List of Major League Baseball career strikeouts by batters leaders

In baseball, a strikeout (or strike-out) occurs when a batter accumulates three strikes during a time at bat (i.e. the batter fails to hit the ball in three successive pitches). It usually means the batter is out. A strikeout is a statistic recorded for both pitchers and batters, and is denoted by K.[1]

Reggie Jackson holds the record for the most career strikeouts by a batter with 2,597. Jim Thome (2,548), Adam Dunn (2,379), Sammy Sosa (2,306), Alex Rodriguez (2,287) and Andres Galarraga (2,003) are the only other hitters to strikeout over 2,000 times.

Reggie Jackson bats at Yankee Stadium
Reggie Jackson, the all-time leader in strikeouts by a batter

Key

Rank Rank amongst leaders in career strikeouts. A blank field indicates a tie.
Player (2019 Ks) Number of strikeouts during the 2019 Major League Baseball season.
K Total career strikeouts.
* Denotes elected to National Baseball Hall of Fame.
Bold Denotes active player.[note 1]

List

Mark Reynolds 2011
Mark Reynolds, the active leader in career strikeouts and 9th all-time.
  • Stats updated as of July 18, 2019.
Rank Player (2019 Ks) K
1 Reggie Jackson * 2,597
2 Jim Thome * 2,548
3 Adam Dunn 2,379
4 Sammy Sosa 2,306
5 Alex Rodriguez 2,287
6 Andrés Galarraga 2,003
7 Jose Canseco 1,942
8 Willie Stargell * 1,936
9 Mark Reynolds (54) 1,924
10 Mike Cameron 1,901
11 Curtis Granderson (68) 1,886
12 Mike Schmidt * 1,883
13 Fred McGriff 1,882
14 Tony Pérez * 1,867
15 Ryan Howard 1,843
16 Bobby Abreu 1,840
Derek Jeter 1,840
18 Dave Kingman 1,816
19 Manny Ramírez 1,813
20 Alfonso Soriano 1,803
21 Carlos Beltrán 1,795
22 Chris Davis (88) 1,785
23 Ken Griffey Jr. * 1,779
24 Bobby Bonds 1,757
25 Craig Biggio * 1,753
26 David Ortiz 1,750
27 Andruw Jones 1,748
Dale Murphy 1,748
29 Justin Upton (25) 1,746
30 Carlos Delgado 1,745
31 Torii Hunter 1,741
32 Adrián Beltré 1,732
33 Lou Brock * 1,730
34 Jim Edmonds 1,729
35 Miguel Cabrera (70) 1,723
36 Mickey Mantle * 1,710
37 Harmon Killebrew * 1,699
38 Chili Davis 1,698
39 Dwight Evans 1,697
40 Rickey Henderson * 1,694
41 Dave Winfield * 1,686
42 Derrek Lee 1,622
43 Reggie Sanders 1,614
44 Gary Gaetti 1,602
45 Matt Kemp (19) 1,600
46 Mark McGwire 1,596
47 Carlos Peña 1,577
48 Jason Giambi 1,572
49 Lee May 1,570
50 Pat Burrell 1,564
Rank Player (2019 Ks) K
51 Melvin Upton Jr. 1,561
52 Jeff Bagwell * 1,558
53 Dick Allen 1,556
54 Ray Lankford 1,550
Willie McCovey * 1,550
56 Barry Bonds 1,539
57 Dave Parker 1,537
58 Frank Robinson * 1,532
59 Jay Bruce (74) 1,527
Lance Parrish 1,527
61 Willie Mays * 1,526
Devon White 1,526
63 Jeff Kent 1,522
64 Nelson Cruz (82) 1,518
65 Eddie Murray * 1,516
66 Rick Monday 1,513
Greg Vaughn 1,513
68 Andre Dawson * 1,509
69 Tony Phillips 1,499
70 Greg Luzinski 1,495
71 Eddie Mathews * 1,487
72 Shin-Soo Choo (95) 1,476
73 Iván Rodríguez * 1,474
74 Mike Napoli 1,468
75 Alex Gordon (67) 1,465
76 Frank Howard 1,460
77 Jorge Posada 1,453
78 Jhonny Peralta 1,450
Jayson Werth 1,450
80 Jay Bell 1,443
81 Juan Samuel 1,442
82 Harold Baines * 1,441
Jack Clark 1,441
Mark Teixeira 1,441
85 Mo Vaughn 1,429
86 Jimmy Wynn 1,427
87 Jim Rice * 1,423
88 George Foster 1,419
89 George Scott 1,418
90 Royce Clayton 1,415
91 Ron Gant 1,411
92 Darrell Evans 1,410
Scott Rolen 1,410
94 Rob Deer 1,409
Chipper Jones * 1,409
96 Adam LaRoche 1,407
97 Jay Buhner 1,406
98 Adrián González 1,401
99 Eric Davis 1,398
100 Frank Thomas * 1,397

Notes

  1. ^ A player is considered inactive if he has announced his retirement or not played for a full season.

External links

  1. ^ Major League Baseball (2001–2009). "Baseball Basics: Abbreviations". Retrieved September 2, 2009.
Alex Rodriguez

Alexander Emmanuel Rodriguez (born July 27, 1975), nicknamed "A-Rod", is an American former professional baseball shortstop and third baseman who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB), primarily with the New York Yankees. He also played for the Seattle Mariners and Texas Rangers. Rodriguez began his professional career as one of the sport's most highly touted prospects, and is considered to be one of the greatest baseball players of all time. Rodriguez amassed a .295 batting average, over 600 home runs (696), over 2,000 runs batted in (RBI), over 2,000 runs scored, over 3,000 hits, and over 300 stolen bases, the only player in MLB history to achieve all of those feats. He was also a 14-time All-Star, winning three American League (AL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) Awards, ten Silver Slugger Awards, and two Gold Glove Awards. Rodríguez is also the career record holder for grand slams with 25. He signed two of the most lucrative sports contracts in baseball. In addition to his accomplishments, he also led a controversial career due to some of his behaviors, including the use of performance-enhancing drugs.The Mariners selected Rodriguez first overall in the 1993 MLB draft, and he debuted in the major leagues the following year at the age of 18. In 1996, he became the Mariners' starting shortstop, won the major league batting championship, and finished second in voting for the AL MVP Award. His combination of power, speed, and defense made him a cornerstone of the franchise, but he left the team via free agency after the 2000 season to join the Rangers. The 10-year, $252 million contract he signed was the richest in baseball history at the time. He played at a high level in his three years with Texas, highlighted by his first AL MVP Award win in 2003, but the team failed to make the playoffs during his tenure. Prior to the 2004 season, Rodriguez was traded to the Yankees, for whom he converted to a third baseman, because Derek Jeter was already the Yankees' full-time shortstop. During Rodriguez's career with the Yankees, he was named AL MVP in 2005 and 2007. After opting out of his contract following the 2007 season, Rodriguez signed a new 10-year, $275 million deal with the Yankees, extending his record for the sport's most lucrative contract. He became the youngest player ever to hit 500 home runs, reaching the milestone in 2007. He was part of the Yankees' 2009 World Series championship over the Philadelphia Phillies, which was the first year of the new Yankee Stadium and Rodriguez's only world title. Toward the end of his career, Rodriguez was hampered by hip and knee injuries, which caused him to become exclusively a designated hitter. He played his final game in professional baseball on August 12, 2016.

During a 2007 interview with Katie Couric on 60 Minutes, Rodriguez denied using performance-enhancing drugs. In February 2009, Rodriguez admitted to using steroids, saying he used them from 2001 to 2003 when playing for Rangers due to "an enormous amount of pressure" to perform. While recovering from a hip injury in 2013, Rodriguez made headlines by feuding with team management over his rehabilitation and for having allegedly obtained performance-enhancing drugs as part of the Biogenesis baseball scandal. In August 2013, MLB suspended him for 211 games for his involvement in the scandal, but he was allowed to play while appealing the punishment. Had the original suspension been upheld, it would have been the longest non-lifetime suspension in Major League Baseball history. After an arbitration hearing, the suspension was reduced to 162 games, which kept him off the field for the entire 2014 season.After retiring as a player, Rodriguez became a media personality, serving as a broadcaster for Fox Sports 1, a cast member of Shark Tank and a member of the ABC News network. In January 2018, ESPN announced that Rodriguez would be joining the broadcast team of Sunday Night Baseball In January 2017, CNBC announced Rodriguez would be the host of the show Back In The Game, where he would help former athletes make a comeback in their personal lives; the first episode debuted on the network in March 2018.

Barry Bonds

Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964) is an American former professional baseball left fielder who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) with the Pittsburgh Pirates and San Francisco Giants. He received a record seven NL MVP awards, eight Gold Glove awards, a record 12 Silver Slugger awards, and 14 All-Star selections. He is considered to be one of the greatest baseball players of all time.Bonds was regarded as an exceptional hitter: he led MLB in on-base plus slugging six times, and placed within the top five hitters in 12 of his 17 qualifying seasons. He holds many MLB hitting records, including most career home runs (762), most home runs in a single season (73, set in 2001) and most career walks.Bonds was also known as a talented all-around baseball player. He won eight Gold Glove awards for his defensive play in the outfield. He stole 514 bases with his baserunning speed, becoming the first and only MLB player to date with at least 500 home runs and 500 stolen bases (no other player has even 400 of each). He is ranked second in career Wins Above Replacement among all major league position players by both Fangraphs and Baseball-Reference.com, behind only Babe Ruth.However, Bonds led a controversial career, notably as a central figure in baseball's steroids scandal. In 2007, he was indicted on charges of perjury and obstruction of justice for allegedly lying to the grand jury during the federal government's investigation of BALCO. The perjury charges against Bonds were dropped and an initial obstruction of justice conviction was overturned in 2015.Bonds became eligible for the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2013; he has not been elected, with his highest share of the vote coming in 2019, his seventh of ten years of eligibility, when he received 59.1%.

Carlos Beltrán

Carlos Chester "Chet" Beltrán (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈkaɾloz βelˈtɾan]; born April 24, 1977) is a Puerto Rican former professional baseball outfielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1998 to 2017 for the Kansas City Royals, Houston Astros, New York Mets, San Francisco Giants, St. Louis Cardinals, New York Yankees, and Texas Rangers. A right-handed thrower and switch hitter, Beltrán stands 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 m) tall and weighs 215 pounds (98 kg).

Beltrán was the American League (AL) Rookie of the Year in 1999 while with the Royals. He was named to nine MLB All-Star Games, and won three Gold Glove Awards and two Silver Slugger Awards. Beltrán was the fifth player to reach both 400 home runs and 300 stolen bases and just the fourth switch hitter with 400 home runs. He is also a member of the 30–30 club, as he has hit 30 home runs and stolen 30 bases in the same season. Beltrán retired after the 2017 season, winning a World Series title with the Houston Astros.

Beltrán is among the best all-time statistical hitters in postseason games, which has earned him nicknames such as "the new Mr. October", "Mr. October, Jr.", "Señor Octubre", and "the real Mr. October" from the media. He broke the 1.000 OPS mark in four different playoff series. Beltrán also had a 100% stolen base percentage (11-for-11) during the playoffs, which are the most stolen bases without being caught.

Chris Davis (baseball)

Christopher Lyn Davis (born March 17, 1986), nicknamed "Crush Davis", is an American professional baseball first baseman for the Baltimore Orioles of Major League Baseball (MLB). Davis played in MLB for the Texas Rangers from 2008 until being traded to the Baltimore Orioles in 2011. He bats left-handed and throws right-handed. While primarily a first baseman throughout his career, Davis has also been a designated hitter, third baseman, and outfielder.

Davis attended Navarro Junior College and was selected by the Rangers in the fifth round of the 2006 MLB draft. He ascended quickly through the Rangers' minor league system, getting named their Minor League Player of the Year in 2007. He was called up in the middle of 2008 and had a strong start to his major league career. He was the Rangers' starting first baseman for 92 games in 2009 and hit 21 home runs, but a low batting average and his tendency to strike out left the Rangers dissatisfied with him. Because of this, the Rangers sent Davis back and forth between the minors and the majors over the next two years and left him off their playoff roster in 2010. On July 30, 2011, they traded him to the Orioles.

Davis appeared in 31 games for the Orioles in 2011. In the lineup full-time in 2012, he hit 33 home runs while batting .270 and helping the Orioles reach the playoffs for the first time since 1997. In 2013, his 53 home runs led all MLB players and set a new Orioles single-season franchise record. Davis also had 138 runs batted in (RBIs), was selected to the All-Star Game, and finished third in American League Most Valuable Player Award (MVP) voting.

From 2015 through 2018, Davis led all major league players in strikeouts-per-at-bat. In 2018, he set the MLB record for the lowest batting average ever for a qualified player when he batted .168. In 2019, he set the MLB record for the most consecutive at bats by a position player without a hit, going 0-for-54 before breaking his hitless streak on April 13, 2019 against the Boston Red Sox.

David Ortiz

David Américo Ortiz Arias (born November 18, 1975), nicknamed "Big Papi", is a Dominican-American former Major League Baseball (MLB) designated hitter (DH) and first baseman who played 20 seasons, primarily with the Boston Red Sox. He also played for the Minnesota Twins. During his 14 seasons with the Red Sox, he was a ten-time All-Star, a three-time World Series champion, and a seven-time Silver Slugger winner. Ortiz also holds the Red Sox single-season record for home runs with 54, which he set during the 2006 season.

Originally signed by the Seattle Mariners in 1992, Ortiz was traded to the Twins in 1996 and played parts of six seasons with the team. Ortiz was released by the Twins and signed with the Boston Red Sox in 2003, where he spent the remainder of his career. In Boston, Ortiz established himself as "one of the greatest designated hitters the game has ever seen." He was instrumental in the team ending its 86-year World Series championship drought in 2004, as well as during successful championship runs in 2007 and 2013, and was named MVP of the latter.

Ortiz finished his career with 541 home runs (which ranks 17th on the MLB all-time home run list), 1,768 RBIs (22nd all-time), and a .286 batting average. Among designated hitters, he is the all-time leader in MLB history for home runs (485), runs batted in (RBIs) (1,569), and hits (2,192). Regarded as one of the best clutch hitters of all time, Ortiz had 11 career walk-off home runs during the regular season and two during the postseason.

Jeff Bagwell

Jeffrey Robert Bagwell (born May 27, 1968) is an American former professional first baseman and coach who spent his entire 15-year Major League Baseball (MLB) playing career with the Houston Astros. Originally a Boston Red Sox fourth-round selection from the University of Hartford as a third baseman in the 1989 amateur draft, he was then traded to the Astros in 1990. The National League (NL) Rookie of the Year in 1991, Bagwell then won the NL Most Valuable Player (MVP) in 1994, was a four-time MLB All-Star, three-time Silver Slugger winner and a Gold Glove recipient. Forming a core part of Astros lineups with Craig Biggio and Lance Berkman given the epithet "Killer B's", Houston finished in first or second place in the National League Central division in 11 of 12 seasons from 1994 to 2005. They qualified for the playoffs six times, culminating in Bagwell's lone World Series appearance in 2005. He was elected to the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2005, and to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2017.

Bagwell was part of the trade that sent relief pitcher Larry Andersen to the Red Sox, now regarded as one of the most lopsided trades in sports history. Andersen pitched just 22 innings for Boston while Bagwell hit 449 home runs for the Astros, the most in club history, among setting numerous other franchise career and single-season records. He excelled at every major aspect of the game, including hitting, on-base ability, running, defense, and throwing. One of the most consistent players of his generation, in each of his first 11 seasons, he produced no fewer than 4.7 wins above replacement (WAR) per Baseball-Reference.com. His 1994 season was perhaps his finest. As the fourth unanimous NL MVP in history, he set the record for fewest plate appearances to reach both 100 runs scored and 100 runs batted in, produced a .750 slugging percentage − the highest in the NL since 1925 − while batting a career-high .368. In 1999, he finished second in the MVP voting, producing his second career 30–30 season.

The only player in MLB history to have six consecutive seasons (1996–2001) with 30 home runs, 100 RBI, 100 runs scored, and 100 walks. Bagwell is just the fifth to achieve 300 home runs, 1,000 RBI, and 1,000 runs scored in his first 10 seasons. He is one of 12 players in history to hit 400 home runs and record an on-base percentage (OBP) of .400, and the only first baseman with at least 400 home runs and 200 stolen bases. Overall, Bagwell batted over .300 six times, had a career OBP of .408 (39th all-time) and a slugging percentage of .540 (32nd all-time). He is the only first baseman to achieve the 30–30 club more than once. His 79.6 career WAR per Baseball-Reference.com ranks sixth all-time among first basemen.

Since his playing career ended, Bagwell has served in sporadic instructor assignments with the Astros, including as hitting coach in 2010.

Mark McGwire

Mark David McGwire (born October 1, 1963), nicknamed Big Mac, is an American former professional baseball first baseman. His Major League Baseball (MLB) playing career spanned from 1986 to 2001 while playing for the Oakland Athletics and the St. Louis Cardinals, winning one World Series championship each with Oakland as a player in 1989 and with St. Louis as a coach in 2011. One of the most prolific home run hitters in baseball history, McGwire holds the major league career record for at bats per home run ratio (10.6), and is the former record holder for both home runs in a single season (70 in 1998) and home runs hit by rookie (49 in 1987).

He ranks 11th all time in home runs with 583, and led the major leagues in home runs in five different seasons, while establishing the major league record for home runs hit in a four-season period from 1996−1999 with 245. Further, he demonstrated exemplary patience as a batter, producing a career .394 on-base percentage (OBP) and twice leading the major leagues in bases on balls. Injuries cut short the manifestation of even greater potential as he reached 140 games played in just eight of 16 total seasons. A right-handed batter and thrower, McGwire stood 6 feet 5 inches (1.96 m) tall and weighed 245 pounds (111 kg) during his playing career.

From Pomona, California, the Athletics chose McGwire with the 10th overall selection in the 1984 MLB draft, and he was a member of the silver medal-winning entry of the United States national team that same year at the Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. As a rookie in 1987, he quickly grabbed media attention with 33 home runs before the All-Star break, and would lead the major leagues in home runs that year with 49, while setting the single-season rookie record. He appeared in six straight All-Star Games from 1987 to 1992 despite a brief career decline related to injuries. Another string of six consecutive All-Star appearances followed from 1995 to 2001. Each season from 1996 to 1999, he again led the major leagues in home runs.

A part of the 1998 Major League Baseball home run record chase of Roger Maris' 61 with the Cardinals, McGwire set the major league single-season home run record with 70, which Barry Bonds broke three years later with 73. McGwire also led the league in runs batted in, twice in bases on balls and on-base percentage, and four times in slugging percentage. Injuries significantly cut into his playing time in 2000 and 2001 before factoring into his retirement. He finished with 583 home runs, which was fifth all-time when he retired.For his career, McGwire averaged a home run once every 10.61 at bats, the best at bats per home run ratio in baseball history (Babe Ruth is second at 11.76). He was the fastest player to hit 500 home runs, in 5,487 at-bats.McGwire was a central figure in baseball's steroids scandal. In 2010, McGwire publicly admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs during a large portion of his career. In his first ten years of eligibility, McGwire has not been elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Mark Reynolds (baseball)

Mark Andrew Reynolds (born August 3, 1983) is an American professional baseball infielder for the Colorado Rockies of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played for the Arizona Diamondbacks, Baltimore Orioles, Cleveland Indians, New York Yankees, Milwaukee Brewers, St. Louis Cardinals, Washington Nationals, and two stints with the Rockies. A right-hander both when batting and throwing, Reynolds has gained attention for his frequent and long home runs, high strikeout totals, and defensive versatility, having been primarily a third baseman before transitioning to first base while playing for the Orioles.

The Diamondbacks drafted Reynolds in the 16th round of the 2004 MLB draft from the Cavaliers of the University of Virginia, with whom he played mainly shortstop. In the minor leagues, he played second base, third base, shortstop, and left field. He broke out in 2006 with Lancaster and Tennessee, batting .318 with 31 home runs (HR) and 98 runs batted in (RBIs) in 106 games. With the Diamondbacks in 2009, he established career highs in HRs (44), RBIs (102), stolen bases (24), and runs scored (98).

Known for his extreme statistical output, Reynolds displays prodigious power-hitting, record-breaking strikeout totals, and high error totals. Between 2009 and 2011, he finished with top ten home run totals and at bats per home run rates. In 2009, he set the all-time record for most strikeouts among batters in a season. He also holds two other of the ten-highest single-season strikeout totals (211 and 204), and led the league in strikeouts in four consecutive seasons. As of 2018, he led all active major league ballplayers in career strikeouts, with 1,870.

Mark Teixeira

Mark Charles Teixeira ( tay-SHAIR-ə; born April 11, 1980) is an American former professional baseball first baseman who played 14 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB), primarily with the New York Yankees. He also played for the Texas Rangers, Atlanta Braves and Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. Before his professional career, he played college baseball at Georgia Tech, where in 2001 he won the Dick Howser Trophy as the national collegiate baseball player of the year. One of the most prolific switch hitters in MLB history, Teixeira was an integral part of the Yankees' 27th World Series championship in 2009, leading the American League (AL) in home runs and runs batted in (RBI) while finishing second in the Most Valuable Player Award (MVP) balloting. Teixeira was a three-time All-Star, won five Gold Glove Awards and three Silver Slugger Awards, and also holds the all-time major league record for most games with a home run from both sides of the plate, with 14. He was the fifth switch hitter in MLB history to reach 400 home runs.

Drafted fifth overall by the Texas Rangers in 2001, Teixeira made his MLB debut on Opening Day in 2003, and hit 26 home runs as a rookie. He hit career-highs of 43 home runs and 144 RBI in 2005. The centerpiece of consecutive mid-season trades in 2007 and 2008, the Rangers first sent him to the Braves for a prospect package centered around Elvis Andrus and Matt Harrison. He was later traded in July 2008 to the Los Angeles Angels, where he played for half a season and lost in the first round of the playoffs. In December 2008, he agreed to a lucrative eight-year contract with the Yankees, contributing his most productive season in pinstripes the following year. Injuries limited his effectiveness afterward, including a calf strain in 2012, early season-ending wrist surgery in 2013, various ailments in 2014, a shin fracture in 2015, and neck spasms and torn cartilage in 2016. Teixeira retired at the conclusion of the 2016 season and contract with the Yankees. In each season from 2004 to 2011, Teixeira hit at least 30 home runs with 100 RBI.

Paul Konerko

Paul Henry Konerko (; born March 5, 1976) is an American former professional baseball first baseman who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Cincinnati Reds and, for most of his career, the Chicago White Sox. Konerko helped the White Sox win the 2005 World Series over the Houston Astros, the franchise's first since 1917. From 2006 to 2014 he served as the White Sox captain.

Reggie Jackson

Reginald Martinez Jackson (born May 18, 1946) is an American former professional baseball right fielder who played 21 seasons for the Kansas City / Oakland Athletics, Baltimore Orioles, New York Yankees, and California Angels of Major League Baseball (MLB). Jackson was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1993.

Jackson was nicknamed "Mr. October" for his clutch hitting in the postseason with the Athletics and the Yankees. He helped Oakland win five consecutive American League West divisional pennants, three consecutive American League pennants and three consecutive World Series titles, from 1972 to 1974. Jackson helped New York win four American League East divisional pennants, three American League pennants and two consecutive World Series titles, from 1977 to 1981. He also helped the California Angels win two AL West divisional pennants in 1982 and 1986. Jackson hit three consecutive home runs at Yankee Stadium in the clinching game six of the 1977 World Series.Jackson hit 563 career home runs and was an American League (AL) All-Star for 14 seasons. He won two Silver Slugger Awards, the AL Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in 1973, two World Series MVP Awards, and the Babe Ruth Award in 1977. The Yankees and Athletics retired his team uniform number in 1993 and 2004. Jackson currently serves as a special advisor to the Yankees.Jackson led his teams to first place ten times over his 21 year career.

Scott Rolen

Scott Bruce Rolen (born April 4, 1975) is an American former professional baseball third baseman. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Phillies, St. Louis Cardinals, Toronto Blue Jays and Cincinnati Reds. He was an eight-time Gold Glove winner, seven-time All-Star and the 1997 National League Rookie of the Year.

On July 18, 2018, he was hired as Director of Player Development for Indiana University's baseball team.

Willie McCovey

Willie Lee McCovey (January 10, 1938 – October 31, 2018) was an American Major League Baseball first baseman. Known as "Stretch" during his playing days, and later also nicknamed "Mac" and "Willie Mac," he is best known for his long tenure as one of the sport's greatest stars with the San Francisco Giants.

Over a 22-year career between 1959 and 1980 he played 19 seasons with the Giants and three more for the San Diego Padres and Oakland Athletics. A fearsome left-handed hitter, he was a six-time All-Star, three-time home run champion, MVP, and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1986 in his first year of eligibility, only the 16th man so honored.

McCovey was known as a dead-pull line drive hitter, causing some teams to employ a shift against him. Seventh on baseball's all-time home run list when he retired, McCovey was called "the scariest hitter in baseball" by pitcher Bob Gibson, seconded by similarly feared slugger Reggie Jackson. McCovey lashed 521 home runs, 231 launched in Candlestick Park, the most there by any player. One on September 16, 1966, was described as the longest ever hit in that stadium.

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