List of Major League Baseball career wins leaders

This is a list of Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers with 200 or more career wins. In the sport of baseball, a win is a statistic credited to the pitcher for the winning team who was in the game when his team last took the lead. A starting pitcher must complete five innings to earn a win; if this does not happen, the official scorer awards the win based on guidelines set forth in the official rules.

Cy Young holds the MLB win record with 511; Walter Johnson is second with 417. Young and Johnson are the only players to earn 400 or more wins. Among pitchers whose entire careers were in the post-1920 live-ball era, Warren Spahn has the most wins with 363. Only 24 pitchers have accumulated 300 or more wins in their careers. Roger Clemens is the only pitcher with 300 wins or more not elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

MLB officially only keeps statistics from the National League and the American League. This table includes statistics from other major leagues as well which are defunct now, including the American Association (AA), the National Association of Base Ball Players and the National Association of Professional Baseball Players.

Cy Young 1 MLB HOF
Cy Young, the all-time leader in career wins

Key

Rank Rank amongst leaders in career wins. A blank field indicates a tie.
Player (2019 Ws) Number of wins accumulated during the 2019 Major League Baseball season.
W Total career wins.
* Denotes elected to National Baseball Hall of Fame.
Bold Denotes active player.[note 1]

List

  • Stats updated as of August 4, 2019.
Rank Player (2019 Ws) W
1 Cy Young * 511
2 Walter Johnson * 417
3 Grover Cleveland Alexander * 373
Christy Mathewson * 373
5 Pud Galvin * 365
6 Warren Spahn * 363
7 Kid Nichols * 361
8 Greg Maddux * 355
9 Roger Clemens 354
10 Tim Keefe * 342
11 Steve Carlton * 329
12 John Clarkson * 328
13 Eddie Plank * 326
14 Nolan Ryan * 324
Don Sutton * 324
16 Phil Niekro * 318
17 Gaylord Perry * 314
18 Tom Seaver * 311
19 Charles Radbourn * 309
20 Mickey Welch * 307
21 Tom Glavine * 305
22 Randy Johnson * 303
23 Lefty Grove * 300
Early Wynn * 300
25 Bobby Mathews 297
26 Tommy John 288
27 Bert Blyleven * 287
28 Robin Roberts * 286
29 Ferguson Jenkins * 284
Tony Mullane 284
31 Jim Kaat 283
32 Red Ruffing * 273
33 Burleigh Grimes * 270
Mike Mussina * 270
35 Jamie Moyer 269
36 Jim Palmer * 268
37 Bob Feller * 266
Eppa Rixey * 266
39 Jim McCormick 265
Rank Player (2019 Ws) W
40 Gus Weyhing 264
41 Ted Lyons * 260
42 Andy Pettitte 256
43 Red Faber * 254
Jack Morris * 254
45 Carl Hubbell * 253
46 Albert Spalding * 252
47 Bob Gibson * 251
CC Sabathia (5) 251
49 Vic Willis * 249
50 Bartolo Colón (0) 247
Jack Quinn 247
52 Joe McGinnity * 246
Amos Rusie * 246
54 Dennis Martínez 245
Jack Powell 245
56 Juan Marichal * 243
57 Herb Pennock * 241
58 Frank Tanana 240
59 Mordecai Brown * 239
David Wells 239
61 Clark Griffith * 237
Waite Hoyt * 237
63 Whitey Ford * 236
64 Tommy Bond 234
65 Charlie Buffinton 233
66 Sad Sam Jones 229
Luis Tiant 229
Will White 229
69 George Mullin 228
70 Jim Bunning * 224
Catfish Hunter * 224
72 Hooks Dauss 223
Paul Derringer 223
Mel Harder 223
75 Tim Hudson 222
Jerry Koosman 222
77 Joe Niekro 221
78 Jerry Reuss 220
Rank Player (2019 Ws) W
79 Pedro Martínez * 219
Kenny Rogers 219
Justin Verlander (15) 219
82 Bob Caruthers 218
Earl Whitehill 218
84 Freddie Fitzsimmons 217
Mickey Lolich 217
86 Wilbur Cooper 216
Charlie Hough 216
Curt Schilling 216
89 Stan Coveleski * 215
Jim Perry 215
91 Mark Buehrle 214
Rick Reuschel 214
93 John Smoltz * 213
94 Chief Bender * 212
95 Kevin Brown 211
Bobo Newsom 211
Billy Pierce 211
Bob Welch 211
99 Jesse Haines * 210
100 Vida Blue 209
Eddie Cicotte 209
Don Drysdale * 209
Milt Pappas 209
104 Bob Lemon * 207
Carl Mays 207
Hal Newhouser * 207
107 Orel Hershiser 204
Al Orth 204
109 Lew Burdette 203
Roy Halladay * 203
Silver King 203
Jack Stivetts 203
113 Rube Marquard * 201
Charlie Root 201
115 Chuck Finley 200
George Uhle 200
Tim Wakefield 200

See also

Notes

  1. ^ A player is considered inactive if he has announced his retirement or not played for a full season.

External links

Al Orth

Albert Lewis Orth (September 5, 1872 – October 8, 1948) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. He later served as a major league umpire and college baseball coach.

Bill Dietrich

William John "Bullfrog" Dietrich (March 29, 1910 – June 20, 1978) was an American professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1933 to 1948 for the Philadelphia Athletics, Washington Senators, and Chicago White Sox.

In 16 seasons, Dietrich posted a 108–128 career record. He recorded a winning mark in just three seasons, yet was usually close to .500 every year. His best year in terms of wins was 1944 when he went 16–17 for the White Sox.On June 1, 1937, while with the White Sox, Dietrich no-hit the St. Louis Browns 8–0 at Comiskey Park.

Billy Rhines

William Pearl Rhines (March 14, 1869 – January 30, 1922) was a professional baseball player. He was a pitcher over parts of 9 seasons (1890–1899) with the Cincinnati Reds, Louisville Colonels and Pittsburgh Pirates. He led the National League in ERA twice (1890 and 1896) while playing for Cincinnati. For his career, he compiled a 114–103 record in 249 appearances, with a 3.47 ERA and 743 strikeouts.

He was born and later died in Ridgway, Pennsylvania, at the age of 52. He was an alumnus of Bucknell University.

Charlie Hough

Charles Oliver Hough (; born January 5, 1948) is a former Major League Baseball knuckleball pitcher.

Dave Goltz

David Allan "Dave" Goltz (born June 23, 1949), is a former professional baseball player who pitched in the Major Leagues from 1972 to 1983.

Goltz served in the United States Army during the Vietnam War as a helicopter mechanic.In 1977, Goltz won a career-high 20 games for the Twins and tied with Dennis Leonard and Jim Palmer for most wins in the American League.

Goltz appeared in the 1981 World Series as a member of the Dodgers.

Don Gullett

Donald Edward Gullett (born January 6, 1951) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who played for the Cincinnati Reds and New York Yankees from 1970 to 1978. He also served as pitching coach for the Cincinnati Reds from 1993 to 2005.

Ed Stein (baseball)

Edward F. Stein (September 5, 1869 – May 12, 1928) was a Major League Baseball player who pitched for the Chicago Colts and Brooklyn Grooms/Bridegrooms of the National League from 1890 to 1898.

Gary Nolan (baseball)

Gary Lynn Nolan (born May 27, 1948 in Herlong, California) is a former Major League Baseball right-handed starting pitcher who played with the Cincinnati Reds (1967–73, 1975–77) and California Angels (1977). He was inducted into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame in 1983.

Geoff Zahn

Geoffery Clayton Zahn (born December 19, 1945) is a former professional baseball pitcher. He pitched thirteen seasons in Major League Baseball from 1973 to 1985. In his career, he had a Win–loss record of 111–109, an earned run average of 3.74, and 705 strikeouts.

George Uhle

George Ernest Uhle (September 18, 1898 – February 26, 1985) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. Born in Cleveland, Ohio, he began his playing career with his hometown Cleveland Indians. After ten seasons, during which time he led the American League in wins, innings pitched, complete games, shutouts, and games started, he was traded in 1928 to the Detroit Tigers for Jackie Tavener and Ken Holloway. He went on to play with the New York Giants, New York Yankees, and again with the Indians. When his career ended in 1936, he had won 200 games. His lifetime batting average of .289 (393-for-1360) is still a record for a pitcher (not playing at any other position)

On May 25, 1929, the Detroit Tigers defeated the Chicago White Sox 6-5 in 21 innings. Uhle, who was the winning pitcher, pitched twenty innings to earn his eighth win of the season with no losses. The losing pitcher, Ted Lyons, pitched all 21 innings for Chicago.

Babe Ruth himself credited George with being the toughest pitcher he ever faced, although Ruth batted .336 against Uhle. Out of 714 career home runs, he got only four off Uhle. Uhle had the second most strikeouts of Ruth by a pitcher, with 25. Only Lefty Grove had more, with 27.

He was buried at Lakewood Park Cemetery in Rocky River, Ohio.

Jeff Tesreau

Charles Monroe "Jeff" Tesreau (March 5, 1888 – October 24, 1946) was an American Major League Baseball player.

Jim Hearn

James Tolbert Hearn (April 11, 1921 – June 10, 1998) was an American professional baseball player, a pitcher in Major League Baseball for 13 seasons (1947–59). The right-hander was listed as 6 feet 3 inches (1.91 m) tall and 205 pounds (93 kg).

Jim Perry (baseball)

James Evan Perry, Jr. (born October 30, 1935) is an American former Major League Baseball pitcher. He pitched from 1959–1975 for four teams. During a 17-year baseball career, Perry compiled 215 wins, 1,576 strikeouts, and a 3.45 earned run average.

List of Major League Baseball career shutout leaders

In Major League Baseball, a shutout (denoted statistically as ShO or SHO) refers to the act by which a single pitcher pitches a complete game and does not allow the opposing team to score a run. If two or more pitchers combine to complete this act, no pitcher is awarded a shutout, although the team itself can be said to have "shutout" the opposing team.

Walter Johnson is the all-time leader in shutouts with 110. Johnson also holds the record for being the only pitcher to throw more than 100 shutouts.

Mark Portugal

Mark Steven Portugal (born October 30, 1962) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who played in the major leagues from 1985 to 1999.

Orval Overall

Orval Overall (February 2, 1881 – July 14, 1947) was an American pitcher in Major League Baseball. He was a member of the Chicago Cubs dynasty of the early 1900s.

Sad Sam Jones

Samuel Pond "Sad Sam" Jones (July 26, 1892 – July 6, 1966) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher with the Cleveland Indians, Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees, St. Louis Browns, Washington Senators and the Chicago White Sox between 1914 and 1935. Jones batted and threw right-handed. His sharp breaking curveball also earned him the nickname "Horsewhips Sam".

Shane Rawley

Shane William Rawley (born July 27, 1955) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. He played all or part of twelve seasons in the majors, from 1978 through 1989, for the Seattle Mariners, New York Yankees, Philadelphia Phillies, and Minnesota Twins.

Rawley was selected to the National League All-Star team in 1986 as a member of the Phillies. The next year, he won a career high 17 games, leading the NL in games started with 36. In his major league career, Rawley's record was 111-118, with 991 strikeouts and a 4.02 earned run average (ERA).

Walt Terrell

Charles Walter Terrell (born May 11, 1958) is a retired Major League Baseball player. A starting pitcher, Terrell pitched from 1982 to 1992 for the New York Mets (1982–1984), Detroit Tigers (1985–1988), San Diego Padres (1989), New York Yankees (1989), Pittsburgh Pirates (1990), and the Tigers (1990–1992).

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