List of Major League Baseball career on-base percentage leaders

In baseball statistics, on-base percentage (OBP) is a measure of how often a batter reaches base for any reason other than a fielding error, fielder's choice, dropped or uncaught third strike, fielder's obstruction, or catcher's interference. OBP is calculated in Major League Baseball (MLB) by dividing the sum of hits, walks, and times hit by a pitch by the sum of at-bats, walks, times hit by pitch and sacrifice flies.[1] A hitter with a .400 on-base percentage is considered to be great[2] and rare;[3] only 55 players in MLB history with at least 3,000 career plate appearances (PA) have maintained such an OBP. Left fielder Ted Williams, who played 19 seasons for the Boston Red Sox, has the highest career on-base percentage, .4817, in MLB history.[4] Williams led the American League (AL) in on-base percentage in twelve seasons, the most such seasons for any player in the major leagues.[4][5] Barry Bonds led the National League (NL) in ten seasons, a NL record.[5][6] Williams also posted the then-highest single-season on-base percentage of .5528 in 1941, a record that stood for 61 years until Bonds broke it with a .5817 OBP in 2002.[7] Bonds broke his own record in 2004, setting the current single-season mark of .6094.[7]

Mickey Cochrane is the only catcher and Arky Vaughan is the only shortstop with a career mark of at least .400.[8][9] Of the 43 players eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame with a career on-base percentage of .400 or higher, 27 have been elected. Players are eligible for the Hall of Fame if they have played at least 10 major league seasons, have been either retired for five seasons or deceased for six months, and have not been banned from MLB.[10] These requirements leave 6 living players ineligible who have played in the past 5 seasons; 5 players (Bill Joyce, Ferris Fain, Jake Stenzel, Bill Lange, and George Selkirk) who did not play 10 seasons in MLB; and Shoeless Joe Jackson, who was banned for his role in the Black Sox Scandal.[11]

Ted Williams BBall Digest May 1949 raw
Ted Williams has the highest career on-base percentage in MLB history, led the American League in 12 seasons (also a record), and held the single-season on-base percentage record for 61 years.

Key

Rank Rank amongst leaders in career on-base percentage. A blank field indicates a tie.
Player Name of the player.
OBP Total career on-base percentage.
* Denotes elected to National Baseball Hall of Fame.
Bold Denotes active player.[note 1]

List

Joey Votto and Matt Wieters on June 25, 2011
Joey Votto, the active leader in career on-base percentage and 16th all-time.
  • Stats updated as July 20, 2019.
Rank Player OBP
1 Ted Williams * .4817
2 Babe Ruth * .4739
3 John McGraw * .4657
4 Billy Hamilton * .4552
5 Lou Gehrig * .4474
6 Barry Bonds .4443
7 Bill Joyce .4349
8 Rogers Hornsby * .4337
9 Ty Cobb * .4330
10 Jimmie Foxx * .4283
11 Tris Speaker * .4279
12 Eddie Collins * .4244
13 Ferris Fain .4241
14 Dan Brouthers * .4234
15 Max Bishop .4230
16 Joey Votto .4228
17 Shoeless Joe Jackson .4227
18 Mickey Mantle * .4205
19 Mickey Cochrane * .4192
20 Frank Thomas * .4191
21 Mike Trout .4189
22 Edgar Martínez * .4178
23 Stan Musial * .4167
24 Cupid Childs .4157
25 Wade Boggs * .4150
26 Jesse Burkett * .4149
27 Todd Helton .4140
Mel Ott * .4140
29 Roy Thomas .4135
30 Lefty O'Doul .4133
31 Hank Greenberg * .4118
32 Ed Delahanty * .4113
33 Manny Ramirez .4106
34 Charlie Keller .4099
35 Eddie Stanky .4098
36 Harry Heilmann * .4092
37 Jackie Robinson * .4089
38 Roy Cullenbine .4082
39 Jake Stenzel .4078
40 Jeff Bagwell * .4076
41 Denny Lyons .4074
42 Riggs Stephenson .4065
43 Lance Berkman .4060
44 Arky Vaughan * .4058
45 Joe Harris .4044
46 Paul Waner * .4043
47 Charlie Gehringer * .4036
48 Joe Cunningham .4035
49 Pete Browning .4028
50 Lu Blue .4022
Rank Player OBP
51 Jim Thome* .4019
52 Joe Kelley * .4017
53 Rickey Henderson * .4012
54 Chipper Jones* .4011
55 Larry Walker .4002
56 Bill Lange .4001
57 Brian Giles .3998
George Selkirk .3998
59 Luke Appling * .3994
60 Jason Giambi .3993
61 Nick Johnson .3989
62 Ross Youngs * .3985
63 Joe DiMaggio * .3983
Elmer Valo .3983
65 Ralph Kiner * .3980
John Olerud .3980
67 Mike Smith .3977
68 Ed Morgan .3975
69 Johnny Mize * .3971
70 Earle Combs * .3969
Roger Connor * .3969
72 John Kruk .3966
73 Richie Ashburn * .3964
74 Mike Hargrove .3958
75 Hack Wilson * .3951
76 Bobby Abreu .3950
77 Earl Averill * .3947
78 Johnny Pesky .3943
79 Mark McGwire .3941
80 Cap Anson * .3940
Frank Chance * .3940
Stan Hack .3940
Eddie Yost .3940
84 Ken Williams .3933
85 Miguel Cabrera .3931
Wally Schang .3931
87 Rod Carew * .3930
Gary Sheffield .3930
89 Bob Johnson .3928
90 Paul Goldschmidt .3927
Bill Terry * .3927
92 George Grantham .3924
Tip O'Neill .3924
94 Jack Fournier .3921
Joe Morgan * .3921
96 Mike Tiernan .3919
97 Honus Wagner * .3911
98 Joe Sewell * .3909
99 Hughie Jennings * .3907
100 Augie Galan .3904

See also

Notes

  1. ^ A player is considered inactive if he has announced his retirement or not played for a full season.

References

General
  • "Career Leaders & Records for On-Base%". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 10, 2015.
Specific
  1. ^ "Official Rules: 10.00 The Official Scorer". MLB.com. Retrieved January 15, 2010.
  2. ^ Verducci, Tom (April 5, 2004). "Smart Stats, Dumb Stats". CNN Sports Illustrated. Retrieved January 14, 2010.
  3. ^ Lewis, Michael (2003). Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game. United States: W.W. Norton & Company Inc. p. 127. ISBN 0-393-05765-8.
  4. ^ a b "Ted Williams Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 14, 2010.
  5. ^ a b "Yearly League Leaders & Records for On-Base%". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 14, 2010.
  6. ^ "Barry Bonds Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 14, 2010.
  7. ^ a b "Single-Season Leaders & Records for On-Base%". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 14, 2010.
  8. ^ "Mickey Cochrane Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 14, 2010.
  9. ^ "Arky Vaughan Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 14, 2010.
  10. ^ "Rules for Election: BBWAA". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved June 21, 2010.
  11. ^ Neyer, Rob (August 2, 2001). "Say it ain't so ... for Joe and the Hall". ESPN Classic. ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved January 15, 2010.
Base on balls

A base on balls (BB), also known as a walk, occurs in baseball when a batter receives four pitches that the umpire calls balls, and is in turn awarded first base without the possibility of being called out. The base on balls is defined in Section 2.00 of baseball's Official Rules, and further detail is given in 6.08(a). It is, however, considered a faux pas for a professional player to actually walk to first base; the batter-runner and any advancing runners normally jog on such a play.The term "base on balls" distinguishes a walk from the other manners in which a batter can be awarded first base without liability to be put out (e.g., hit by pitch (HBP), catcher's interference). Though a base on balls, catcher's interference, or a batter hit by a pitched ball all result in the batter (and possibly runners on base) being awarded a base, the term "walk" usually refers only to a base on balls, and not the other methods of reaching base without the bat touching the ball. An important difference is that for a hit batter or catcher's interference, the ball is dead and no one may advance unless forced; the ball is live after a walk (see below for details).

A batter who draws a base on balls is commonly said to have been "walked" by the pitcher. When the batter is walked, runners advance one base without liability to be put out only if forced to vacate their base to allow the batter to take first base. If a batter draws a walk with the bases loaded, all preceding runners are forced to advance, including the runner on third base who is forced to home plate to score a run; when a run is forced on a walk, the batter is credited with an RBI per rule 10.04.Receiving a base on balls does not count as a hit or an at bat for a batter but does count as a time on base and a plate appearance. Therefore, a base on balls does not affect a player's batting average, but it can increase his on-base percentage.A hit by pitch is not counted statistically as a walk, though the effect is mostly the same, with the batter receiving a free pass to first base. One exception is that on a HBP (hit-by-pitch), the ball is dead. On a HBP, any runners attempting to steal on the play must return to their original base unless forced to the next base anyway. When a walk occurs, the ball is still live: any runner not forced to advance may nevertheless attempt to advance at his own risk, which might occur on a steal play, passed ball, or wild pitch. Also, because a ball is live when a base on balls occurs, runners on base forced to advance one base may attempt to advance beyond one base, at their own risk. The batter-runner himself may attempt to advance beyond first base, at his own risk. Rule 6.08 addresses this matter as well. An attempt to advance an additional base beyond the base awarded might occur when ball four is a passed ball or a wild pitch.

Edgar Martínez

Edgar Martínez (born January 2, 1963), nicknamed "Gar" and "Papi", is a Puerto Rican professional baseball player and coach. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a designated hitter and third baseman for the Seattle Mariners from 1987 through 2004. He served as the Mariners' hitting coach from 2015 through 2018.

Martínez grew up in Dorado, Puerto Rico. Not highly regarded as a prospect, he signed with the Mariners as a free agent in 1982, and was given a small signing bonus. He made his major league debut in 1987, but did not establish himself as a full-time player until 1990. In the 1995 American League Division Series, he hit "The Double", which won the series and increased public support for Mariners baseball as they attempted to fund a new stadium. He continued to play until 2004, when injuries forced him to retire.

Martínez was a seven-time MLB All-Star, five-time Silver Slugger, and two-time batting champion. He is one of 18 MLB players to record a batting average of .300, an on-base percentage of .400, and a slugging percentage of .500 in 5,000 or more plate appearances. The Mariners retired his uniform number and inducted him into the Seattle Mariners Hall of Fame. Martínez was elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2019.

Jake Stenzel

Jacob Charles Stenzel (June 24, 1867 – January 6, 1919) was an American professional baseball player. He played as a center fielder in Major League Baseball from 1890 to 1899 for the Chicago Colts, Pittsburgh Pirates, Baltimore Orioles, St. Louis Browns / Perfectos, and Cincinnati Reds. Stenzel was 5 feet 10 inches (1.78 m) tall and weighed 168 pounds (76 kg).

Jesse Burkett

Jesse Cail Burkett (December 4, 1868 – May 27, 1953), nicknamed "Crab", was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball from 1890 to 1905. He batted over .400 twice. After his playing career, Burkett managed in the minor leagues. He was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1946.

Jimmie Foxx

James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967), nicknamed "Double X" and "The Beast", was an American professional baseball first baseman who played 20 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Athletics, Boston Red Sox, Chicago Cubs, and Philadelphia Phillies. His most productive years were with the Philadelphia Athletics and the Boston Red Sox, where he hit 30 or more home runs in 12 consecutive seasons and drove in more than 100 runs in 13 consecutive years.

Foxx became the second player in MLB history to hit 500 career home runs, after Babe Ruth. Attaining that plateau at age 32 years 336 days, he held the record for youngest to reach 500 for sixty-eight years, until superseded by Alex Rodriguez in 2007. His three career Most Valuable Player awards are tied for second all-time. Foxx was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1951.

Joe DiMaggio

Joseph Paul DiMaggio (November 25, 1914 – March 8, 1999), nicknamed "Joltin' Joe" and "The Yankee Clipper", was an American baseball center fielder who played his entire 13-year career in Major League Baseball for the New York Yankees. Born to Italian immigrants in California, he is widely considered one of the greatest baseball players of all time, and is perhaps best known for his 56-game hitting streak (May 15 – July 16, 1941), a record that still stands.DiMaggio was a three-time Most Valuable Player Award winner and an All-Star in each of his 13 seasons. During his tenure with the Yankees, the club won ten American League pennants and nine World Series championships. His career nine World Series rings is second only to fellow Yankee Yogi Berra, who won ten.

At the time of his retirement after the 1951 season, he ranked fifth in career home runs (361) and sixth in career slugging percentage (.579). He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1955 and was voted the sport's greatest living player in a poll taken during the baseball centennial year of 1969. His brothers Vince (1912–1986) and Dom (1917–2009) also were major league center fielders. DiMaggio is widely known for his marriage and lifelong devotion to Marilyn Monroe.

Joe Mauer

Joseph Patrick Mauer (born April 19, 1983), is an American former professional baseball catcher, designated hitter, and first baseman, who spent his entire 15-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career with the Minnesota Twins. Mauer is the only catcher in MLB history to win three batting titles, and the only catcher to ever win a batting title in the American League (AL). He also won three consecutive Gold Glove Awards (2008–2010), and the 2009 AL Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award.

Joey Votto

Joseph Daniel Votto (born September 10, 1983) is a Canadian professional baseball first baseman for the Cincinnati Reds of Major League Baseball (MLB). He made his MLB debut with the Reds in 2007.

Votto is a six-time MLB All-Star, a seven-time Tip O'Neill Award winner, and two-time Lou Marsh Trophy winner as Canada's athlete of the year. In 2010, he won the National League (NL) MVP Award and the NL Hank Aaron Award. Among all active players at the end of the 2018 season, he was first in career on-base percentage (.427), second in OPS (.957) and walks (1,104), and fourth in batting average (.311).

Ken Williams (baseball)

Kenneth Roy Williams (June 28, 1890 – January 22, 1959) was an American professional baseball player. He played as an outfielder in Major League Baseball from 1915 to 1929. Williams began his major league career with the Cincinnati Reds before spending the majority of his playing days with the St. Louis Browns, and ended his career playing for the Boston Red Sox. He batted left-handed and threw right-handed. Williams was the first member of Major League Baseball's 30–30 club, for players who have reached the 30 home runs and 30 stolen bases plateaus in the same season.

List of Major League Baseball career batting average leaders

In baseball, the batting average (BA) is defined by the number of hits divided by at bats. It is usually reported to three decimal places and pronounced as if it were multiplied by 1,000: a player with a batting average of .300 is "batting three-hundred." A point (or percentage point) is understood to be .001 . If necessary to break ties, batting averages could be taken to more than three decimal places.

Outfielder Ty Cobb, whose career ended in 1928, has the highest batting average in Major League Baseball (MLB) history. He batted .366 over 24 seasons, mostly with the Detroit Tigers. In addition, he won a record 11 batting titles for leading the American League in BA over the course of an entire season. He batted over .360 in 11 consecutive seasons from 1909 to 1919. Rogers Hornsby has the second highest BA of all-time, at .358. He won seven batting titles in the National League (NL) and has the highest NL average in a single season since 1900, when he batted .424 in 1924. He batted over .370 in six consecutive seasons.Shoeless Joe Jackson is the only other player to finish his career with a batting average over .350. He batted .356 over 13 seasons before he was permanently suspended from organized baseball in 1921 for his role in the Black Sox Scandal. Lefty O'Doul first came to the major leagues as a pitcher, but after developing a sore arm, he converted to an outfielder and won two batting titles. The fifth player on the list, and the last with at least a .345 BA, is Ed Delahanty. Delahanty's career was cut short when he fell into the Niagara Falls and died during the 1903 season.The last player to bat .400 in a season, Ted Williams, ranks tied for seventh on the all-time career BA list. Babe Ruth hit for a career .342 average and is tenth on the list. A player must have a minimum of 3,000 plate appearances in order to qualify for the list.

List of Major League Baseball career hits leaders

Below is the list of the 285 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 2,000 hit milestone during their career in MLB.

Pete Rose holds the Major League record for most career hits, with 4,256. Rose and Ty Cobb second most, are the only players with 4,000 or more career hits. George Davis was the first switch hitter to collect 2,000 hits, doing so during the 1902 season.

List of Major League Baseball career runs batted in leaders

The following is a list of Major League Baseball players who have reached the 1,000 runs batted in (RBIs) milestone. RBIs are usually accumulated by a batter in baseball by successfully allowing a runner on base to score as a result of making contact at-bat (except in certain situations, such as when an error is made on the play or during a double play), though a batter is credited with an RBI if a run scores as a result of his reaching first base with the bases loaded as a result of either a base on balls (walk), or being hit by a pitch, or interference. Albert Pujols is the only active top five RBI player in 2019.

List of Major League Baseball career runs scored leaders

Listed are all Major League Baseball (MLB) players with 1,000 or more career runs scored. Players in bold face are active as of the 2018 Major League Baseball season.

Mike Trout

Michael Nelson Trout (born August 7, 1991) is an American professional baseball center fielder for the Los Angeles Angels of Major League Baseball (MLB). Trout is a eight-time MLB All-Star, received the American League (AL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) award in 2014 and 2016 (finishing second in the 2012, 2013, 2015, and 2018 votes), and is a six-time winner of the Silver Slugger Award. He is nicknamed "The Millville Meteor."

The Angels selected Trout in the first round of the 2009 MLB draft. He made a brief major league appearance in 2011 before becoming a regular player for the Angels the subsequent season, and won the 2012 AL Rookie of the Year Award unanimously.

Trout's athleticism on the field has received praise from both the mainstream media and sabermetricians. He is regarded as one of the most outstanding young players in the history of baseball, as well as one of the best current players in all of MLB. Trout led the American League in wins above replacement (WAR) in each of his first five full seasons (according to Fangraphs and Baseball-Reference.com).Trout has led the American League in runs (2012–14, 2016) and times on base (2013, 2015–16, 2018) four times. As of 2018, he led all active major league ballplayers in career slugging percentage (.573), on base plus slugging (.990), and stolen base percentage (84.75%), and was second in career on base percentage (.416). In 2019, he signed a 12-year, $426 million contract with the Angels, the richest contract in the history of North American sports.

Paul Goldschmidt

Paul Edward Goldschmidt (born September 10, 1987), nicknamed "Goldy", is an American professional baseball first baseman for the St. Louis Cardinals of Major League Baseball (MLB). He made his MLB debut with the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2011. Prior to playing professionally, Goldschmidt played baseball for The Woodlands High School and Texas State Bobcats.

Goldschmidt was lightly recruited out of The Woodlands. After playing at Texas State, the Diamondbacks selected him in the eighth round of the 2009 MLB draft. He rose through the minor leagues, reaching the major leagues on August 1, 2011. The Diamondbacks traded him to the Cardinals during the 2018–19 offseason.

Goldschmidt is a six-time MLB All-Star. He led the National League in home runs and runs batted in during the 2013 season. He has won the National League (NL) Hank Aaron Award, Gold Glove Award, and Silver Slugger Award. Goldschmidt has twice finished runner-up for the NL Major League Baseball Most Valuable Player Award, in 2013 and 2015.

Shoeless Joe Jackson

Joseph Jefferson Jackson (July 16, 1887 – December 5, 1951), nicknamed "Shoeless Joe", was an American star outfielder who played Major League Baseball (MLB) in the early 1900s. He is remembered for his performance on the field and for his alleged association with the Black Sox Scandal, in which members of the 1919 Chicago White Sox participated in a conspiracy to fix the World Series. As a result of Jackson's association with the scandal, Kenesaw Mountain Landis, Major League Baseball's first commissioner, banned Jackson from playing after the 1920 season despite exceptional play in the 1919 World Series, leading both teams in several statistical categories and setting a World Series record with 12 base hits. Since then, Jackson's guilt has been fiercely debated with new accounts claiming his innocence, urging Major League Baseball to reconsider his banishment. As a result of the scandal, Jackson's career was abruptly halted in his prime, ensuring him a place in baseball lore.

Jackson played for three Major League teams during his 12-year career. He spent 1908–1909 as a member of the Philadelphia Athletics and 1910 with the minor league New Orleans Pelicans before joining the Cleveland Naps at the end of the 1910 season. He remained in Cleveland through the first part of 1915; he played the remainder of the 1915 season through 1920 with the Chicago White Sox. Later in life, Jackson played ball under assumed names throughout the south, including the 71st Service squadron in 1934 and winning the league title.

Jackson, who played left field for most of his career, currently has the third-highest career batting average in major league history. In 1911, Jackson hit for a .408 average. It is still the sixth-highest single-season total since 1901, which marked the beginning of the modern era for the sport. His average that year also set the record for batting average in a single season by a rookie. Babe Ruth said that he modeled his hitting technique after Jackson's.Jackson still holds the Indians and White Sox franchise records for both triples in a season and career batting average. In 1999, he ranked number 35 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players and was nominated as a finalist for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. The fans voted him as the 12th-best outfielder of all-time. He also ranks 33rd on the all-time list for non-pitchers according to the win shares formula developed by Bill James.

Stan Musial

Stanley Frank Musial (; born Stanisław Franciszek Musiał; November 21, 1920 – January 19, 2013), nicknamed Stan the Man, was an American baseball outfielder and first baseman. He spent 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) playing for the St. Louis Cardinals, from 1941 to 1944 and 1946 to 1963. Widely considered to be one of the greatest and most consistent hitters in baseball history, Musial was a first-ballot inductee into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1969, and was also selected to the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame in the inaugural class of 2014.

Musial batted .331 over the course of his career and set National League (NL) records for career hits (3,630), runs batted in (1,951), games played (3,026), at bats (10,972), runs scored (1,949) and doubles (725). His 475 career home runs then ranked second in NL history behind Mel Ott's total of 511. His 6,134 total bases remained a major league record until surpassed by Hank Aaron, and his hit total still ranks fourth all-time, and is the highest by any player who spent his career with only one team. A seven-time batting champion with identical totals of 1,815 hits at home and 1,815 hits on the road, he was named the National League's (NL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) three times and led St. Louis to three World Series championships. He also shares the major league record for the most All-Star Games played (24) with Hank Aaron and Willie Mays. Musial was born in Donora, Pennsylvania, where he frequently played baseball informally or in organized settings, and eventually played on the baseball team at Donora High School.

Signed to a professional contract by the St. Louis Cardinals as a pitcher in 1938, Musial had arm problems and performed erratically on the mound for two seasons. On the recommendation of minor league manager Dickie Kerr, Musial was converted into an outfielder and made his major league debut in 1941.

Noted for his unique batting stance, he quickly established himself as a consistent and productive hitter. In his first full season, 1942, the Cardinals won the World Series. The following year, he led the NL in six different offensive categories and earned his first MVP award. He was also named to the NL All-Star squad for the first time; he appeared in every All-Star game in every subsequent season he played. Musial won his second World Series championship in 1944, then missed the entire 1945 season while serving in the Navy.

After completing his military service during the war, Musial returned to baseball in 1946 and resumed his consistent hitting. That year he earned his second MVP award and third World Series title. His third MVP award came in 1948, when he finished one home run short of winning baseball's Triple Crown. After struggling offensively in 1959, Musial used a personal trainer to help maintain his productivity until he decided to retire in 1963. At the time of his retirement, he held or shared 17 major league records, 29 National League records, and nine All-Star Game records. Ironically, in 1964, the season following his retirement, the Cardinals went on to defeat the New York Yankees in an epic 7-game clash, for St. Louis' first World Series championship in nearly two decades (a team which included future Hall of Famer Lou Brock performing what would have likely been Musial's left field duties). In addition to overseeing businesses, such as a restaurant both before and after his playing career, Musial served as the Cardinals' general manager in 1967, winning the pennant and World Series, then quitting that position. He also became noted for his harmonica playing, a skill he acquired during his playing career. Known for his modesty and sportsmanship, Musial was selected for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team in 1999. In February 2011, President Barack Obama presented Musial with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian awards that can be bestowed on a person by the United States government.

Ted Williams

Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002) was an American professional baseball player and manager. He played his entire 19-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career as a left fielder for the Boston Red Sox from 1939 to 1960; his career was interrupted only by mandatory military service during World War II and the Korean War. Nicknamed The Kid, The Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame, and The Thumper, Williams is regarded as one of the greatest hitters in baseball history.

Williams was a nineteen-time All-Star, a two-time recipient of the American League (AL) Most Valuable Player Award, a six-time AL batting champion, and a two-time Triple Crown winner. He finished his playing career with a .344 batting average, 521 home runs, and a .482 on-base percentage, the highest of all time. His career batting average is the highest of any MLB player whose career was played primarily in the live-ball era, and ranks tied for 7th all-time (with Billy Hamilton).

Born and raised in San Diego, Williams played baseball throughout his youth. After joining the Red Sox in 1939, he immediately emerged as one of the sport's best hitters. In 1941, Williams posted a .406 batting average; he is the last MLB player to bat over .400 in a season. He followed this up by winning his first Triple Crown in 1942. Williams was required to interrupt his baseball career in 1943 to serve three years in the United States Navy and Marine Corps during World War II. Upon returning to MLB in 1946, Williams won his first AL MVP Award and played in his only World Series. In 1947, he won his second Triple Crown. Williams was returned to active military duty for portions of the 1952 and 1953 seasons to serve as a Marine combat aviator in the Korean War. In 1957 and 1958 at the ages of 39 and 40, respectively, he was the AL batting champion for the fifth and sixth time.

Williams retired from playing in 1960. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1966, in his first year of eligibility. Williams managed the Washington Senators/Texas Rangers franchise from 1969 to 1972. An avid sport fisherman, he hosted a television program about fishing, and was inducted into the IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame. Williams' involvement in the Jimmy Fund helped raise millions in dollars for cancer care and research. In 1991 President George H. W. Bush presented Williams with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award bestowed by the United States government. He was selected for the Major League Baseball All-Time Team in 1997 and the Major League Baseball All-Century Team in 1999.

Todd Helton

Todd Lynn Helton (born August 20, 1973) is an American former professional baseball first baseman who played his entire 17-year career for the Colorado Rockies of Major League Baseball (MLB). A five-time All-Star, four-time Silver Slugger, and three-time Gold Glove Award winner, Helton holds the Colorado Rockies club records for hits (2,519), home runs (369), doubles (592), walks (1,335), runs scored (1,401), runs batted in (RBI, with 1,406), games played (2,247), and total bases (4,292), among others.Each season from 1999–2004, Helton met or exceeded all of the following totals: .320 batting average, 39 doubles, 30 home runs, 107 runs scored, 96 RBI, .577 slugging percentage and .981 on-base plus slugging. In 2000, he won the batting title with a .372 average, and also led MLB with a .698 slugging percentage, 59 doubles, 147 RBI and the National League with 216 hits. Helton amassed his 2,000th career hit against the Atlanta Braves on May 19, 2009, and his 2,500th against the Cincinnati Reds on September 1, 2013.

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