List of Major League Baseball career hit by pitch leaders

In baseball, hit by pitch (HBP) is a situation in which a batter or his clothing or equipment (other than his bat) is struck directly by a pitch from the pitcher; the batter is called a hit batsman (HB). A hit batsman is awarded first base, provided that (in the plate umpire's judgment) he made an honest effort to avoid the pitch, although failure to do so is rarely called by an umpire. Being hit by a pitch is often caused by a batter standing too close to, or "crowding", home plate.

Below is the list of the top 100 Major League Baseball players who have been hit by a pitch the most during their MLB careers.

Hughie Jennings holds the Major League record for most hit by pitches, getting hit 287 times in his career. Craig Biggio (285), Tommy Tucker (272), Don Baylor (267), Jason Kendall (254), Ron Hunt (243), Dan McGann (230), and Chase Utley (204) are the only other players to be hit by 200 or more pitches during their careers.

Hughie Jennings (2).jpeg
Hughie Jennings holds the record for most times hit by a pitch

Key

Rank Rank amongst leaders in career hit batsmen. A blank field indicates a tie.
Player (2019 HBP) Number of times hit by pitch during the 2019 Major League Baseball season.
HBP Total career times hit by pitch.
* Denotes elected to National Baseball Hall of Fame.
Bold Denotes active player.[note 1]

List

Choo Shin-Soo in Texas Rangers
Shin-Soo Choo, the active leader and tied for 24th all time in being hit by pitches.
  • Stats updated as of July 13, 2019.
Rank Player (2019 HBP) HBP
1 Hughie Jennings * 287
2 Craig Biggio * 285
3 Tommy Tucker 272
4 Don Baylor 267
5 Jason Kendall 254
6 Ron Hunt 243
7 Dan McGann 230
8 Chase Utley 204
9 Frank Robinson * 198
10 Minnie Miñoso 192
11 Jake Beckley * 183
12 Jason Giambi 180
13 Andrés Galarraga 178
14 Alex Rodriguez 176
15 Curt Welch 173
16 Carlos Delgado 172
17 Derek Jeter 170
18 Kid Elberfeld 165
19 Fernando Viña 157
20 Brady Anderson 154
Fred Clarke * 154
22 Chet Lemon 151
23 Jose Guillen 145
24 Shin-Soo Choo (11) 143
David Eckstein 143
Carlton Fisk * 143
27 Nellie Fox * 142
28 Art Fletcher 141
29 Bill Dahlen 140
30 Chuck Knoblauch 139
32 Larry Walker 138
32 Frank Chance 137
32 Gary Sheffield 135
34 Dummy Hoy 134
Reed Johnson 134
Rank Player (2019 HBP) HBP
Nap Lajoie * 134
John McGraw * 134
Rickie Weeks Jr. 134
39 Steve Brodie 132
Damion Easley 132
Anthony Rizzo (14) 132
42 Brian Downing 129
Willie Keeler * 129
A. J. Pierzynski 129
45 Jeff Bagwell * 128
46 Carlos Quentin 127
Aramis Ramírez 127
Scott Rolen 127
49 Aaron Rowand 126
50 Jeff Kent 125
Honus Wagner * 125
52 Prince Fielder 124
Matt Holliday (0) 124
54 Miguel Tejada 122
55 Buck Herzog 120
56 Melvin Mora 117
57 Jimmy Dykes 115
Sherm Lollar 115
59 Frankie Crosetti 114
Bill Freehan 114
61 Carlos Gómez (3) 112
Josh Willingham 112
63 Andre Dawson * 111
Steve Evans 111
Luis Gonzalez 111
Alex Gordon (12) 111
Mark Teixeira 111
68 George Burns 110
Derek Dietrich (17) 110
70 Sherry Magee 109
Rank Player (2019 HBP) HBP
Manny Ramírez 109
72 David DeJesus 108
Bill Joyce 108
Mo Vaughn 108
75 Jon Jay (1) 107
Jason LaRue 107
Pete Rose 107
Wally Schang 107
79 Barry Bonds 106
Albert Pujols (2) 106
81 Dan Brouthers * 105
Mark Grudzielanek 105
Russell Martin (6) 105
84 Paul Konerko 104
Kevin Youkilis 104
86 Vladimir Guerrero * 103
Tris Speaker * 103
88 Orlando Cepeda * 102
Starling Marte (7) 102
Juan Pierre 102
91 Adam Jones (6) 101
Henry Larkin 101
Plácido Polanco 101
94 Edwin Encarnación (6) 100
95 Elmer Flick * 99
Bucky Harris * 99
Kurt Suzuki (3) 99
Eddie Yost 99
99 Rickey Henderson * 98
100 Dick Bartell 97
Adrian Beltre 97
Torii Hunter 97
Andruw Jones 97
Mike Macfarlane 97
Dick Padden 97

Notes

  1. ^ A player is considered inactive if he has announced his retirement or not played for a full season.

See also

External links

Albert Pujols

José Alberto Pujols Alcántara (born January 16, 1980) is a Dominican-American professional baseball first baseman and designated hitter for the Los Angeles Angels of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played 11 seasons for the St. Louis Cardinals, with whom he was a three-time National League (NL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) (2005, 2008, 2009) and nine-time All-Star (2001, 2003–2010). He then was a one-time All-Star additionally with the Angels in 2015. A right-handed batter and thrower, Pujols stands 6 feet 3 inches (1.91 m) tall and weighs 235 pounds (107 kg).

Pujols was born in the Dominican Republic and moved to the United States in 1996. After one season of college baseball, he was selected by the Cardinals in the 13th round of the 1999 MLB draft. As a rookie for the Cardinals in 2001, he was unanimously voted the NL Rookie of the Year. Pujols played for the Cardinals, contributing to two World Series championships in 2006 and 2011. After the 2011 season, Pujols became a free agent and signed a 10-year contract with the Angels.

Pujols was, at the height of his career, a highly regarded hitter who showed a "combination of contact hitting ability, patience and raw power." He is a six-time Silver Slugger who has twice led the NL in home runs, and he has also led the NL once each in batting average, doubles and RBI. He is significantly above-average in career regular season batting average (.301), walk rate (10.9 percent) and Isolated Power (.251). He holds the MLB all-time record for most times grounded into a double play (376). With 14 seasons of 100 or more RBI produced, he is tied with Alex Rodriguez for the most in MLB history. Pujols got his 3,000th career hit in 2018, becoming the 32nd player in MLB history to do so. Pujols also became the fourth member of the 3,000-hit club to also hit 600 home runs, joining Willie Mays, Hank Aaron, and Rodriguez in this exclusive club. Pujols is considered a strong future candidate for the Hall of Fame.

Alex Rodriguez

Alexander Emmanuel Rodriguez (born July 27, 1975), nicknamed "A-Rod", is an American former professional baseball shortstop and third baseman who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB), primarily with the New York Yankees. He also played for the Seattle Mariners and Texas Rangers. Rodriguez began his professional career as one of the sport's most highly touted prospects, and is considered to be one of the greatest baseball players of all time. Rodriguez amassed a .295 batting average, over 600 home runs (696), over 2,000 runs batted in (RBI), over 2,000 runs scored, over 3,000 hits, and over 300 stolen bases, the only player in MLB history to achieve all of those feats. He was also a 14-time All-Star, winning three American League (AL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) Awards, ten Silver Slugger Awards, and two Gold Glove Awards. Rodríguez is also the career record holder for grand slams with 25. He signed two of the most lucrative sports contracts in baseball. In addition to his accomplishments, he also led a controversial career due to some of his behaviors, including the use of performance-enhancing drugs.The Mariners selected Rodriguez first overall in the 1993 MLB draft, and he debuted in the major leagues the following year at the age of 18. In 1996, he became the Mariners' starting shortstop, won the major league batting championship, and finished second in voting for the AL MVP Award. His combination of power, speed, and defense made him a cornerstone of the franchise, but he left the team via free agency after the 2000 season to join the Rangers. The 10-year, $252 million contract he signed was the richest in baseball history at the time. He played at a high level in his three years with Texas, highlighted by his first AL MVP Award win in 2003, but the team failed to make the playoffs during his tenure. Prior to the 2004 season, Rodriguez was traded to the Yankees, for whom he converted to a third baseman, because Derek Jeter was already the Yankees' full-time shortstop. During Rodriguez's career with the Yankees, he was named AL MVP in 2005 and 2007. After opting out of his contract following the 2007 season, Rodriguez signed a new 10-year, $275 million deal with the Yankees, extending his record for the sport's most lucrative contract. He became the youngest player ever to hit 500 home runs, reaching the milestone in 2007. He was part of the Yankees' 2009 World Series championship over the Philadelphia Phillies, which was the first year of the new Yankee Stadium and Rodriguez's only world title. Toward the end of his career, Rodriguez was hampered by hip and knee injuries, which caused him to become exclusively a designated hitter. He played his final game in professional baseball on August 12, 2016.

During a 2007 interview with Katie Couric on 60 Minutes, Rodriguez denied using performance-enhancing drugs. In February 2009, Rodriguez admitted to using steroids, saying he used them from 2001 to 2003 when playing for Rangers due to "an enormous amount of pressure" to perform. While recovering from a hip injury in 2013, Rodriguez made headlines by feuding with team management over his rehabilitation and for having allegedly obtained performance-enhancing drugs as part of the Biogenesis baseball scandal. In August 2013, MLB suspended him for 211 games for his involvement in the scandal, but he was allowed to play while appealing the punishment. Had the original suspension been upheld, it would have been the longest non-lifetime suspension in Major League Baseball history. After an arbitration hearing, the suspension was reduced to 162 games, which kept him off the field for the entire 2014 season.After retiring as a player, Rodriguez became a media personality, serving as a broadcaster for Fox Sports 1, a cast member of Shark Tank and a member of the ABC News network. In January 2018, ESPN announced that Rodriguez would be joining the broadcast team of Sunday Night Baseball In January 2017, CNBC announced Rodriguez would be the host of the show Back In The Game, where he would help former athletes make a comeback in their personal lives; the first episode debuted on the network in March 2018.

Aramis Ramírez

Aramis Nin Ramírez (; born June 25, 1978) is a Dominican former professional baseball third baseman, who played 18 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Chicago Cubs, and Milwaukee Brewers. He was named an All-Star three times during his career.

He started his professional career with the Pirates in 1998, before being traded to the Chicago Cubs in 2003. On November 12, 2006, Ramírez signed a five-year deal with the Cubs. On December 12, 2011, he signed a three-year contract with the Milwaukee Brewers. On July 23, 2015, he was traded back to Pittsburgh exactly 12 years after they first traded him, where he would finish the remainder of his final season.

Barry Bonds

Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964) is an American former professional baseball left fielder who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) with the Pittsburgh Pirates and San Francisco Giants. He received a record seven NL MVP awards, eight Gold Glove awards, a record 12 Silver Slugger awards, and 14 All-Star selections. He is considered to be one of the greatest baseball players of all time.Bonds was regarded as an exceptional hitter: he led MLB in on-base plus slugging six times, and placed within the top five hitters in 12 of his 17 qualifying seasons. He holds many MLB hitting records, including most career home runs (762), most home runs in a single season (73, set in 2001) and most career walks.Bonds was also known as a talented all-around baseball player. He won eight Gold Glove awards for his defensive play in the outfield. He stole 514 bases with his baserunning speed, becoming the first and only MLB player to date with at least 500 home runs and 500 stolen bases (no other player has even 400 of each). He is ranked second in career Wins Above Replacement among all major league position players by both Fangraphs and Baseball-Reference.com, behind only Babe Ruth.However, Bonds led a controversial career, notably as a central figure in baseball's steroids scandal. In 2007, he was indicted on charges of perjury and obstruction of justice for allegedly lying to the grand jury during the federal government's investigation of BALCO. The perjury charges against Bonds were dropped and an initial obstruction of justice conviction was overturned in 2015.Bonds became eligible for the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2013; he has not been elected, with his highest share of the vote coming in 2019, his seventh of ten years of eligibility, when he received 59.1%.

Brady Anderson

Brady Kevin Anderson (born January 18, 1964) is a baseball executive and former outfielder. He made his major league debut for the Boston Red Sox on April 4, 1988, and also played for the Baltimore Orioles and Cleveland Indians. He spent the majority of his career as a center fielder and leadoff hitter for the Orioles in the 1990s, where he was a three-time All Star, and, in 1996, became the fifteenth player in major league history to hit 50 home runs in one season. Anderson bats and throws left-handed, stands 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 m) tall, and weighs 199 pounds (90 kg).

A native of Silver Spring, Maryland, Anderson was selected by the Red Sox in the tenth round of the 1985 amateur draft. His 50 home runs in 1996 set an Orioles team record until surpassed by Chris Davis in 2013. With 53 stolen bases in 1992, Anderson became the first player in major league history to have achieved season totals of both 50 home runs and 50 stolen bases. He was inducted into the Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame in 2004. In 2013, he was hired to serve as Vice President of Baseball Operations for the Orioles.

Chase Utley

Chase Cameron Utley (born December 17, 1978) is an American former professional baseball second baseman who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for 16 seasons, primarily for the Philadelphia Phillies. He also played for the Los Angeles Dodgers. He is a six-time All-Star, won a World Series with the Phillies in 2008, and was chosen as the second baseman on the Sports Illustrated All-Decade Team for the 2000s.

He batted left-handed and threw right-handed.

After becoming a permanent fixture as the Phillies' second baseman, Utley demonstrated versatility, spending some time at first base as well. As his fielding has improved over his career, Utley was seen in combination with Jimmy Rollins as one of the best middle-infield combinations in the NL, until Rollins was traded to the Dodgers in the winter of 2014. Utley was considered by fans to be a team leader of the Phillies, alongside Rollins and Ryan Howard, and he has been noted for his leadership qualities with the Dodgers. Utley was known for his quiet understated demeanor, instead setting an example for teammates with his exhaustive preparation in the video room and the batting cage. Utley's seven career World Series home runs are the most for a second baseman, and he shares the single-series postseason record of five home runs with Reggie Jackson and George Springer. He is also noteworthy for having participated in seven no-hitters, of which he was on the winning side in four.

Craig Biggio

Craig Alan Biggio (; born December 14, 1965) is an American former second baseman, outfielder and catcher in Major League Baseball who played his entire career from 1988 through 2007 for the Houston Astros. A seven-time National League (NL) All-Star often regarded as the greatest all-around player in Astros history, he is the only player ever to be named an All-Star at both catcher and second base. With longtime teammates Jeff Bagwell and Lance Berkman, he formed the core of the "Killer B's" who led Houston to six playoff appearances from 1997 to 2005, culminating in the franchise's first World Series appearance in 2005. At the end of his career he ranked sixth in NL history in games played (2,850), fifth in at bats (10,876), twenty-first in hits (3,060), and seventh in runs scored (1,844). His 668 career doubles ranked fifth in major league history, and are the most ever by a right-handed hitter; his 56 doubles in 1999 were the most in the major leagues in 63 years.

Biggio, who batted .300 four times and scored 100 runs eight times, holds Astros franchise records for most career games, at bats, hits, runs scored, doubles, total bases (4,711) and extra base hits (1,014), and ranks second in runs batted in (1,175), walks (1,160) and stolen bases (414). He also holds the NL record for most times leading off a game with a home run (53), and is one of only five players with 250 home runs and 400 steals. A four-time Gold Glove Award winner who led NL second basemen in assists six times and putouts five times, he retired ranking fourth in NL history in games at second base (1,989), sixth in assists (5,448) and fielding percentage (.984), seventh in putouts (3,992) and double plays (1,153), and eighth in total chances (9,596). He was the ninth player in the 3,000 hit club to collect all his hits with one team. Biggio also led the NL in times hit by pitch five times, with his career total of 285 trailing only Hughie Jennings' 287 in major league history.

One of the most admired players of his generation, Biggio received the 2005 Hutch Award for perseverance through adversity and the 2007 Roberto Clemente Award for sportsmanship and community service. The Astros retired the number 7 in his honor the year following his retirement. Since 2008, Biggio has served as special assistant to the general manager of the Astros. He was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2015, and is the first member of the Hall to be depicted in an Astros uniform on his plaque.

Jeff Bagwell

Jeffrey Robert Bagwell (born May 27, 1968) is an American former professional first baseman and coach who spent his entire 15-year Major League Baseball (MLB) playing career with the Houston Astros. Originally a Boston Red Sox fourth-round selection from the University of Hartford as a third baseman in the 1989 amateur draft, he was then traded to the Astros in 1990. The National League (NL) Rookie of the Year in 1991, Bagwell then won the NL Most Valuable Player (MVP) in 1994, was a four-time MLB All-Star, three-time Silver Slugger winner and a Gold Glove recipient. Forming a core part of Astros lineups with Craig Biggio and Lance Berkman given the epithet "Killer B's", Houston finished in first or second place in the National League Central division in 11 of 12 seasons from 1994 to 2005. They qualified for the playoffs six times, culminating in Bagwell's lone World Series appearance in 2005. He was elected to the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2005, and to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2017.

Bagwell was part of the trade that sent relief pitcher Larry Andersen to the Red Sox, now regarded as one of the most lopsided trades in sports history. Andersen pitched just 22 innings for Boston while Bagwell hit 449 home runs for the Astros, the most in club history, among setting numerous other franchise career and single-season records. He excelled at every major aspect of the game, including hitting, on-base ability, running, defense, and throwing. One of the most consistent players of his generation, in each of his first 11 seasons, he produced no fewer than 4.7 wins above replacement (WAR) per Baseball-Reference.com. His 1994 season was perhaps his finest. As the fourth unanimous NL MVP in history, he set the record for fewest plate appearances to reach both 100 runs scored and 100 runs batted in, produced a .750 slugging percentage − the highest in the NL since 1925 − while batting a career-high .368. In 1999, he finished second in the MVP voting, producing his second career 30–30 season.

The only player in MLB history to have six consecutive seasons (1996–2001) with 30 home runs, 100 RBI, 100 runs scored, and 100 walks. Bagwell is just the fifth to achieve 300 home runs, 1,000 RBI, and 1,000 runs scored in his first 10 seasons. He is one of 12 players in history to hit 400 home runs and record an on-base percentage (OBP) of .400, and the only first baseman with at least 400 home runs and 200 stolen bases. Overall, Bagwell batted over .300 six times, had a career OBP of .408 (39th all-time) and a slugging percentage of .540 (32nd all-time). He is the only first baseman to achieve the 30–30 club more than once. His 79.6 career WAR per Baseball-Reference.com ranks sixth all-time among first basemen.

Since his playing career ended, Bagwell has served in sporadic instructor assignments with the Astros, including as hitting coach in 2010.

Mark Teixeira

Mark Charles Teixeira ( tay-SHAIR-ə; born April 11, 1980) is an American former professional baseball first baseman who played 14 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB), primarily with the New York Yankees. He also played for the Texas Rangers, Atlanta Braves and Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. Before his professional career, he played college baseball at Georgia Tech, where in 2001 he won the Dick Howser Trophy as the national collegiate baseball player of the year. One of the most prolific switch hitters in MLB history, Teixeira was an integral part of the Yankees' 27th World Series championship in 2009, leading the American League (AL) in home runs and runs batted in (RBI) while finishing second in the Most Valuable Player Award (MVP) balloting. Teixeira was a three-time All-Star, won five Gold Glove Awards and three Silver Slugger Awards, and also holds the all-time major league record for most games with a home run from both sides of the plate, with 14. He was the fifth switch hitter in MLB history to reach 400 home runs.

Drafted fifth overall by the Texas Rangers in 2001, Teixeira made his MLB debut on Opening Day in 2003, and hit 26 home runs as a rookie. He hit career-highs of 43 home runs and 144 RBI in 2005. The centerpiece of consecutive mid-season trades in 2007 and 2008, the Rangers first sent him to the Braves for a prospect package centered around Elvis Andrus and Matt Harrison. He was later traded in July 2008 to the Los Angeles Angels, where he played for half a season and lost in the first round of the playoffs. In December 2008, he agreed to a lucrative eight-year contract with the Yankees, contributing his most productive season in pinstripes the following year. Injuries limited his effectiveness afterward, including a calf strain in 2012, early season-ending wrist surgery in 2013, various ailments in 2014, a shin fracture in 2015, and neck spasms and torn cartilage in 2016. Teixeira retired at the conclusion of the 2016 season and contract with the Yankees. In each season from 2004 to 2011, Teixeira hit at least 30 home runs with 100 RBI.

Matt Holliday

Matthew Thomas Holliday (born January 15, 1980) is an American professional baseball left fielder and first baseman who is a free agent. He has played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Colorado Rockies, Oakland Athletics, St. Louis Cardinals and New York Yankees. A World Series champion in 2011 with the Cardinals, Holliday, through prodigious hitting contributions, has played a key role in seven postseasons, including the Rockies' first-ever World Series appearance in 2007 and Cardinals' playoff success of the 2010s. His distinctions include a National League (NL) batting championship, the 2007 NL Championship Series Most Valuable Player Award (NLCS MVP), seven All-Star selections, and four Silver Slugger Awards. Other career accomplishments include 300 home runs, more than 2,000 hits, 100 stolen bases, and batting over .300 eight times.

The Colorado Rockies selected Holliday in the seventh round of the 1998 MLB draft from high school in Oklahoma, where he also starred as a highly touted quarterback prospect. He debuted in MLB in 2004, becoming the Rockies' starting left fielder and a middle of the lineup presence. In 2006, he became the 19th player ever to reach 195 hits, 30 home runs, 45 doubles, 115 runs and 110 runs batted in (RBI) in one season. The next season, he won the NL batting title, September National League Player of the Month honors and NLCS MVP as the Rockies won 21 of 22 games at the end of the regular season and in the playoffs en route to their first World Series appearance. In the first of four consecutive NLCS appearances starting in 2011, he batted .435 with a .652 slugging percentage in the 2011 NLCS on his way to winning his first World Series ring with the Cardinals. In 2014, he became just the fifth player in MLB history to amass nine consecutive seasons of at least 20 home runs, 30 doubles, 75 RBI and 80 runs scored each season.

In addition to his presence as a leader on the field, Holliday is active in charity work and assisting his teammates off the field. Thus, the St. Louis chapter of the Baseball Writers' Association of America has awarded him the Darryl Kile Good Guy Award. He is a frequent visitor to children's hospitals. From 2012 to 2016, Holliday co-sponsored a pledge drive for Greater St. Louis hospitals called "Homers for Health," which raised more than $3.7 million. Because of his hitting abilities and strength, he has sometimes been called the "Stillwater Stinger."

Miguel Tejada

Miguel Odalis Tejada (born Tejeda, May 25, 1974) is a Dominican former professional baseball shortstop who played 16 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). He played for six different teams, most notably the Oakland Athletics and Baltimore Orioles, before short stints with the Houston Astros, San Diego Padres, San Francisco Giants, and Kansas City Royals.

Tejada spent his first six seasons in MLB with the Athletics, where he began a streak of 1,152 consecutive games that ended with the Orioles on June 22, 2007. He is a six-time All-Star and a two-time Silver Slugger Award winner. In 2002, he won the American League Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award, and was the 2005 All-Star Game MVP. Tejada's nickname is "La Guagua", which means "the bus" in certain Spanish dialects, as Tejada was known for his ability to drive in runs.

On February 11, 2009, he pleaded guilty to one count of perjury for lying to Congress in his testimony on whether Rafael Palmeiro lied about his steroid use. On August 17, 2013, MLB suspended Tejada for 105 games for violating MLB drug policy. It was the third-longest non-lifetime suspension ever issued by MLB for a drug-related violation.

Scott Rolen

Scott Bruce Rolen (born April 4, 1975) is an American former professional baseball third baseman. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Phillies, St. Louis Cardinals, Toronto Blue Jays and Cincinnati Reds. He was an eight-time Gold Glove winner, seven-time All-Star and the 1997 National League Rookie of the Year.

On July 18, 2018, he was hired as Director of Player Development for Indiana University's baseball team.

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