List of Major League Baseball career OPS leaders

On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic calculated as the sum of a player's on-base percentage and slugging average.[1] The ability of a player both to get on base and to hit for power, two important offensive skills, are represented.

Below is the list of the top 100 Major League Baseball players in career OPS with at least 3,000 career plate appearances.

Babe Ruth is the all-time leader with a career 1.1636 OPS. Ted Williams (1.1155), Lou Gehrig (1.0798), Barry Bonds (1.0512), Jimmie Foxx (1.0376), Hank Greenberg (1.0169), and Rogers Hornsby (1.0103) are the only other players with a career OPS over 1.0000.

Babe Ruth by Paul Thompson, 1920
Babe Ruth, the all-time leader in OPS.

Key

Rank Rank amongst leaders in career OPS. A blank field indicates a tie.
Player Name of the player.
OPS Total career OPS.
* Denotes elected to National Baseball Hall of Fame.
Bold Denotes active player.[note 1]

List

  • Stats updated as of July 18, 2019.
Hank Greenberg 1937 cropped
Hank Greenberg, 6th all time in OPS.
Rank Player OPS
1 Babe Ruth * 1.1636
2 Ted Williams * 1.1155
3 Lou Gehrig * 1.0798
4 Barry Bonds 1.0512
5 Jimmie Foxx * 1.0376
6 Hank Greenberg * 1.0169
7 Rogers Hornsby * 1.0103
8 Mike Trout .9994
9 Manny Ramírez .9960
10 Mark McGwire .9823
11 Mickey Mantle * .9773
12 Joe DiMaggio * .9771
13 Stan Musial * .9757
14 Frank Thomas * .9740
15 Larry Walker .9654
16 Johnny Mize * .9591
17 Jim Thome * .9560
18 Todd Helton .9531
19 Jeff Bagwell * .9480
20 Mel Ott * .9471
21 Ralph Kiner * .9459
22 Lefty O'Doul .9451
23 Joey Votto .9450
24 Ty Cobb * .9446
25 Dan Brouthers * .9435
26 Lance Berkman .9429
27 Willie Mays * .9414
28 Shoeless Joe Jackson .9401
29 Hack Wilson * .9399
30 Miguel Cabrera .9387
31 Albert Belle .9333
Edgar Martínez * .9333
33 Albert Pujols .9314
34 Vladimir Guerrero * .9312
35 David Ortiz .9310
36 Chipper Jones * .9304
37 Alex Rodriguez .9299
38 Harry Heilmann * .9295
39 Carlos Delgado .9293
40 Hank Aaron * .9285
41 Earl Averill * .9283
Tris Speaker * .9283
43 Charlie Keller .9276
44 Frank Robinson * .9265
45 Ken Williams .9238
46 Chuck Klein * .9218
47 Mike Piazza * .9217
48 Duke Snider * .9194
49 Ed Delahanty * .9165
50 Paul Goldschmidt .9163
Rank Player OPS
51 Jason Giambi .9157
52 Babe Herman .9148
53 Al Simmons * .9147
54 Dick Allen .9117
55 Mike Schmidt * .9075
56 Ken Griffey Jr. * .9073
57 Gary Sheffield .9070
58 Mo Vaughn .9058
59 Giancarlo Stanton .9048
60 Juan González .9039
61 Jim Edmonds .9030
62 Brian Giles .9022
63 Bill Joyce .9020
64 Bob Johnson .8987
Bill Terry * .8987
66 Chick Hafey * .8980
67 Mickey Cochrane * .8970
68 Bryce Harper .8948
69 Hal Trosky .8925
70 Ryan Braun .8916
71 Sam Thompson * .8896
72 Willie McCovey * .8891
73 Matt Holliday .8889
74 Nolan Arenado .8888
75 Willie Stargell * .8887
76 Billy Hamilton * .8875
77 Prince Fielder .8873
78 Mookie Betts .8868
Jake Stenzel .8868
80 Goose Goslin * .8867
81 Fred McGriff .8860
82 Eddie Mathews * .8855
83 Rafael Palmeiro .8852
84 J. D. Martinez .8851
85 Moisés Alou .8550
86 Harmon Killebrew * .8842
87 Charlie Gehringer * .8841
88 Tim Salmon .8836
89 Roger Connor * .8828
90 Jackie Robinson * .8826
George Selkirk .8826
92 Nomar Garciaparra .8821
93 Freddie Freeman .8815
94 Wally Berger .8805
95 Will Clark .8801
Kevin Mitchell .8801
97 Dolph Camilli .8800
98 Riggs Stephenson .8797
99 Al Rosen .8792
100 Jeff Heath .8788

Notes

  1. ^ A player is considered inactive if he has announced his retirement or not played for a full season.

External links

  1. ^ See www.baseballprospectus.com or rec.sport.baseball.
Al Simmons

Aloysius Harry Simmons (May 22, 1902 – May 26, 1956), born Alois Szymanski, was an American professional baseball player. Nicknamed "Bucketfoot Al", he played for two decades in Major League Baseball (MLB) as an outfielder and had his best years with Connie Mack's Philadelphia Athletics during the late 1920s and early 1930s, winning two World Series with Philadelphia. Simmons also played for the Chicago White Sox, Detroit Tigers, Washington Senators, Boston Braves, Cincinnati Reds and Boston Red Sox. After his playing career ended, Simmons served as a coach for the Athletics and Cleveland Indians. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1953.

Base on balls

A base on balls (BB), also known as a walk, occurs in baseball when a batter receives four pitches that the umpire calls balls, and is in turn awarded first base without the possibility of being called out. The base on balls is defined in Section 2.00 of baseball's Official Rules, and further detail is given in 6.08(a). It is, however, considered a faux pas for a professional player to actually walk to first base; the batter-runner and any advancing runners normally jog on such a play.The term "base on balls" distinguishes a walk from the other manners in which a batter can be awarded first base without liability to be put out (e.g., hit by pitch (HBP), catcher's interference). Though a base on balls, catcher's interference, or a batter hit by a pitched ball all result in the batter (and possibly runners on base) being awarded a base, the term "walk" usually refers only to a base on balls, and not the other methods of reaching base without the bat touching the ball. An important difference is that for a hit batter or catcher's interference, the ball is dead and no one may advance unless forced; the ball is live after a walk (see below for details).

A batter who draws a base on balls is commonly said to have been "walked" by the pitcher. When the batter is walked, runners advance one base without liability to be put out only if forced to vacate their base to allow the batter to take first base. If a batter draws a walk with the bases loaded, all preceding runners are forced to advance, including the runner on third base who is forced to home plate to score a run; when a run is forced on a walk, the batter is credited with an RBI per rule 10.04.Receiving a base on balls does not count as a hit or an at bat for a batter but does count as a time on base and a plate appearance. Therefore, a base on balls does not affect a player's batting average, but it can increase his on-base percentage.A hit by pitch is not counted statistically as a walk, though the effect is mostly the same, with the batter receiving a free pass to first base. One exception is that on a HBP (hit-by-pitch), the ball is dead. On a HBP, any runners attempting to steal on the play must return to their original base unless forced to the next base anyway. When a walk occurs, the ball is still live: any runner not forced to advance may nevertheless attempt to advance at his own risk, which might occur on a steal play, passed ball, or wild pitch. Also, because a ball is live when a base on balls occurs, runners on base forced to advance one base may attempt to advance beyond one base, at their own risk. The batter-runner himself may attempt to advance beyond first base, at his own risk. Rule 6.08 addresses this matter as well. An attempt to advance an additional base beyond the base awarded might occur when ball four is a passed ball or a wild pitch.

Edgar Martínez

Edgar Martínez (born January 2, 1963), nicknamed "Gar" and "Papi", is a Puerto Rican professional baseball player and coach. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a designated hitter and third baseman for the Seattle Mariners from 1987 through 2004. He served as the Mariners' hitting coach from 2015 through 2018.

Martínez grew up in Dorado, Puerto Rico. Not highly regarded as a prospect, he signed with the Mariners as a free agent in 1982, and was given a small signing bonus. He made his major league debut in 1987, but did not establish himself as a full-time player until 1990. In the 1995 American League Division Series, he hit "The Double", which won the series and increased public support for Mariners baseball as they attempted to fund a new stadium. He continued to play until 2004, when injuries forced him to retire.

Martínez was a seven-time MLB All-Star, five-time Silver Slugger, and two-time batting champion. He is one of 18 MLB players to record a batting average of .300, an on-base percentage of .400, and a slugging percentage of .500 in 5,000 or more plate appearances. The Mariners retired his uniform number and inducted him into the Seattle Mariners Hall of Fame. Martínez was elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2019.

Giancarlo Stanton

Giancarlo Cruz Michael Stanton (born November 8, 1989), formerly known as Mike Stanton, is an American outfielder and designated hitter for the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball (MLB). He made his major league debut in 2010 as a member of the Miami Marlins, with whom he played until the end of the 2017 season. Stanton has twice led the National League (NL) in home runs; he hit 59 home runs in 2017, the most in 16 years. Known for his prodigious physical strength and ability to regularly hit long home runs, Stanton stands 6 feet 6 inches (1.98 m) tall and weighs 245 pounds (111 kg). He bats and throws right-handed.

Stanton is originally from the Greater Los Angeles region. He graduated from Notre Dame High School in Sherman Oaks, Los Angeles, before the Marlins selected him in the second round of the 2007 MLB draft. In 2017, Stanton led the major leagues in home runs (59), runs batted in (RBIs) (132), and slugging percentage (.631), winning the National League Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award. A four-time MLB All-Star, Stanton has twice won both the NL Hank Aaron and outfield Silver Slugger Award after leading the league in home runs.

In November 2014, the Marlins signed Stanton to the richest total dollar value contract in team sports history at the time of the signing; the contract is worth $325 million over 13 years. Following the 2017 season, Stanton was traded to the New York Yankees.

Hack Wilson

Lewis Robert "Hack" Wilson (April 26, 1900 – November 23, 1948) was an American Major League Baseball player who played 12 seasons for the New York Giants, Chicago Cubs, Brooklyn Dodgers and Philadelphia Phillies. Despite his diminutive stature, he was one of the most accomplished power hitters in the game during the late 1920s and early 1930s. His 1930 season with the Cubs is widely considered one of the most memorable individual single-season hitting performances in baseball history. Highlights included 56 home runs, the National League record for 68 years; and 191 runs batted in, a mark yet to be surpassed. "For a brief span of a few years", wrote a sportswriter of the day, "this hammered down little strongman actually rivaled the mighty Ruth."While Wilson's combativeness and excessive alcohol consumption made him one of the most colorful sports personalities of his era, his drinking and fighting undoubtedly contributed to a premature end to his athletic career and, ultimately, his premature death. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1979.

J. D. Martinez

Julio Daniel Martinez (born August 21, 1987) is an American professional baseball outfielder and designated hitter for the Boston Red Sox of Major League Baseball (MLB). He has also played in MLB for the Houston Astros, Detroit Tigers, and Arizona Diamondbacks. A right-handed thrower and batter, Martinez stands 6 feet 3 inches (1.91 m) tall and weighs 221 pounds (100 kg).

A native of Miami, Florida, Martinez was selected by the Astros in the 20th round with the 611th pick in the 2009 amateur draft from Nova Southeastern University (NSU). He is a two-time selection for the MLB All-Star Game and a three-time Silver Slugger Award winner, as well as the only player to earn the latter honor twice in the same season. On September 4, 2017, Martinez became the 18th player in MLB history to hit four home runs in a single game, doing so versus the Los Angeles Dodgers. He is of Cuban descent.

He placed second in the American League in the 2018 season in home runs and batting average, and first in RBIs, and was a crucial component of the Red Sox's 2018 World Series title run.

Jimmie Foxx

James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967), nicknamed "Double X" and "The Beast", was an American professional baseball first baseman who played 20 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Athletics, Boston Red Sox, Chicago Cubs, and Philadelphia Phillies. His most productive years were with the Philadelphia Athletics and the Boston Red Sox, where he hit 30 or more home runs in 12 consecutive seasons and drove in more than 100 runs in 13 consecutive years.

Foxx became the second player in MLB history to hit 500 career home runs, after Babe Ruth. Attaining that plateau at age 32 years 336 days, he held the record for youngest to reach 500 for sixty-eight years, until superseded by Alex Rodriguez in 2007. His three career Most Valuable Player awards are tied for second all-time. Foxx was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1951.

Josh Donaldson

Joshua Adam Donaldson (born December 8, 1985) is an American professional baseball third baseman for the Atlanta Braves of Major League Baseball (MLB). He was initially drafted by the Chicago Cubs in the 2007 MLB Draft after playing college baseball at Auburn University. Donaldson made his MLB debut with the Oakland Athletics in 2010 as a catcher, progressing with the team, switching positions to third base, and eventually becoming an All-Star in the 2014 MLB season.

After being traded to the Toronto Blue Jays, Donaldson was voted the American League Most Valuable Player for the 2015 MLB season, the first Blue Jays player to be named MVP since George Bell won the award in 1987, and was named as a starter to the 2015 MLB All-Star Game, earning the most fan votes obtained by a player in the process. Donaldson also won the Silver Slugger Award and led the American League in RBIs (runs batted in) and runs scored. He was traded to the Cleveland Indians in August 2018, and then signed as a free agent with the Braves in November 2018.

Ken Williams (baseball)

Kenneth Roy Williams (June 28, 1890 – January 22, 1959) was an American professional baseball player. He played as an outfielder in Major League Baseball from 1915 to 1929. Williams began his major league career with the Cincinnati Reds before spending the majority of his playing days with the St. Louis Browns, and ended his career playing for the Boston Red Sox. He batted left-handed and threw right-handed. Williams was the first member of Major League Baseball's 30–30 club, for players who have reached the 30 home runs and 30 stolen bases plateaus in the same season.

List of Major League Baseball career batting average leaders

In baseball, the batting average (BA) is defined by the number of hits divided by at bats. It is usually reported to three decimal places and pronounced as if it were multiplied by 1,000: a player with a batting average of .300 is "batting three-hundred." A point (or percentage point) is understood to be .001 . If necessary to break ties, batting averages could be taken to more than three decimal places.

Outfielder Ty Cobb, whose career ended in 1928, has the highest batting average in Major League Baseball (MLB) history. He batted .366 over 24 seasons, mostly with the Detroit Tigers. In addition, he won a record 11 batting titles for leading the American League in BA over the course of an entire season. He batted over .360 in 11 consecutive seasons from 1909 to 1919. Rogers Hornsby has the second highest BA of all-time, at .358. He won seven batting titles in the National League (NL) and has the highest NL average in a single season since 1900, when he batted .424 in 1924. He batted over .370 in six consecutive seasons.Shoeless Joe Jackson is the only other player to finish his career with a batting average over .350. He batted .356 over 13 seasons before he was permanently suspended from organized baseball in 1921 for his role in the Black Sox Scandal. Lefty O'Doul first came to the major leagues as a pitcher, but after developing a sore arm, he converted to an outfielder and won two batting titles. The fifth player on the list, and the last with at least a .345 BA, is Ed Delahanty. Delahanty's career was cut short when he fell into the Niagara Falls and died during the 1903 season.The last player to bat .400 in a season, Ted Williams, ranks tied for seventh on the all-time career BA list. Babe Ruth hit for a career .342 average and is tenth on the list. A player must have a minimum of 3,000 plate appearances in order to qualify for the list.

List of Major League Baseball career hits leaders

Below is the list of the 285 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 2,000 hit milestone during their career in MLB.

Pete Rose holds the Major League record for most career hits, with 4,256. Rose and Ty Cobb second most, are the only players with 4,000 or more career hits. George Davis was the first switch hitter to collect 2,000 hits, doing so during the 1902 season.

List of Major League Baseball career on-base percentage leaders

In baseball statistics, on-base percentage (OBP) is a measure of how often a batter reaches base for any reason other than a fielding error, fielder's choice, dropped or uncaught third strike, fielder's obstruction, or catcher's interference. OBP is calculated in Major League Baseball (MLB) by dividing the sum of hits, walks, and times hit by a pitch by the sum of at-bats, walks, times hit by pitch and sacrifice flies. A hitter with a .400 on-base percentage is considered to be great and rare; only 55 players in MLB history with at least 3,000 career plate appearances (PA) have maintained such an OBP. Left fielder Ted Williams, who played 19 seasons for the Boston Red Sox, has the highest career on-base percentage, .4817, in MLB history. Williams led the American League (AL) in on-base percentage in twelve seasons, the most such seasons for any player in the major leagues. Barry Bonds led the National League (NL) in ten seasons, a NL record. Williams also posted the then-highest single-season on-base percentage of .5528 in 1941, a record that stood for 61 years until Bonds broke it with a .5817 OBP in 2002. Bonds broke his own record in 2004, setting the current single-season mark of .6094.Mickey Cochrane is the only catcher and Arky Vaughan is the only shortstop with a career mark of at least .400. Of the 43 players eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame with a career on-base percentage of .400 or higher, 27 have been elected. Players are eligible for the Hall of Fame if they have played at least 10 major league seasons, have been either retired for five seasons or deceased for six months, and have not been banned from MLB. These requirements leave 6 living players ineligible who have played in the past 5 seasons; 5 players (Bill Joyce, Ferris Fain, Jake Stenzel, Bill Lange, and George Selkirk) who did not play 10 seasons in MLB; and Shoeless Joe Jackson, who was banned for his role in the Black Sox Scandal.

List of Major League Baseball career runs batted in leaders

The following is a list of Major League Baseball players who have reached the 1,000 runs batted in (RBIs) milestone. RBIs are usually accumulated by a batter in baseball by successfully allowing a runner on base to score as a result of making contact at-bat (except in certain situations, such as when an error is made on the play or during a double play), though a batter is credited with an RBI if a run scores as a result of his reaching first base with the bases loaded as a result of either a base on balls (walk), or being hit by a pitch, or interference. Albert Pujols is the only active top five RBI player in 2019.

List of Major League Baseball career runs scored leaders

Listed are all Major League Baseball (MLB) players with 1,000 or more career runs scored. Players in bold face are active as of the 2018 Major League Baseball season.

Mark McGwire

Mark David McGwire (born October 1, 1963), nicknamed Big Mac, is an American former professional baseball first baseman. His Major League Baseball (MLB) playing career spanned from 1986 to 2001 while playing for the Oakland Athletics and the St. Louis Cardinals, winning one World Series championship each with Oakland as a player in 1989 and with St. Louis as a coach in 2011. One of the most prolific home run hitters in baseball history, McGwire holds the major league career record for at bats per home run ratio (10.6), and is the former record holder for both home runs in a single season (70 in 1998) and home runs hit by rookie (49 in 1987).

He ranks 11th all time in home runs with 583, and led the major leagues in home runs in five different seasons, while establishing the major league record for home runs hit in a four-season period from 1996−1999 with 245. Further, he demonstrated exemplary patience as a batter, producing a career .394 on-base percentage (OBP) and twice leading the major leagues in bases on balls. Injuries cut short the manifestation of even greater potential as he reached 140 games played in just eight of 16 total seasons. A right-handed batter and thrower, McGwire stood 6 feet 5 inches (1.96 m) tall and weighed 245 pounds (111 kg) during his playing career.

From Pomona, California, the Athletics chose McGwire with the 10th overall selection in the 1984 MLB draft, and he was a member of the silver medal-winning entry of the United States national team that same year at the Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. As a rookie in 1987, he quickly grabbed media attention with 33 home runs before the All-Star break, and would lead the major leagues in home runs that year with 49, while setting the single-season rookie record. He appeared in six straight All-Star Games from 1987 to 1992 despite a brief career decline related to injuries. Another string of six consecutive All-Star appearances followed from 1995 to 2001. Each season from 1996 to 1999, he again led the major leagues in home runs.

A part of the 1998 Major League Baseball home run record chase of Roger Maris' 61 with the Cardinals, McGwire set the major league single-season home run record with 70, which Barry Bonds broke three years later with 73. McGwire also led the league in runs batted in, twice in bases on balls and on-base percentage, and four times in slugging percentage. Injuries significantly cut into his playing time in 2000 and 2001 before factoring into his retirement. He finished with 583 home runs, which was fifth all-time when he retired.For his career, McGwire averaged a home run once every 10.61 at bats, the best at bats per home run ratio in baseball history (Babe Ruth is second at 11.76). He was the fastest player to hit 500 home runs, in 5,487 at-bats.McGwire was a central figure in baseball's steroids scandal. In 2010, McGwire publicly admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs during a large portion of his career. In his first ten years of eligibility, McGwire has not been elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Paul Goldschmidt

Paul Edward Goldschmidt (born September 10, 1987), nicknamed "Goldy", is an American professional baseball first baseman for the St. Louis Cardinals of Major League Baseball (MLB). He made his MLB debut with the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2011. Prior to playing professionally, Goldschmidt played baseball for The Woodlands High School and Texas State Bobcats.

Goldschmidt was lightly recruited out of The Woodlands. After playing at Texas State, the Diamondbacks selected him in the eighth round of the 2009 MLB draft. He rose through the minor leagues, reaching the major leagues on August 1, 2011. The Diamondbacks traded him to the Cardinals during the 2018–19 offseason.

Goldschmidt is a six-time MLB All-Star. He led the National League in home runs and runs batted in during the 2013 season. He has won the National League (NL) Hank Aaron Award, Gold Glove Award, and Silver Slugger Award. Goldschmidt has twice finished runner-up for the NL Major League Baseball Most Valuable Player Award, in 2013 and 2015.

Shoeless Joe Jackson

Joseph Jefferson Jackson (July 16, 1887 – December 5, 1951), nicknamed "Shoeless Joe", was an American star outfielder who played Major League Baseball (MLB) in the early 1900s. He is remembered for his performance on the field and for his alleged association with the Black Sox Scandal, in which members of the 1919 Chicago White Sox participated in a conspiracy to fix the World Series. As a result of Jackson's association with the scandal, Kenesaw Mountain Landis, Major League Baseball's first commissioner, banned Jackson from playing after the 1920 season despite exceptional play in the 1919 World Series, leading both teams in several statistical categories and setting a World Series record with 12 base hits. Since then, Jackson's guilt has been fiercely debated with new accounts claiming his innocence, urging Major League Baseball to reconsider his banishment. As a result of the scandal, Jackson's career was abruptly halted in his prime, ensuring him a place in baseball lore.

Jackson played for three Major League teams during his 12-year career. He spent 1908–1909 as a member of the Philadelphia Athletics and 1910 with the minor league New Orleans Pelicans before joining the Cleveland Naps at the end of the 1910 season. He remained in Cleveland through the first part of 1915; he played the remainder of the 1915 season through 1920 with the Chicago White Sox. Later in life, Jackson played ball under assumed names throughout the south, including the 71st Service squadron in 1934 and winning the league title.

Jackson, who played left field for most of his career, currently has the third-highest career batting average in major league history. In 1911, Jackson hit for a .408 average. It is still the sixth-highest single-season total since 1901, which marked the beginning of the modern era for the sport. His average that year also set the record for batting average in a single season by a rookie. Babe Ruth said that he modeled his hitting technique after Jackson's.Jackson still holds the Indians and White Sox franchise records for both triples in a season and career batting average. In 1999, he ranked number 35 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players and was nominated as a finalist for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. The fans voted him as the 12th-best outfielder of all-time. He also ranks 33rd on the all-time list for non-pitchers according to the win shares formula developed by Bill James.

Todd Helton

Todd Lynn Helton (born August 20, 1973) is an American former professional baseball first baseman who played his entire 17-year career for the Colorado Rockies of Major League Baseball (MLB). A five-time All-Star, four-time Silver Slugger, and three-time Gold Glove Award winner, Helton holds the Colorado Rockies club records for hits (2,519), home runs (369), doubles (592), walks (1,335), runs scored (1,401), runs batted in (RBI, with 1,406), games played (2,247), and total bases (4,292), among others.Each season from 1999–2004, Helton met or exceeded all of the following totals: .320 batting average, 39 doubles, 30 home runs, 107 runs scored, 96 RBI, .577 slugging percentage and .981 on-base plus slugging. In 2000, he won the batting title with a .372 average, and also led MLB with a .698 slugging percentage, 59 doubles, 147 RBI and the National League with 216 hits. Helton amassed his 2,000th career hit against the Atlanta Braves on May 19, 2009, and his 2,500th against the Cincinnati Reds on September 1, 2013.

Will Clark

William Nuschler Clark, Jr. (born March 13, 1964) is a former first baseman in Major League Baseball best known for his years with the San Francisco Giants from 1986 to 1993. Clark was known by the nickname of "Will the Thrill." The nickname has often been truncated to simply, "The Thrill."After a sensational career at Jesuit High School in New Orleans, Clark attended Mississippi State University, where he continued to flourish. Clark was inducted into the Mississippi State University Hall of Fame in 2003. Clark was inducted into the College Baseball Hall of Fame in 2006. He was inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame on April 26, 2007 and the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame on August 1, 2008.He currently works in the San Francisco Giants front office after spending five seasons as an advisor for the Arizona Diamondbacks.

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