List of Major League Baseball career intentional bases on balls leaders

In baseball, an intentional base on balls, usually referred to as an intentional walk and denoted in baseball scorekeeping by IBB, is a base on balls (walk) issued to a batter by a pitcher with the intent of removing the batter's opportunity to swing at the pitched ball. A pitch that is intentionally thrown far outside the strike zone for this purpose is referred to as an intentional ball.

Barry Bonds is the all-time leader in intentional bases on balls with 688 career. Bonds is the only player to be intentionally walked more than 400 times. Albert Pujols is second all time and the active leader with 311 career intentional bases on balls and the only other player to be intentionally walked over 300 times.

BarryBonds1993
Barry Bonds, the all-time leader in intentional bases on balls.

Key

Rank Rank amongst leaders in career intentional walks. A blank field indicates a tie.
Player (2019 IBBs) Number of intentional walks hit during the 2019 Major League Baseball season.
IBB Total career intentional walks
* denotes elected to National Baseball Hall of Fame.
Bold denotes active player.[a]

List

DSC05863 Albert Pujols
Albert Pujols, the active leader and second all-time in career intentional bases on balls.
  • Stats updated as of June 24, 2019.
Rank Player (2019 IBBs) IBB
1 Barry Bonds 688
2 Albert Pujols (1) 311
3 Stan Musial * 298
4 Hank Aaron * 293
5 Willie McCovey * 260
6 Vladimir Guerrero * 250
7 Ken Griffey Jr. * 246
8 Ted Williams * 243
9 Miguel Cabrera (2) 232
10 George Brett * 229
11 Willie Stargell * 227
12 Eddie Murray * 222
13 Frank Robinson * 218
14 Manny Ramirez 216
15 Willie Mays * 214
16 David Ortiz 209
17 Tony Gwynn * 203
18 Ernie Banks * 202
19 Mike Schmidt * 201
20 Rusty Staub 193
21 Carl Yastrzemski * 190
22 Chili Davis 188
Ted Simmons 188
24 Harold Baines * 187
25 Carlos Delgado 186
26 Todd Helton 185
27 Billy Williams * 182
28 Ichiro Suzuki 181
29 Wade Boggs * 180
30 Chipper Jones * 177
31 Jim Thome * 173
32 Rafael Palmeiro 172
Dave Winfield * 172
34 Fred McGriff 171
35 Dave Parker 170
36 Frank Thomas * 168
37 Roberto Clemente * 167
Pete Rose 167
39 Prince Fielder 164
Reggie Jackson * 164
41 Lance Berkman 160
Harmon Killebrew * 160
43 Dale Murphy 159
44 Adrian Gonzalez 158
45 John Olerud 157
46 Jeff Bagwell * 155
Will Clark 155
48 Orlando Cepeda * 154
Ryan Howard 154
Duke Snider * 154
Rank Player (2019 IBBs) IBB
Sammy Sosa 154
52 Luis Gonzalez 150
Mark McGwire 150
Tony Pérez * 150
55 Mickey Mantle * 148
Tim Raines * 148
57 Mike Piazza * 146
58 Joe Mauer 145
59 Rod Carew * 144
Garry Templeton 144
Mo Vaughn 144
62 Andre Dawson * 143
63 José Cruz 142
Ted Kluszewski 142
Eddie Mathews * 142
66 Darrell Evans 141
67 Boog Powell 140
Joey Votto (2) 140
69 Dick Allen 138
70 Don Mattingly 136
71 Johnny Bench * 135
Frank Howard 135
73 Al Kaline * 133
74 Robin Ventura 132
75 Tony Oliva 131
Darryl Strawberry 131
77 Keith Hernandez 130
Gary Sheffield 130
79 Ron Fairly 129
80 Bobby Bonilla 128
81 Jack Clark 127
Joe Torre * 127
83 Ken Singleton 125
84 Lou Brock * 124
85 Leo Cárdenas 122
Adam Dunn 122
87 Bill Madlock 121
Bill Nicholson 121
89 Brooks Robinson * 120
90 Víctor Martínez 119
Tim McCarver 119
Al Oliver 119
93 Johnny Edwards 118
94 Ron Cey 117
Del Crandall 117
Larry Walker 117
97 Bobby Abreu 115
Pedro Guerrero 115
Reggie Smith 115
100 Brian Giles 114
Mark Grace 114

Notes

  1. ^ A player is considered inactive if he has announced his retirement or not played for a full season.

References

Joey Votto

Joseph Daniel Votto (born September 10, 1983) is a Canadian professional baseball first baseman for the Cincinnati Reds of Major League Baseball (MLB). He made his MLB debut with the Reds in 2007.

Votto is a six-time MLB All-Star, a seven-time Tip O'Neill Award winner, and two-time Lou Marsh Trophy winner as Canada's athlete of the year. In 2010, he won the National League (NL) MVP Award and the NL Hank Aaron Award. Among all active players at the end of the 2018 season, he was first in career on-base percentage (.427), second in OPS (.957) and walks (1,104), and fourth in batting average (.311).

Johnny Bench

Johnny Lee Bench (born December 7, 1947) is an American former professional baseball catcher who played in the Major Leagues for the Cincinnati Reds from 1967 to 1983 and is a member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Bench is a 14-time All-Star selection and a two-time National League Most Valuable Player. He was a key member of the Big Red Machine that won six division titles, four National League pennants, and two consecutive World Series championships. Known for his prowess on both offense and defense, ESPN has called him the greatest catcher in baseball history.

Mike Piazza

Michael Joseph Piazza (; born September 4, 1968) is a former American professional baseball catcher who played 16 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB), from 1992 to 2007. He played most notably for the New York Mets and Los Angeles Dodgers, while also having brief stints with the Florida Marlins, San Diego Padres, and Oakland Athletics. A 12-time All-Star and 10-time Silver Slugger Award winner at catcher, Piazza produced strong offensive numbers at his position; in his career, he recorded 427 home runs—a record 396 of which were hit as catcher—along with a .308 batting average and 1,335 runs batted in (RBIs).

Piazza was drafted by the Dodgers in the 1988 MLB draft as a favor from Tommy Lasorda to Piazza's father. Initially a first baseman, Piazza converted to catcher in the minor leagues at Lasorda's suggestion to improve his chances of being promoted. He made his major league debut in 1992 and the following year was named the National League (NL) Rookie of the Year and was an All-Star for the first of 10 consecutive seasons. Piazza immediately impressed with his ability to hit for power and average. His best year as a Dodger came in 1997 when he batted .362, hit 40 home runs, and had 124 RBIs, leading to a runner-up finish in voting for the NL Most Valuable Player Award. In 1998, he was traded to the Marlins and then a week later to the Mets, with whom he spent most of the remainder of his career. He helped the Mets reach the 2000 World Series, the only World Series appearance of his career. After the 2005 season, Piazza left the Mets to play one season each for the Padres and Athletics before retiring after the 2007 season.

Piazza is regarded as one of the best offensive catchers in baseball history. He had at least one RBI in 15 consecutive games for the Mets in 2000, the second-longest RBI streak ever. In 2013, the Mets inducted Piazza into the New York Mets Hall of Fame. In 2016, Piazza was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame as a Met, receiving 83% of the vote.Piazza is owner of the Italian soccer team A.C. Reggiana 1919, which played for two seasons (2017–2018) in Serie C under his leadership before its non-registration due to continued financial troubles.

General
Batting
leaders
Baserunning
leaders
Pitching
leaders
Fielding
leaders
Managing
records
Multiple stat
records
Other
Batting
Base running
Pitching
Fielding
Sabermetrics

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.