (award first attributed in 1999; fan voting first included in 2003)

Consecutive Edgar Martínez Awards (award first attributed in 1973, originally called the Outstanding Designated Hitter Award)

Consecutive Rolaids Relief Man of the Year Awards (award first attributed in 1976, discontinued after 2012)

Consecutive MLB Player of the Month Awards (award first attributed in 1958)

Consecutive MLB Pitcher of the Month Awards (award first attributed in 1975)

Consecutive MLB Rookie of the Month Awards (award first attributed in 2001)

Consecutive All-Star Game appearances

See also

References

  1. ^ "Clarifying Some of the Records*". Society for American Baseball Research. Archived from the original on August 4, 2011.
  2. ^ Peticca, Mike (July 27, 2011). "No-hitters: Did you ever attend a record-book type major league game? Tell us your memories". The Plain Dealer. Archived from the original on August 4, 2011.
  3. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/ANA/ANA201204180.shtml
  4. ^ Simon, Mark (January 11, 2011). "Does HOF await Trevor Hoffman?". ESPN.com. Retrieved March 3, 2011. Only three pitchers have had streaks of four straight seasons with at least 40 saves. Hoffman did it not once, but twice.
  5. ^ Carig, Marc (August 14, 2011). "The Yankees This Week: Mariano Rivera drawing skepticism". The Star-Ledger. Archived from the original on August 17, 2011.
  6. ^ "M's Kotchman sets mark for errorless chances". cnnsi.com. Retrieved 2010-06-03.
  7. ^ "Polanco's errorless streak ends". redsox.com. Retrieved 2008-04-08.

External links

Bill Fischer (baseball)

William Charles Fischer (October 11, 1930 – October 30, 2018) was an American professional baseball pitcher who played in Major League Baseball from 1956 to 1964 for the Chicago White Sox, Detroit Tigers, Washington Senators, Kansas City Athletics and Minnesota Twins. He later was a longtime pitching coach at the major and minor league levels. He stood 6' (183 cm) tall, weighed 190 pounds (86 kg) and threw and batted right-handed. He was born in Wausau, Wisconsin.

Carl Hubbell

Carl Owen Hubbell (June 22, 1903 – November 21, 1988), nicknamed "The Meal Ticket" and "King Carl", was an American baseball player. He stood 6 feet 0 inches (1.83 m) tall and weighed 170 pounds (77 kg). He was a member of the New York Giants in the National League from 1928 to 1943. He remained on the team's payroll for the rest of his life, long after their move to San Francisco.

Twice voted the National League's Most Valuable Player, Hubbell was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1947. During 1936 and 1937, Hubbell set the major league record for consecutive wins by a pitcher with 24. He is perhaps best remembered for his performance in the 1934 All-Star Game, when he struck out five of the game's great hitters in succession. Hubbell's primary pitch was the screwball.

Dale Long

Richard Dale Long (February 6, 1926 – January 27, 1991) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball with the Pittsburgh Pirates, St. Louis Browns, Chicago Cubs, San Francisco Giants, New York Yankees and the Washington Senators between 1951 and 1963. He batted and threw left-handed.

A native of Springfield, Missouri, Long turned down an offer from the Green Bay Packers to play football, opting instead to play baseball.

Don Drysdale

Donald Scott Drysdale (July 23, 1936 – July 3, 1993) was an American professional baseball player and television sports commentator. A right-handed pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers for his entire career in Major League Baseball, Drysdale was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Drysdale won the 1962 Cy Young Award and in 1968 pitched a record six consecutive shutouts and ​58 2⁄3 consecutive scoreless innings.One of the most dominant pitchers of the late 1950s and early to mid 1960s, Drysdale stood 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m) tall and was not afraid to throw pitches near batters to keep them off balance. After his playing career, he became a radio and television broadcaster.

Ed Killian

Edwin Henry Killian (November 12, 1876 – July 18, 1928), nicknamed "Twilight Ed," was a Major League Baseball pitcher primarily of the Detroit Tigers. Twice a 20-game winner (including a 25–13 season in 1907), Killian's career ERA of 2.38 is tied for 24th best in Major League Baseball history, ahead of pitchers Cy Young and Grover Cleveland Alexander.

Ed Konetchy

Edward Joseph Konetchy (September 3, 1885 – May 27, 1947), nicknamed "Big Ed" and "The Candy Kid", was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball for a number of teams, primarily in the National League, from 1907 to 1921. He played for the St. Louis Cardinals (1907–1913), Pittsburgh Pirates (1914), Pittsburgh Rebels of the Federal League (1915), Boston Braves (1916–1918), Brooklyn Robins (1919–1921), and Philadelphia Phillies (1921). He batted and threw right-handed.

Jack Morris

John Scott Morris (born May 16, 1955) is an American former professional baseball starting pitcher. He is a color commentator for the Detroit Tigers on Fox Sports Detroit. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) between 1977 and 1994, mainly for the Detroit Tigers. Morris won 254 games throughout his career.

Armed with a fastball, a slider, and a forkball, Morris was a five-time All-Star (1981, 1984, 1985, 1987, and 1991), and played on four World Series Championship teams (1984 Tigers, 1991 Minnesota Twins, and 1992–1993 Toronto Blue Jays). He went 3–0 in the 1984 postseason with two complete game victories in the 1984 World Series, and 4–0 in the 1991 postseason with a ten-inning complete game victory in Game 7 of the 1991 World Series. Morris won the Babe Ruth Award in both 1984 and 1991, and was named World Series MVP in 1991. While he gave up the most hits, most earned runs, and most home runs of any pitcher in the 1980s, he also started the most games, pitched the most innings, and had the most wins of any pitcher in that decade. He is one of seven players in MLB history to have won back-to back World Series championships on different teams, the other six being Ben Zobrist, Jake Peavy, Bill Skowron, Clem Labine, Don Gullett, and Ryan Theriot.

Since retiring as a player, Morris has worked as a broadcast color analyst for the Blue Jays, Twins, and Tigers. He has also been an analyst for MLB broadcasts on Fox Sports 1. Morris was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2018.

Jack Taylor (1900s pitcher)

John W. Taylor (January 14, 1874 – March 4, 1938) was a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Chicago Cubs and St. Louis Cardinals.

Jim Barr

James Leland Barr (born February 10, 1948) is a former right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the San Francisco Giants (1971–1978, 1982–1983) and California Angels (1979–1980). He is perhaps best known for setting a record for consecutive batters retired (41, later tied by Bobby Jenks in 2007, and then broken by Mark Buehrle on July 28, 2009 and again by Yusmeiro Petit on August 28, 2014). Barr remains the only pitcher to retire as many as 41 consecutive batters in the course of only two games; his streak began in the third inning of a complete-game win and extended through the seventh inning of another complete-game win (Beurhle's streak included his perfect game and the starts before and after, while the streaks of Jenks and Petit included a number of relief appearances).

Barr attended the University of Southern California (USC), where his teammates included Dave Kingman, and helped lead their baseball team to a pair of NCAA championships in 1968 and 1970. He graduated from USC in 1970 with a Bachelor's degree in Business Administration. After previously being drafted five times (by the California Angels, Philadelphia Phillies, New York Yankees, Pittsburgh Pirates, and Minnesota Twins), he was selected by the San Francisco Giants in the third round of the 1970 amateur draft (Secondary Phase) and signed with the club that summer.

The Giants called Barr up from the minors midway through the 1971 season, and he posted a 1-1 record and a 3.57 ERA in 17 appearances out of the bullpen. He joined the team's rotation in the middle of 1972 and, despite never pitching a no-hitter or perfect game, that summer set the record for consecutive batters retired. Over the course of two starts, on August 23 and August 29, he retired 41 players in a row. On August 23 against the Pittsburgh Pirates, he walked opposing pitcher Bob Moose to lead off the third inning and then retired the final 21 batters to end the game with a 2-hitter. In his next start, he retired the first 20 St. Louis Cardinals in order before Bernie Carbo earned a seventh-inning double. He won that game too, with a complete game 3-hitter.

Barr went on to win at least ten games for the Giants in five straight seasons, from 1973 to 1977. During that time, he finished in the National League's top ten three times for earned run average and shutouts, twice for complete games and innings pitched, and led the league in 1974 with 1.76 BB/9IP. Following the 1978 campaign, he became a free agent and signed with the California Angels.

After winning 10 games in his first year with the Angels, Barr struggled with arm injuries in 1980 and was released prior to the 1981 season. He then signed with the Chicago White Sox and played part of the year for their Edmonton Trappers farm club before being let go again. He made a big league comeback with the Giants in 1982 and appeared in 53 games in both that season and the next.

Since ending his playing days, Barr was the pitching coach at Sacramento State University for 16 years. He currently lives with his wife, Susie, in Granite Bay, California.

Barr's athletic predisposition has been passed on to his daughters, Betsy and Emmy. Both have played soccer collegiately and professionally. Betsy played soccer at the University of Portland and was a member of the Women's United Soccer Association (WUSA) after being drafted by the San Jose CyberRays in 2003. Emmy went to Santa Clara University and played three seasons with the Washington Freedom of the WUSA. Additionally, his brother, Mark Barr, pitched in the Boston Red Sox farm system for several years in the 1970s.

Jimmie Foxx

James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967), nicknamed "Double X" and "The Beast", was an American professional baseball first baseman who played 20 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Athletics, Boston Red Sox, Chicago Cubs, and Philadelphia Phillies. His most productive years were with the Philadelphia Athletics and the Boston Red Sox, where he hit 30 or more home runs in 12 consecutive seasons and drove in more than 100 runs in 13 consecutive years.

Foxx became the second player in MLB history to hit 500 career home runs, after Babe Ruth. Attaining that plateau at age 32 years 336 days, he held the record for youngest to reach 500 for sixty-eight years, until superseded by Alex Rodriguez in 2007. His three career Most Valuable Player awards are tied for second all-time. Foxx was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1951.

Joe Sewell

Joseph Wheeler Sewell (October 9, 1898 – March 6, 1990) was a Major League Baseball infielder for the Cleveland Indians and New York Yankees. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1977.Sewell holds the record for the lowest strikeout rate in major league history, striking out on average only once every 62.5 at-bats, and the most consecutive games without a strikeout, at 115.

Major League Baseball titles streaks

At the end of each Major League Baseball season, the league leaders of various statistical categories are announced. Leading the league in a particular category is referred to as a title.

The following lists describe which players held, or at least shared, the title for a particular category three or more seasons in a row. Streaks of three years or more are shown for each league. Players listed under MLB led both the AL and NL in those years, or had a sufficient total in a given category to lead the major leagues without leading either league (for example, Mark McGwire's 58 homers in 1997 were the most in MLB, but he led neither league because he was traded from the Oakland Athletics to the St. Louis Cardinals in midseason). Active streaks are highlighted.

Mel Ott

Melvin Thomas Ott (March 2, 1909 – November 21, 1958), nicknamed "Master Melvin", was an American professional baseball right fielder, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Giants, from 1926 through 1947.

Ott was born in Gretna, the seat of government of Jefferson Parish in suburban New Orleans. He batted left-handed and threw right-handed. He was an All-Star for eleven consecutive seasons, and was the first National League player to surpass 500 career home runs. He was unusually slight in stature for a power hitter, at 5 feet 9 inches (1.75 m), 170 pounds (77 kg).He was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1951.

Mike Marshall (pitcher)

Michael Grant "Iron Mike" Marshall (born January 15, 1943) is an American former Major League Baseball pitcher. He played in 1967 and from 1969 through 1981 for nine different teams. Marshall won the National League Cy Young Award in 1974 and was a two time All-Star selection.

Ray Grimes

Oscar Ray Grimes Sr. (September 11, 1893 – May 25, 1953) was a first baseman in Major League Baseball who played for the Boston Red Sox (1920), Chicago Cubs (1922–1924) and Philadelphia Phillies (1926). Grimes batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Bergholz, Ohio.

Rube Marquard

Richard William "Rube" Marquard (October 9, 1886 – June 1, 1980) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball in the 1910s and early 1920s. He achieved his greatest success with the New York Giants. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1971.

Stuffy McInnis

John Phalen "Stuffy" McInnis (September 19, 1890 – February 16, 1960) was a first baseman and manager in Major League Baseball.

McInnis gained his nickname as a youngster in the Boston suburban leagues, where his spectacular playing brought shouts of "that's the stuff, kid".

From 1909-27, McInnis played for the Philadelphia Athletics (1909–17), Boston Red Sox (1918–21), Cleveland Indians (1922), Boston Braves (1923–24), Pittsburgh Pirates (1925–26) and Philadelphia Phillies (1927). He batted and threw right-handed.

Vince Coleman

Vincent Maurice Coleman (born September 22, 1961) is an American former Major League Baseball (MLB) player, best known for his years with the St. Louis Cardinals. Primarily a left fielder, Coleman played from 1985 to 1997 and set a number of stolen base records. He was a switch hitter and threw right-handed. He was a baserunning consultant

for the Chicago White Sox during the 2015 season. He was hired by the San Francisco Giants in 2017 as a minor-league baserunning and outfield coach.

Walt Dropo

Walter Dropo (Serbian: Валтер Дропо, Valter Dropo; January 30, 1923 – December 17, 2010), nicknamed "Moose", was an American college basketball standout and a professional baseball first baseman. During a 13-year career in Major League Baseball, he played for the Boston Red Sox (1949–1952), Detroit Tigers (1952–1954), Chicago White Sox (1955–1958), Cincinnati Redlegs (1958–1959) and Baltimore Orioles (1959–1961).

General
Batting
leaders
Baserunning
leaders
Pitching
leaders
Fielding
leaders
Managing
records
Multiple stat
records
Other

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.