List of Major League Baseball awards

Major League Baseball presents a variety of annual awards and trophies to recognize both its teams and its players. Three team trophies are awarded annually: one each to the National League and American League champions, and one of the champion of the World Series. Additionally, various organizations—such as the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA), the Office of the Commissioner of Baseball, and select corporate sponsors—present awards for such accomplishments as excellence in batting, pitching performance, fielding prowess, and community service.[1][2]

The Most Valuable Player Award, commonly known as the "MVP", is the oldest individual award, given in its current format since 1931.[1] MVP awards are also presented for performances in the Major League Baseball All-Star Game, the League Championship Series, and the World Series.[1] Offensive awards include the Silver Slugger Award and the Hank Aaron Award, while the Cy Young Award and Rolaids Relief Man Award recognize pitching; the Rawlings Gold Glove Award is given for fielding. The DHL Delivery Man and Major League Baseball Comeback Player of the Year Awards are the newest awards, both established in 2005.[3][4] Additionally, the Commissioner, at his discretion, can present an Historic Achievement Award for any great contribution to the sport that he deems worthy.

Team awards

Commissioner's Trophy

The Commissioner's Trophy is presented each year by the Commissioner of Baseball to the Major League Baseball team that wins the World Series. The World Series is played between the champion clubs of the American League and the National League. The "modern" World Series has been played every year since 1903 with the exception of 1904, which was cancelled when the NL champion New York Giants declined to play the AL champion Boston Americans,[5] and 1994, which was cancelled due to the players' strike.[6]

Baseball has employed various championship formulas since the 1860s. When the term "World Series" is used by itself, it is usually understood to refer to the "modern" World Series exclusively.[7] The World Series championship is determined through a best-of-seven playoff. Best-of-seven has been the format of nearly all of the modern World Series, except 1903 and 1919–1921 which were best-of-nine. In addition to the Commissioner's Trophy, each player on the winning team receives an individual World Series ring. The Commissioner's Trophy has been awarded to the Series winner since 1967.[8]

Recent trophy designs contain flags representing each team in each league.[9] It is the only championship trophy of the four major sports in the United States that is not named after a particular person[10] (contrasting with the National Hockey League's Stanley Cup,[11] the National Football League's Vince Lombardi Trophy,[12] and the National Basketball Association's Larry O'Brien Trophy).[13] The current holders of the trophy are the Boston Red Sox of the American League, who won the 2018 World Series.

Warren C. Giles Trophy

The Warren C. Giles Trophy is presented annually to the champion of the National League.[14] The award is named for Warren Giles, who was league president from 1951 to 1969. Until 2017 the award was passed from champion to champion (like the NHL's Stanley Cup) as opposed a new trophy being created each season. Starting in 2017, an identical trophy as the American League trophy was made. Warren's son Bill Giles, the honorary league president and former part-owner of the Philadelphia Phillies, presents the trophy to the National League champion at the conclusion of each National League Championship Series.[14] The Los Angeles Dodgers are the current holders of the Giles Trophy after beating the Milwaukee Brewers in the 2018 National League Championship Series.

William Harridge Trophy

The William Harridge Trophy is the American League's counterpart to the Giles Trophy, and is presented each year to the American League champion. Prior to 2017, the trophy featured a golden eagle, the league's emblem, sitting atop a silver baseball and clutching the American League banner.[15] Since 2017, the trophy is all silver with a pennant on top. The trophy is named for Will Harridge, who was league president from 1931 to 1958.[16] The Boston Red Sox are the current holders of the Harridge Trophy in honor of their 2018 American League Championship Series win over the defending champion Houston Astros. A new trophy is awarded each year.

Individual awards

Most Valuable Player

The Most Valuable Player Award (commonly known as the MVP) is an annual award given to one outstanding player in each league of Major League Baseball. The MVP originated in 1910 as the Chalmers Award, sponsored by the Chalmers Automobile Company. Chalmers presented the award until 1914.[17] The National and American Leagues presented their own "League Awards" from 1922 to 1929,[18] after which the BBWAA began to present an unofficial award. Since 1931, it has been officially presented by the BBWAA. Each winner receives the Kenesaw Mountain Landis Memorial Baseball Award, which became the official name of the award in 1944,[19] in honor of the first MLB commissioner, who served from 1920 until his death on November 25, 1944.[19] The 2018 award winners are Mookie Betts of the Boston Red Sox in the American League and Christian Yelich of the Milwaukee Brewers in the National League.

Cy Young

Cy Young Award
The Cy Young Award

The Cy Young Award is an honor given annually in baseball to the best pitchers in Major League Baseball, one each for the American and National Leagues. The award was first introduced in 1956 by Commissioner Ford Frick in honor of Hall of Fame pitcher Cy Young, who died in 1955. The award was originally given to the single best pitcher in the major leagues, but after Frick's retirement in 1967, the award was given to one pitcher in each league.[20] Each league's award is voted on by members of the Baseball Writers' Association of America, with two representatives from each team.[21] The 2018 award winners are Blake Snell of the Tampa Bay Rays in the American League and Jacob deGrom of the New York Mets in the National League.

Rookie of the Year

The Rookie of the Year Award is given annually to one player from each league, as voted upon by the BBWAA. The award was established in 1940 by the Chicago chapter of the BBWAA who alone selected a rookie of the year.[22] Starting in 1947, all members of the national BBWAA organization voted. Jackie Robinson was awarded the first official Rookie of the Year award.[23] The award was originally known as the J. Louis Comiskey Memorial Award, after the Chicago White Sox owner of the 1930s. In 1987, it was renamed the Jackie Robinson Award, in honor of the 40th year since Robinson broke the baseball color line. Only two players, both in the American League, have been named Rookie of the Year and MVP in the same year: Fred Lynn in 1975 and Ichiro Suzuki in 2001. The only Rookie of the Year to win the Cy Young Award in the same year was Fernando Valenzuela in 1981. In 1947 and 1948, only one award was given to a single player. Since 1949, the honor has been given to one player in each league.[24] The 2018 award winners are Shohei Ohtani of the Los Angeles Angels in the American League and Ronald Acuña Jr. of the Atlanta Braves in the National League.

Manager of the Year

The Manager of the Year Award is an honor given annually since 1983 to the best managers in the American and National Leagues. The winner is voted on by 28 members of the BBWAA. Each places a vote for first, second, and third place among the managers of each league.[a] The manager with the highest score in each league wins the award.[25] In 1991, Bobby Cox became the first manager to win the award in both leagues, winning with the Atlanta Braves and having previously won with the Toronto Blue Jays in 1985.[26] Tony La Russa, Lou Piniella, and Jim Leyland have since won the award in both leagues.[27][28][29] Joe Girardi is the only manager to win the award with a fourth-place team (2006 Florida Marlins);[30] he is also the only manager to win the award after fielding a team with a losing record.[31][32] The 2018 award winners are Bob Melvin of the Oakland Athletics in the American League and Brian Snitker of the Atlanta Braves in the National League.

Gold Glove

Gold glove award eric chavez
The Gold Glove Award

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National and American Leagues, as voted by the managers and coaches in each league.[33] Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players.[33] Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985 and 2007), one at each of the nine positions in each league.

Silver Slugger

Rizzo with Silver Slugger
Washington Nationals general manager Mike Rizzo holds Ryan Zimmerman's Silver Slugger Award.

The Silver Slugger Award is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position in both the American League and the National League, as determined by Major League Baseball's coaches and managers. These voters consider several offensive categories in selecting the winners, including batting average, slugging percentage, and on-base percentage, in addition to "coaches' and managers' general impressions of a player's overall offensive value".[34] As with the Gold Glove, the prize is presented to outfielders irrespective of their specific position.[35][36] Additionally, only National League pitchers receive a Silver Slugger Award;[36] lineups in the American League include the designated hitter, who replaces the pitcher in the batting order,[37] so the designated hitter receives the award instead.[35]

Hank Aaron

The Hank Aaron Award is given annually to the Major League Baseball players selected as the top hitter in each league, as voted on by baseball fans and members of the media. It was introduced in 1999 to commemorate the 25th anniversary of Hank Aaron surpassing Babe Ruth's 714 career home runs. The award was the first major award to be introduced by Major League Baseball in more than 25 years.[38] Each team's radio and television play-by-play broadcasters and color analysts vote for three players in each league. Their first place vote receives five points, the second place vote receives three points, and the third place vote receives one point. Beginning in 2003, fans were given the opportunity to vote via Major League Baseball's website. Fans' votes account for 30% of the points, while broadcasters' and analysts' votes account for the other 70%.[39] The 2018 winners of the Hank Aaron Award are J. D. Martinez of the Boston Red Sox in the American League and Christian Yelich of the Milwaukee Brewers in the National League.

Rolaids Relief Man (discontinued in 2013)

The Rolaids Relief Man Award was an annual award given from the 1976 season to the 2012 season to the top relief pitchers of the regular season, one each in the American and National Leagues. Relief pitchers enter the game after the starting pitcher is removed. Because the first closers were nicknamed "firemen", a reference to "putting out the fire" of another team's rally,[40] the trophy is a gold-plated firefighter's helmet. The Relief Man of the Year is based on statistical performance, rather than votes. Each save is worth three points; a win, two points; a loss, negative two points; and a blown save, negative two points. A "tough save", which is worth an additional point, occurs when a relief pitcher enters the game and gets the save with the tying run already on base. The 2012 award winners are Jim Johnson of the Baltimore Orioles in the American League, and Craig Kimbrel of the Atlanta Braves in the National League.

Comeback Player of the Year

The Comeback Player of the Year Award is presented by MLB to the player who is judged to have "re-emerged on the baseball field during a given season."[4] The award was developed in 2005, as part of a sponsorship agreement between MLB and Viagra.[4] In 2005 and 2006 representatives from MLB and MLB.com selected six candidates each from the AL and NL and one winner for each league was selected via an online poll on MLB.com.[4][41] Since then, the winners have been selected by a panel of MLB beat reporters.[42][43] Under the current voting structure, first-place votes are worth five points, second-place votes worth three, and third-place votes worth one, with the award going to the player with the most overall points.[44] The 2018 award winners are David Price of the Boston Red Sox in the American League, and Jonny Venters of the Atlanta Braves in the National League.

World Series MVP

The Willie Mays World Series Most Valuable Player Award is given to the player who most contributes to his team's success in the final round of the Major League Baseball post-season. The award was originally given by the editors of Sport magazine, but is now decided by a combination of media members and Major League Baseball officials.[45] On September 29, 2017, it was renamed in honor of Willie Mays in remembrance of the 63rd anniversary of The Catch. Mays never won the award himself. The 2018 award winner is Boston Red Sox first baseman Steve Pearce.

League Championship Series MVP

The second round of the Major League Baseball post-season is known as the League Championship Series. This series has a best-of-seven playoff format, and currently follows the Division Series,[46] in which the three division champions and one wild card team from each league play against each other based on their regular-season records.[a] The winners of the National League Championship Series and the American League Championship Series advance to the World Series. The 2018 award winners are Cody Bellinger of the Los Angeles Dodgers in the National League and Jackie Bradley Jr. of the Boston Red Sox in the American League.

All-Star Game MVP

The Major League Baseball All-Star Game Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award is an annual Major League Baseball (MLB) award given to the most outstanding player in each year's MLB All-Star Game. Awarded each season since 1962, it was originally called the "Arch Ward Memorial Award" in honor of Arch Ward, the man who conceived the All-Star Game. The award's name was changed to the "Commissioner's Trophy" in 1970, but this name change was reversed in 1985 when the World Series Trophy was renamed the Commissioner's Trophy. Finally, the trophy was renamed the "Ted Williams Most Valuable Player Award" in 2002, in honor of former Boston Red Sox player Ted Williams, who had died earlier that year.[47] No award was presented for the 2002 All-Star Game, which ended in a tie.[48] In 2003, Garret Anderson of the Anaheim Angels was the first recipient of the newly named Ted Williams Award. Alex Bregman of the Houston Astros is the 2018 winner and current holder of the award.

Roberto Clemente

The Roberto Clemente Award is given annually to the player in Major League Baseball who "best exemplifies the game of baseball, sportsmanship, community involvement and the individual's contribution to his team", as voted on by baseball fans and members of the media. It is named for Hall of Fame outfielder Roberto Clemente. Originally known as the Commissioner's Award, it has been presented by Major League Baseball since 1971. In 1973, the award was renamed after Clemente following his death in a plane crash while delivering supplies to victims of the 1972 Nicaragua earthquake.[49] Each year, a panel of baseball dignitaries selects 1 player from 30 nominees, one from each club. Teams choose their nominee during the regular season, and the winner is announced at the World Series.[49] The player who receives the most votes online via MLB's official website, MLB.com, gets one vote in addition to the votes cast by the panel.[49] Yadier Molina of the St. Louis Cardinals in the National League is the 2018 winner and current holder of the award.

Reliever of the Year

The Major League Baseball Delivery Man Award is presented by Major League Baseball to the best relief pitcher in the league. The award was developed in 2005, as part of a sponsorship agreement between Major League Baseball and package delivery company DHL Express.[3] A monthly version of the award is also handed out to relievers during the season. The annual award ("DHL presents the Delivery Man of the Year") is voted upon by fans,[50] while the monthly edition ("DHL presents the Major League Baseball Delivery Man of the Month") is decided by a four-man panel of baseball experts and commentators.[51] The 2018 recipients of the annual award were Edwin Díaz of the Seattle Mariners in the American League and Josh Hader of the Milwaukee Brewers in the National League.

Commissioner's Historic Achievement Award
The Commissioner's Historic Achievement Award

Other awards

Commissioner's Historic Achievement

The Commissioner's Historic Achievement Award is presented by the Commissioner of Major League Baseball to a group or individual who has made a "major impact on the sport" of baseball.[52] The award consists of a trophy: a gold baseball sitting atop a silver trophy base.[53] The award has been presented thirteen times by Commissioner Bud Selig: eleven times to players, once to a team, and once to a non-player. The award is most often presented for breaking a Major League Baseball record; it has been presented three times to players who broke the single-season home run record (Sammy Sosa, Mark McGwire, and Barry Bonds). Other record-breakers to receive the award include Ichiro Suzuki (hits in a single season), Cal Ripken, Jr. (consecutive games played), Rickey Henderson (career stolen bases and career runs scored) and Mariano Rivera (career saves, both regular season and postseason; postseason ERA).[54] The most recent recipients are Vin Scully and Derek Jeter in 2014.[55][56]

See also

References

Inline citations
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  3. ^ a b "DHL named exclusive express delivery and logistics provider for Major League Baseball, MLB Advanced Media: Major League Baseball, DHL deliver new corporate sponsorship agreement; Introduce "DHL presents the Major League Baseball Delivery Man of the Month/Year Award"". Major League Baseball. March 31, 2005. Retrieved September 22, 2009.
  4. ^ a b c d "Major League Baseball, Pfizer announce the "Major League Baseball Comeback Player of the Year Award Presented by Viagra (sildenafil citrate)"" (Press release). Major League Baseball. August 24, 2005. Retrieved September 25, 2009.
  5. ^ "History of the World Series – 1904". The Sporting News. Archived from the original on December 3, 2009. Retrieved June 15, 2009.
  6. ^ "Season interrupted". Sports Illustrated. August 26, 2002. Retrieved June 15, 2009.
  7. ^ Torre, Joe; Verducci, Tom (2009). The Yankee Years. Doubleday. p. 153. ISBN 0-385-52740-3. Only once before in the 98-year history of the World Series had a team hit a game-saving home run from such a bleak position…. Verducci, in referring to the 2001 World Series, makes mention of its 98-year history—since 1903.
  8. ^ Rhodes, Greg; Castellini, Robert (2007). Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame Highlights. Clerisy Press. p. 81. ISBN 1-57860-300-5. Retrieved May 18, 2009.
  9. ^ "Phillies Announce World Series Trophy Tour Presented by Teva Pharmaceuticals and Comcast SportsNet". PR Newswire Association. January 9, 2009. Archived from the original on February 23, 2009. Retrieved May 18, 2009.
  10. ^ Terwilliger, Wayne; Peterson, Nancy; Boehm, Peter (2006). Terwilliger Bunts One. Globe Pequot. p. 233. ISBN 0-7627-4310-7.
  11. ^ Shea, Kevin. "Stanley Cup Journal". National Hockey League. Archived from the original on December 3, 2010. Retrieved May 18, 2009.
  12. ^ "Lombardi trophy on display". Central Florida News. January 25, 2009. Retrieved May 18, 2009.
  13. ^ "December 2004: Picture This". National Archives and Records Administration. Archived from the original on September 29, 2008. Retrieved October 17, 2008.
  14. ^ a b Jensen, Mike (October 16, 2008). "'Fantastic feeling' for Bill Giles". Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved August 20, 2009.
  15. ^ Edes, Gordon (October 24, 2004). "First impressions lasting for Henry". Boston Globe. Retrieved August 20, 2009.
  16. ^ Porter, David L., ed. (1987). Biographical Dictionary of American Sports: G-P. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 631. ISBN 0-313-31175-7.
  17. ^ Gillette, Gary; Gammons, Peter (2007). "The Boys of Summer: Awards and Other Honors". The ESPN Baseball Encyclopedia. Palmer, Pete (4 ed.). Sterling. p. 1764. ISBN 1-4027-4771-3.
  18. ^ "Review-The Week In Sports-Outlook". (September 28, 1925). The New York Times, Sports, p. 17.
  19. ^ a b "Landis, Kenesaw". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved 2011-11-22.
  20. ^ Hample, Zack (2007). "The Cy Young Award". Watching Baseball Smarter: A Professional Fan's Guide for Beginners, Semi-Experts, and Deeply Serious Geeks. Random House. pp. 40–41. ISBN 0-307-28032-2.
  21. ^ Dickson, p. 145.
  22. ^ Vass, George (July 1998). "History of the rookie award filled with controversy". Baseball Digest. 57 (7): 26. ISSN 0005-609X.
  23. ^ "A Test of Courage: Jackie Robinson's Rookie Year". npr.org. Retrieved July 14, 2008.
  24. ^ "Rookie of the Year winners". MLB.com. Retrieved July 14, 2008.
  25. ^ Castrovince, Anthony; Beck, Jason (November 14, 2007). "Wedge named AL's top manager". Major League Baseball. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  26. ^ "Bobby Cox Managerial Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  27. ^ "Lou Piniella Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  28. ^ "Tony La Russa Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  29. ^ "Jim Leyland Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  30. ^ "2006 Florida Marlins Batting, Pitching, & Fielding Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  31. ^ Frisaro, Joe (October 3, 2006). "Differences lead to Girardi's dismissal". Major League Baseball. Retrieved October 8, 2009.
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  33. ^ a b "A-Rod breaks Vizquel's streak; AL West earns eight of nine". Sports Illustrated. Associated Press. November 13, 2002. Retrieved May 26, 2009.
  34. ^ McCalvy, Adam (November 13, 2008). "Braun nets first Silver Slugger Award". Brewers.MLB.com. Retrieved March 9, 2009.
  35. ^ a b "Silver Slugger Award Winners — American League". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 9, 2009.
  36. ^ a b "Silver Slugger Award Winners — National League". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 9, 2009.
  37. ^ "Official Rules: 6.00 The Batter". Major League Baseball. Retrieved March 9, 2009.
  38. ^ "Prince Fielder, Alex Rodriguez win 2007 Sharp presents Hank Aaron Award". Major League Baseball. October 28, 2007. Retrieved May 24, 2009.
  39. ^ Sanchez, Jessie (October 24, 2002). "A-Rod receives Hank Aaron Award". Major League Baseball. Retrieved May 24, 2009.
  40. ^ Dickson, p. 195.
  41. ^ Newman, Mark (October 7, 2006). "Nomar, Thome nab Comeback honors". Major League Baseball. Retrieved September 25, 2009.
  42. ^ "Pena, Young win 2007 MLB Comeback Player of the Year Awards" (Press release). Major League Baseball. October 2, 2007. Retrieved October 22, 2009.
  43. ^ "Carpenter, Hill win 2009 MLB Comeback Player of the Year Awards" (Press release). Major League Baseball. October 5, 2009. Retrieved October 22, 2009.
  44. ^ Leach, Matthew (October 5, 2009). "Carpenter earns NL Comeback nod". Major League Baseball. Retrieved October 5, 2009.
  45. ^ "World Series Most Valuable Player Award". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved February 10, 2010.
  46. ^ Gillette, Gary and Palmer, Pete, eds. (2006). The 2006 ESPN Baseball Encyclopedia. Sterling. p. 1656. ISBN 1-4027-3625-8.CS1 maint: Uses editors parameter (link)
  47. ^ "All Star Game Most Valuable Player Award". Baseball-Almanac.com. Retrieved August 31, 2009.
  48. ^ Adam McCalvy (July 9, 2002). "All-Star Game finishes in tie". Major League Baseball. Retrieved August 31, 2009.
  49. ^ a b c "Robert Clemente Award – About the award". Major League Baseball. Retrieved January 29, 2010.
  50. ^ Mark Newman (September 25, 2007). "DHL Delivery Man voting has begun: Fans part of process to choose Majors' top reliever". Major League Baseball. Retrieved September 22, 2009.
  51. ^ "Inaugural season of the "DHL Presents the Major League Baseball Delivery Man of the Month Award" begins: Award recognizes the most outstanding relief pitcher for each month of the regular season". Major League Baseball. May 2, 2005. Retrieved September 22, 2009.
  52. ^ Bloom, Barry M. (April 15, 2007). "Commissioner honors Rachel Robinson". Major League Baseball. Archived from the original on March 19, 2010. Retrieved September 25, 2009.
  53. ^ Armour, Nancy (September 20, 1998). "Home Run!: The Year the Records Fell". Associated Press. Retrieved September 25, 2009.
  54. ^ "Commissioner's Historic Achievement Award". Major League Baseball. Retrieved September 24, 2009.
  55. ^ "Vin Scully honored with Commissioner's Historic Achievement Award". MLB.com. Major League Baseball. Archived from the original on 1 December 2017. Retrieved 20 November 2017.
  56. ^ "Bud Selig, MLB honor Derek Jeter".
Bibliography

External links

Atlanta Braves award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Atlanta Braves professional baseball franchise, including its years in Boston (1871–1952) and Milwaukee (1953–1965).

Babe Ruth Award

The Babe Ruth Award is given annually to the Major League Baseball (MLB) player with the best performance in the postseason. The award, created in honor of Babe Ruth, was first awarded in 1949 to the MVP of the World Series, one year after Ruth's death. The award was created by the New York City chapter of the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA). It continued to be awarded exclusively for performances in the World Series until 2007, when the New York chapter of the BBWAA changed the award to cover the entire postseason. Though it is older than the World Series Most Valuable Player Award, which was not created until 1955 (as the "SPORT Magazine Award"), the Babe Ruth Award is considered less prestigious, because it is not sanctioned by MLB and is awarded several weeks after the World Series.MLB expanded its postseason to include the League Championship Series (LCS) in 1969, the League Division Series (LDS) in 1995, and the Wild Card round in 2012. The Wild Card round is a one-game playoff, the LDS follows a best-of-five playoff format, and the LCS and World Series follow a best-of-seven playoff format. The most recent World Series champions are the Boston Red Sox, who won the 2018 World Series. David Price was named recipient of the Babe Ruth Award.Ruth was a noted slugger who batted .326 with 15 home runs and three wins in three games started as a pitcher during World Series play. However, the Babe Ruth Award does not only go to sluggers or pitchers. Dick Green won the award for the 1974 World Series, in which he batted 0-for-13, but helped the Oakland Athletics win the series with his defense.Joe Page of the New York Yankees was the first winner of the Babe Ruth Award, and Jonathan Papelbon of the Boston Red Sox was the first winner since the award criteria changed to cover the entire postseason. In all, members of the Yankees have won the award sixteen times. Luis Tiant is the only winner of the Babe Ruth Award to play for the World Series–losing team. Two players, Sandy Koufax and Jack Morris, have won the award twice.

DHL Hometown Heroes

DHL Hometown Heroes was a 2006 promotional event, sponsored by shipping company DHL, where Major League Baseball (MLB) fans were encouraged to vote for the most outstanding player in the history of each MLB franchise.

Fans were asked to vote for the most outstanding player in the history of each MLB franchise, based on on-field performance, leadership quality and character value. The candidates for the ballot were chosen by the clubs themselves, in conjunction with a blue-ribbon panel of baseball experts, journalists, and historians. The award winners were then chosen, over two months of voting, in a process similar to MLB all-star voting. Votes were cast by fans at every MLB ballpark, as well as online and via cell-phone. In all, nearly 17 million votes were cast.

On September 27, 2006 MLB announced a list of winning players, one from each team.

Of the players awarded, Nolan Ryan was the only player to win the award for two different teams: the Houston Astros and the Texas Rangers.

Three of the honored players were true "hometown heroes" in the sense of starring with MLB teams in or near their actual hometowns. Ryan grew up from infancy in the Houston suburb of Alvin, Texas. Cal Ripken Jr., chosen by Baltimore Orioles fans, was born in Havre de Grace and grew up in Aberdeen, towns in Harford County, Maryland within 45 minutes' drive of Baltimore. Pete Rose, chosen by Cincinnati Reds fans, was born and raised in Cincinnati. (Note that although Jackie Robinson, selected by Los Angeles Dodgers fans, grew up in Pasadena, California, he never played for the franchise in Los Angeles. His entire MLB career was with the Brooklyn Dodgers.)

Edgar Martínez Award

The Edgar Martínez Outstanding Designated Hitter Award, commonly referred to as the Edgar Martínez Award and originally known as the Outstanding Designated Hitter Award, has been presented annually to the most outstanding designated hitter (DH) in the American League (AL) in Major League Baseball (MLB) since 1973. The award is voted on by club beat reporters, broadcasters and AL public relations departments. All players with a minimum of 100 at bats at DH are eligible. It was given annually by members of the Associated Press who are beat writers, broadcasters, and public relations directors. The Associated Press discontinued the award in 2000, but it was picked up by the Baseball Writers' Association of America, which has administered it since.In September 2004, at Safeco Field ceremonies in honor of Edgar Martínez, Commissioner Bud Selig announced that the award would be renamed for the five-time recipient (1995, 1997–98, 2000–01). In an 18-year career with the Seattle Mariners, primarily as a designated hitter, Martínez batted .312, with 309 career home runs and 1,261 runs batted in.David Ortiz has won the award eight times, more than any other player (2003–2007, 2011, 2013, 2016). Other repeat winners of the award include Martinez himself (five times), three-time winner Hal McRae (1976, 1980, and 1982) and two-time winners Willie Horton (1975 and 1979), Greg Luzinski (1981 and 1983), Don Baylor (1985 and 1986), Harold Baines (1987 and 1988), Dave Parker (1989 and 1990), and Paul Molitor (1993 and 1996). Boston Red Sox players have won the most Edgar Martínez Awards with eleven.

Hank Aaron Award

The Hank Aaron Award is given annually to the Major League Baseball (MLB) players selected as the top hitter in each league, as voted on by baseball fans and members of the media. It was introduced in 1999 to commemorate the 25th anniversary of Hank Aaron's surpassing of Babe Ruth's career home run mark of 714 home runs. The award was the first major award to be introduced by Major League Baseball in 19 years.

For the 1999 season, a winner was selected using an objective points system. Hits, home runs, and runs batted in (RBI) were given certain point values and the winner was the player who had the highest tabulated points total.In 2000, the system was changed to a ballot in which each MLB team's radio and television play-by-play broadcasters and color analysts voted for three players in each league. Their first place vote receives five points, the second place vote receives three points, and the third place vote receives one point. Beginning in 2003, fans were given the opportunity to vote via MLB's official website, MLB.com. Fans' votes account for 30% of the points, while broadcasters' and analysts' votes account for the other 70%.The award is handed out to the winners of both leagues before Game 4 of the World Series each year, with Aaron himself presenting the awards.

The first winners of the award were Manny Ramirez and Sammy Sosa in 1999, while the most recent winners are J. D. Martinez and Christian Yelich. Alex Rodriguez won the award four times, the most of any player. The winner with the most hits was Todd Helton in 2000, Barry Bonds in 2001 had the most home runs, and Manny Ramírez in 1999 had the most RBIs. Players from the Boston Red Sox have won the award five times, the most of any team.

Interleague play

Interleague play in Major League Baseball refers to regular-season baseball games played between an American League (AL) team and a National League (NL) team. Interleague play was first introduced in the 1997 Major League Baseball season. Prior to that, matchups between AL teams and NL teams occurred only during spring training, the All-Star Game, other exhibition games (such as the Hall of Fame Game in Cooperstown, New York), and the World Series. Unlike modern interleague play, none of these contests, except for the World Series, counted toward official team or league records.

List of Milwaukee Brewers award winners and All-Stars

The Milwaukee Brewers professional baseball franchise dates to its 1969 founding in Washington as the Seattle Pilots. In 1970 the team relocated to Wisconsin, settling in Milwaukee.

In 1998, the team moved from the American League to the National League.This list, which is correct as of the end of the 2014 season, documents Pilots and Brewers players who have won league awards or were selected for mid-season Major League Baseball All-Star Game teams.

Lou Gehrig Memorial Award

The Lou Gehrig Memorial Award is given annually to a Major League Baseball (MLB) player who best exhibits the character and integrity of Lou Gehrig, both on the field and off it. The award was created by the Phi Delta Theta fraternity in honor of Gehrig, who was a member of the fraternity at Columbia University. It was first presented in 1955, fourteen years after Gehrig's death. The award's purpose is to recognize a player's exemplary contributions in "both his community and philanthropy." The bestowal of the award is overseen by the headquarters of the Phi Delta Theta in Oxford, Ohio, and the name of each winner is inscribed onto the Lou Gehrig Award plaque in the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York. It is the only MLB award conferred by a fraternity.Twenty-four winners of the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame. The inaugural winner was Alvin Dark. Curt Schilling (1995) and Shane Victorino (2008) received the award for working with the ALS Association and raising money for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The disease took Gehrig's life and is eponymously known as "Lou Gehrig's disease". Mike Timlin won the award in 2007 for his efforts in raising awareness and finding a cure for ALS, which took his mother's life in 2002.Winners of the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award have undertaken a variety of different causes. Many winners, including Rick Sutcliffe, Barry Larkin, Mark McGwire, Todd Stottlemyre and Derek Jeter, worked with children in need. Jeter assisted children and teenagers in avoiding drug and alcohol addiction through his Turn 2 Foundation, while Sutcliffe visited disabled children in hospitals and bestowed college scholarships to underprivileged juveniles through his foundation. Other winners devoted their work to aiding individuals who had a specific illness, such as Albert Pujols, whose daughter suffers from Down syndrome, and who devoted the Pujols Family Foundation to helping those with the disorder, and Ryan Zimmerman, who established the ziMS Foundation to raise money for multiple sclerosis, the disease which afflicts his mother.

Major League Baseball

Major League Baseball (MLB) is a professional baseball organization, and the oldest of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. A total of 30 teams play in the National League (NL) and American League (AL), with 15 teams in each league. The NL and AL were formed as separate legal entities in 1876 and 1901 respectively. After cooperating but remaining legally separate entities beginning in 1903, the leagues merged into a single organization led by the Commissioner of Baseball in 2000. The organization also oversees Minor League Baseball, which comprises 256 teams affiliated with the Major League clubs. With the World Baseball Softball Confederation, MLB manages the international World Baseball Classic tournament.

Baseball's first openly all-professional team was founded in Cincinnati in 1869. (There had been teams in the past that paid some players, and some that had paid all players but under the table.) The first few decades of professional baseball were characterized by rivalries between leagues and by players who often jumped from one team or league to another.

The period before 1920 in baseball was known as the dead-ball era; players rarely hit home runs during this time. Baseball survived a conspiracy to fix the 1919 World Series, which came to be known as the Black Sox Scandal. The sport rose in popularity in the 1920s, and survived potential downturns during the Great Depression and World War II. Shortly after the war, Jackie Robinson broke baseball's color barrier.

The 1950s and 1960s were a time of expansion for the AL and NL, then new stadiums and artificial turf surfaces began to change the game in the 1970s and 1980s. Home runs dominated the game during the 1990s, and media reports began to discuss the use of anabolic steroids among Major League players in the mid-2000s. In 2006, an investigation produced the Mitchell Report, which implicated many players in the use of performance-enhancing substances, including at least one player from each team.

Today, MLB is composed of 30 teams: 29 in the United States and 1 in Canada. Teams play 162 games each season and five teams in each league advance to a four-round postseason tournament that culminates in the World Series, a best-of-seven championship series between the two league champions that dates to 1903. Baseball broadcasts are aired on television, radio, and the Internet throughout North America and in several other countries throughout the world. MLB has the highest season attendance of any sports league in the world with more than 73 million spectators in 2015.

Major League Baseball Most Valuable Player Award

The Major League Baseball Most Valuable Player Award (MVP) is an annual Major League Baseball (MLB) award given to one outstanding player in the American League and one in the National League. Since 1931, it has been awarded by the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA). The winners receive the Kenesaw Mountain Landis Memorial Baseball Award, which became the official name of the award in 1944, in honor of the first MLB commissioner, Kenesaw Mountain Landis, who served from 1920 until his death on November 25, 1944.MVP voting takes place before the postseason, but the results are not announced until after the World Series. The BBWAA began by polling three writers in each league city in 1938, reducing that number to two per league city in 1961. The BBWAA does not offer a clear-cut definition of what "most valuable" means, instead leaving the judgment to the individual voters.First basemen, with 34 winners, have won the most MVPs among infielders, followed by second basemen (16), third basemen (15), and shortstops (15). Of the 25 pitchers who have won the award, 15 are right-handed while 10 are left-handed. Walter Johnson, Carl Hubbell, and Hal Newhouser are the only pitchers who have won multiple times, Newhouser winning consecutively in 1944 and 1945.Hank Greenberg, Stan Musial, Alex Rodriguez, and Robin Yount have won at different positions, while Rodriguez is the only player who has won the award with two different teams at two different positions. Barry Bonds has won the most often (seven times) and the most consecutively (four: 2001–04). Jimmie Foxx was the first player to win multiple times; 9 players have won three times, and 19 have won twice. Frank Robinson is the only player to win the award in both the American and National Leagues.

The award's only tie occurred in the National League in 1979, when Keith Hernandez and Willie Stargell received an equal number of points. There have been 18 unanimous winners, who received all the first-place votes. The New York Yankees have the most winning players with 22, followed by the St. Louis Cardinals with 17 winners. The award has never been presented to a member of the following three teams: Arizona Diamondbacks, New York Mets, and Tampa Bay Rays.

In recent decades, pitchers have rarely won the award. When Justin Verlander won the AL award in 2011, he became the first pitcher in either league to be named the MVP since Dennis Eckersley in 1992. Verlander also became the first starting pitcher to win this award since Roger Clemens accomplished the feat in 1986. The National League went even longer without an MVP award to a pitcher. After Bob Gibson won in 1968, no pitcher in that league was named MVP until Clayton Kershaw in 2014.

Marvin Miller Man of the Year Award

The Marvin Miller Man of the Year Award is given annually to a Major League Baseball (MLB) player "whose on-field performance and contributions to his community inspire others to higher levels of achievement." The award was created by the Major League Baseball Players' Association (MLBPA) and was presented to the inaugural winner—Mark McGwire—in 1997 as the "Man of the Year Award". Three years later, it was renamed in honor of Marvin Miller, the first executive director of the MLBPA. The award forms part of the Players Choice Awards.In order to determine the winner, each MLB team nominates one of their players, who is selected by their teammates to appear on the ballot. An online vote is conducted among baseball fans in order to reduce the number of candidates to six. MLB players then choose the award winner from among the six finalists. In addition to the award, recipients have $50,000 donated on their behalf to charities of their choice by the MLB Players Trust. John Smoltz, Jim Thome, Michael Young, and Curtis Granderson are the only players to win the Marvin Miller Man of the Year Award on multiple occasions. Four winners – Paul Molitor, Jim Thome, Smoltz, and Mariano Rivera – are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.Winners of the Marvin Miller Man of the Year Award have undertaken a variety of different causes. Many winners, including McGwire, Thome, Smoltz, Mike Sweeney, Torii Hunter, Young, Curtis Granderson and Brandon Inge, worked with children in need. McGwire established a foundation to assist children who were physically or sexually abused, while Inge visited disabled children at the Mott Children's Hospital and donated part of his salary to raise money for a pediatric cancer infusion center. Other winners devoted their work to aiding individuals who had a specific illness, such as Albert Pujols, whose daughter suffers from Down syndrome, and who devoted the Pujols Family Foundation to helping those with the disease, and Chipper Jones, who has been raising money for cystic fibrosis since 1996, after meeting an 11-year-old fan who suffered from the disease and who died several weeks after meeting Jones through the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

Miami Marlins award winners and league leaders

The Miami Marlins are a professional baseball team that has played in the National League since the team's founding in 1993. Major League Baseball offers several awards at the end of each season to commemorate the achievement of individual players. The Most Valuable Player award is generally given to the player who had the greatest impact on the success of his team, whether that be in the regular season, the postseason, or the All-Star game. The Cy Young Award is a prize awarded to the pitcher who is perceived to have had the best regular season. The Gold Glove Awards are presented to players who are recognized as being the best at fielding their respective positions during the regular season, while their counterparts the Silver Slugger is awarded to the best hitter at each respective position. The Rookie of the year is presented to the player recognized as the best newcomer to the league, while the Manager of the Year is given to the coach perceived to have had the greatest impact on his team's success.

San Diego Padres award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the San Diego Padres professional baseball team.

Silver Slugger Award

The Silver Slugger Award is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position in both the American League and the National League, as determined by the coaches and managers of Major League Baseball. These voters consider several offensive categories in selecting the winners, including batting average, slugging percentage, and on-base percentage, in addition to "coaches' and managers' general impressions of a player's overall offensive value". Managers and coaches are not permitted to vote for players on their own team. The Silver Slugger was first awarded in 1980 and is given by Hillerich & Bradsby, the manufacturer of Louisville Slugger bats. The award is a bat-shaped trophy, 3 feet (91 cm) tall, engraved with the names of each of the winners from the league and plated with sterling silver.The prize is presented to outfielders irrespective of their specific position. This means that it is possible for three left fielders, or any other combination of outfielders, to win the award in the same year, rather than one left fielder, one center fielder, and one right fielder. In addition, only National League pitchers receive a Silver Slugger Award; lineups in the American League include a designated hitter in place of the pitcher in the batting order, so the designated hitter receives the award instead.Home run record-holder Barry Bonds won twelve Silver Slugger Awards in his career as an outfielder, the most of any player. He also won the award in five consecutive seasons twice in his career: from 1990 to 1994, and again from 2000 to 2004. Retired former New York Mets catcher Mike Piazza and former New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez are tied for second, with ten wins each. Rodriguez' awards are split between two positions; he won seven Silver Sluggers as a shortstop for the Seattle Mariners and Texas Rangers, and three with the Yankees as a third baseman. Wade Boggs leads third basemen with eight Silver Slugger Awards; Barry Larkin leads shortstops with nine. Other leaders include Ryne Sandberg (seven wins as a second baseman) and Mike Hampton (five wins as a pitcher). Todd Helton and Albert Pujols are tied for the most wins among first baseman with four, although Pujols has won two awards at other positions. David Ortiz has won seven awards at designated hitter position, the most at that position.

Sporting News Reliever of the Year Award

The Sporting News Reliever of the Year Award was an annual award presented to the best relief pitcher in each league in Major League Baseball (MLB). It was established in 1960 by The Sporting News (TSN) as the Fireman of the Year Award. At the time, no reliever had ever received a Cy Young Award vote. The Fireman of the Year Award originally recognized the reliever with the most combined saves and wins in each league in MLB. The magazine had started publishing the then-unofficial save statistic that same year. Later, a save was worth two points compared to one for a save in determining the winner. In 2001 the award was chosen based on consensus from TSN editors, and it was renamed to Reliever of the Year Award. The award was last issued in 2010 before being discontinued.

Tampa Bay Rays award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Tampa Bay Rays professional baseball team.

Toronto Blue Jays award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Toronto Blue Jays professional baseball team.

Triple Crown (baseball)

In baseball, a player earns the Triple Crown when he leads a league in three specific statistical categories in the same season. The term "Triple Crown" generally refers to the batting achievement of leading a league in batting average, home runs, and runs batted in (RBI) over the same season. The term "Pitching Triple Crown" refers to the pitching achievement of leading a league in wins, strikeouts, and earned run average (ERA).

The term "Triple Crown" is typically used when a player leads one league, such as the American League (AL) or the National League (NL), in the specified categories. A tie for a lead in any category, such as home runs, is sufficient to be considered the leader in that category. A "Major League Triple Crown" may be said to occur when a player leads all of Major League Baseball in all three categories.

World Series Most Valuable Player Award

The Willie Mays World Series Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award is given to the player deemed to have the most impact on his team's performance in the World Series, which is the final round of the Major League Baseball (MLB) postseason. The award was first presented in 1955 as the SPORT Magazine Award, but is now decided during the final game of the Series by a committee of reporters and officials present at the game. On September 29, 2017, it was renamed in honor of Willie Mays in remembrance of the 63rd anniversary of The Catch. Mays never won the award himself.

Pitchers have been named Series MVP twenty-seven times; four of them were relief pitchers. Twelve of the first fourteen World Series MVPs were won by pitchers; from 1969 until 1986, the proportion of pitcher MVPs declined—Rollie Fingers (1974) and Bret Saberhagen (1985) were the only two pitchers to win the award in this period. From 1987 until 1991, all of the World Series MVPs were pitchers, and, since 1995, pitchers have won the award nine times. Bobby Richardson of the 1960 New York Yankees is the only player in World Series history to be named MVP despite being on the losing team.

The most recent winner was Steve Pearce of the Boston Red Sox, who won the award in 2018.

Major League Baseball awards and trophies
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