List of Major League Baseball annual doubles leaders

Major League Baseball recognizes doubles champions in the American League and National League each season.

American League

Year Player Team(s) Doubles
1901 Philadelphia Athletics 48
1902 Philadelphia Athletics
Washington Senators
43
1903 Philadelphia Athletics 45
1904 Cleveland Naps 47
1905 Philadelphia Athletics 47
1906 Cleveland Naps 48
1907 Philadelphia Athletics 35
1908 Detroit Tigers 36
1909 Detroit Tigers 35
1910 Cleveland Naps 51
1911 Detroit Tigers 47
1912 Boston Red Sox 53
1913 Cleveland Naps 39
1914 Boston Red Sox 46
1915 Detroit Tigers 40
1916 Cleveland Indians 41
1917 Detroit Tigers 44
1918 Cleveland Indians 33
1919 Detroit Tigers 45
1920 Cleveland Indians 50
1921 Cleveland Indians 52
1922 Cleveland Indians 48
1923 Cleveland Indians 59
1924 Detroit Tigers
Cleveland Indians
45
1925 St. Louis Browns 33
1926 Cleveland Indians 64
1927 New York Yankees 52
1928 New York Yankees
St. Louis Browns
47
1929 Detroit Tigers
Detroit Tigers
St. Louis Browns
45
1930 Cleveland Indians 49
1931 Boston Red Sox 67
1932 Philadelphia Athletics 47
1933 Washington Senators 45
1934 Detroit Tigers 63
1935 Cleveland Indians 47
1936 Detroit Tigers 60
1937 St. Louis Browns 51
1938 Boston Red Sox 51
1939 New York Yankees 46
1940 Detroit Tigers 50
1941 Cleveland Indians 45
1942 Chicago White Sox 40
1943 Detroit Tigers 38
1944 Cleveland Indians 45
1945 Chicago White Sox 35
1946 Washington Senators 44
1947 Cleveland Indians 45
1948 Boston Red Sox 44
1949 Boston Red Sox 39
1950 Detroit Tigers 56
1951 Detroit Tigers
Washington Senators
Washington Senators
36
1952 Philadelphia Athletics 43
1953 Washington Senators 43
1954 Washington Senators 33
1955 Detroit Tigers 38
1956 Boston Red Sox 40
1957 Baltimore Orioles
Chicago White Sox
36
1958 Detroit Tigers 39
1959 Detroit Tigers 42
1960 Cleveland Indians 36
1961 Detroit Tigers 41
1962 Chicago White Sox 45
1963 Boston Red Sox 40
1964 Minnesota Twins 43
1965 Minnesota Twins
Boston Red Sox
45
1966 Boston Red Sox 39
1967 Minnesota Twins 34
1968 Boston Red Sox 37
1969 Minnesota Twins 39
1970 Minnesota Twins
Kansas City Royals
Minnesota Twins
36
1971 Boston Red Sox 33
1972 Kansas City Royals 33
1973 Oakland Athletics
Milwaukee Brewers
32
1974 Oakland Athletics 39
1975 Boston Red Sox 47
1976 Kansas City Royals 40
1977 Kansas City Royals 54
1978 Kansas City Royals 45
1979 Milwaukee Brewers
Chicago White Sox
44
1980 Milwaukee Brewers 49
1981 Milwaukee Brewers 35
1982 Kansas City Royals
Milwaukee Brewers
46
1983 Baltimore Orioles 47
1984 New York Yankees 44
1985 New York Yankees 48
1986 New York Yankees 53
1987 Milwaukee Brewers 41
1988 Boston Red Sox 45
1989 Boston Red Sox 51
1990 Kansas City Royals
Boston Red Sox
45
1991 Texas Rangers 49
1992 Seattle Mariners
Chicago White Sox
46
1993 Toronto Blue Jays 54
1994 Minnesota Twins 45
1995 Cleveland Indians
Seattle Mariners
52
1996 Seattle Mariners 54
1997 Boston Red Sox 47
1998 Texas Rangers 50
1999 Toronto Blue Jays 45
2000 Toronto Blue Jays 57
2001 Oakland Athletics 47
2002 Anaheim Angels
Boston Red Sox
56
2003 Anaheim Angels
Toronto Blue Jays
49
2004 Baltimore Orioles 50
2005 Baltimore Orioles 50
2006 Cleveland Indians 53
2007 Detroit Tigers 54
2008 Boston Red Sox 54
2009 Baltimore Orioles 56
2010 Boston Red Sox 49
2011 Detroit Tigers 48
2012 Kansas City Royals 51
2013 Baltimore Orioles 51
2014 Detroit Tigers 52
2015 Cleveland Indians 45
2016 Boston Red Sox 48
2017 Cleveland Indians 56
2018 Houston Astros 51

National League

Year Player Team(s) Doubles
1876 Chicago White Stockings
Hartford Dark Blues
Chicago White Stockings
21
1877 Chicago White Stockings 19
1878 Providence Grays 22
1879 Cleveland Blues 31
1880 Cleveland Blues 27
1881 Providence Grays
Chicago White Stockings
27
1882 Chicago White Stockings 37
1883 Chicago White Stockings 49
1884 Providence Grays 36
1885 Chicago White Stockings 35
1886 Detroit Wolverines 40
1887 Detroit Wolverines 36
1888 Detroit Wolverines
Chicago White Stockings
33
1889 Boston Beaneaters 41
1890 Philadelphia Phillies 41
1891 Brooklyn Grooms 36
1892 Philadelphia Phillies 37
1893 Philadelphia Phillies 37
1894 Boston Beaneaters 51
1895 Philadelphia Phillies 49
1896 Philadelphia Phillies 44
1897 Baltimore Orioles 43
1898 Philadelphia Phillies 43
1899 Philadelphia Phillies 55
1900 Pittsburgh Pirates 45
1901 Brooklyn Superbas
Philadelphia Phillies
38
1902 Pittsburgh Pirates 30
1903 Pittsburgh Pirates
New York Giants
Cincinnati Reds
32
1904 Pittsburgh Pirates 44
1905 Cincinnati Reds 40
1906 Pittsburgh Pirates 38
1907 Pittsburgh Pirates 38
1908 Pittsburgh Pirates 39
1909 Pittsburgh Pirates 39
1910 Pittsburgh Pirates 43
1911 St. Louis Cardinals 38
1912 Chicago Cubs 41
1913 Brooklyn Superbas 40
1914 Philadelphia Phillies 39
1915 New York Giants 40
1916 Philadelphia Phillies 42
1917 Cincinnati Reds 39
1918 Cincinnati Reds 28
1919 New York Giants 31
1920 St. Louis Cardinals 44
1921 St. Louis Cardinals 44
1922 St. Louis Cardinals 46
1923 Cincinnati Reds 41
1924 St. Louis Cardinals 43
1925 St. Louis Cardinals 44
1926 St. Louis Cardinals 40
1927 Chicago Cubs 46
1928 Pittsburgh Pirates 50
1929 Brooklyn Robins 52
1930 Philadelphia Phillies 59
1931 St. Louis Cardinals 46
1932 Pittsburgh Pirates 62
1933 Philadelphia Phillies 44
1934 Philadelphia Phillies
Chicago Cubs
42
1935 Chicago Cubs 57
1936 St. Louis Cardinals 64
1937 St. Louis Cardinals 56
1938 St. Louis Cardinals 47
1939 St. Louis Cardinals 52
1940 Cincinnati Reds 44
1941 St. Louis Cardinals
Brooklyn Dodgers
39
1942 St. Louis Cardinals 38
1943 St. Louis Cardinals 48
1944 St. Louis Cardinals 51
1945 Boston Braves 47
1946 St. Louis Cardinals 50
1947 Cincinnati Reds 38
1948 St. Louis Cardinals 46
1949 St. Louis Cardinals 41
1950 St. Louis Cardinals 43
1951 New York Giants 41
1952 St. Louis Cardinals 42
1953 St. Louis Cardinals 53
1954 St. Louis Cardinals 41
1955 Milwaukee Braves 37
1956 Milwaukee Braves 34
1957 Cincinnati Reds 39
1958 San Francisco Giants 38
1959 Cincinnati Reds 47
1960 Cincinnati Reds 37
1961 Milwaukee Braves 39
1962 Cincinnati Reds 51
1963 St. Louis Cardinals 43
1964 Milwaukee Braves 44
1965 Milwaukee Braves 40
1966 Philadelphia Phillies 40
1967 Houston Astros 44
1968 St. Louis Cardinals 46
1969 Pittsburgh Pirates 41
1970 Los Angeles Dodgers 47
1971 Houston Astros 40
1972 Houston Astros
Philadelphia Phillies
39
1973 Pittsburgh Pirates 43
1974 Cincinnati Reds 45
1975 Cincinnati Reds 47
1976 Cincinnati Reds 42
1977 Pittsburgh Pirates 44
1978 Cincinnati Reds 51
1979 St. Louis Cardinals 48
1980 Philadelphia Phillies 42
1981 Chicago Cubs 35
1982 Montreal Expos 43
1983 Chicago Cubs
Montreal Expos
Pittsburgh Pirates
38
1984 Montreal Expos
Pittsburgh Pirates
38
1985 Cincinnati Reds 42
1986 Philadelphia Phillies 46
1987 Montreal Expos 42
1988 Montreal Expos 42
1989 St. Louis Cardinals
Montreal Expos
42
1990 New York Mets 40
1991 Pittsburgh Pirates 44
1992 Pittsburgh Pirates 45
1993 Colorado Rockies 45
1994 Houston Astros
Montreal Expos
43
1995 Chicago Cubs 51
1996 Houston Astros 48
1997 Montreal Expos 54
1998 Houston Astros 51
1999 Houston Astros 56
2000 Colorado Rockies 59
2001 Houston Astros 55
2002 Philadelphia Phillies 50
2003 St. Louis Cardinals 51
2004 Milwaukee Brewers 53
2005 Chicago Cubs 50
2006 Pittsburgh Pirates 53
2007 Colorado Rockies 50
2008 Houston Astros
Pittsburgh Pirates
46
2009 Houston Astros 46
2010 Philadelphia Phillies 46
2011 Cincinnati Reds 40
2012 Milwaukee Brewers 50
2013 St. Louis Cardinals 55
2014 Milwaukee Brewers 53
2015 St. Louis Cardinals 44
2016 Washington Nationals 47
2017 Colorado Rockies
Washington Nationals
43
2018 Atlanta Braves
Washington Nationals
44

American Association

Year Player Team(s) Doubles
1882 Pittsburgh Alleghenys 18
1883 Philadelphia Athletics 31
1884 Toledo Blue Stockings 39
1885 Philadelphia Athletics 37
1886 Philadelphia Athletics 36
1887 St. Louis Browns 52
1888 Louisville Colonels
Brooklyn Bridegrooms
31
1889 Philadelphia Athletics 39
1890 Syracuse Stars 33
1891 Philadelphia Athletics 35

Federal League

Year Player Team(s) Doubles
1914 Indianapolis Hoosiers 44
1915 Brooklyn Tip-Tops
Baltimore Terrapins
34

Player's League

Year Player Team(s) Doubles
1890 Cleveland Infants 40

Union Association

Year Player Team(s) Doubles
1884 St. Louis Maroons 40

National Association

Year Player Team(s) Doubles
1871 Rockford Forest Citys 11
1872 Boston Red Stockings 28
1873 Boston Red Stockings 29
1874 Hartford Dark Blues 22
1875 Boston Red Stockings 36

Notes and references

Amos Otis

Amos Joseph Otis (born April 26, 1947) is a former center fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the New York Mets (1967, 1969), Kansas City Royals (1970–1983) and Pittsburgh Pirates (1984). He batted and threw right-handed.

Bobby Byrne (baseball)

Robert Matthew Byrne (December 31, 1884 – December 31, 1964) was a third baseman in Major League Baseball. From 1907 through 1917, he played for the St. Louis Cardinals (1907–1909), Pittsburgh Pirates (1909–1913), Philadelphia Phillies (1913–1917) and Chicago White Sox (1917). Byrne batted and threw right-handed. He was born in St. Louis, Missouri.

Charlie Eden

Charles M. Eden (January 18, 1855 – September 17, 1920) was an outfielder in Major League Baseball. He played over parts of four seasons (1877, 1879, 1884–1885) for the Chicago White Stockings, Cleveland Blues, and Pittsburgh Alleghenys.

Curt Welch

Curtis Benton Welch (February 11, 1862 – August 29, 1896) was a Major League Baseball center fielder for the Toledo Blue Stockings, St. Louis Browns, Philadelphia Athletics, Baltimore Orioles, Cincinnati Reds, and Louisville Colonels.

Heinie Zimmerman

Henry Zimmerman (February 9, 1887 – March 14, 1969), known as "Heinie" or "The Great Zim", was a professional baseball infielder. Zimmerman played in Major League Baseball for the Chicago Cubs and New York Giants from 1907 to 1919. During his playing career, Zimmerman was primarily a third baseman, although he also played extensively at second base. He was born and died in The Bronx, New York City, and was of German ancestry. He is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in The Bronx, New York City.

Hub Collins

Hubert "Hub" Collins (April 15, 1864 – May 21, 1892) was a professional baseball player. He was a left fielder and second baseman over parts of seven seasons (1886–1892) with the Louisville Colonels and Brooklyn Bridegrooms/Grooms. He was the National League leader in runs scored in 1890 with Brooklyn. For his career, he compiled a .284 batting average, 319 runs batted in, 653 runs scored, and 335 stolen bases.

He was born in Louisville, Kentucky and later died in Brooklyn, New York at the age of 28 of typhoid fever.

Jack Graney

John Gladstone Graney (June 10, 1886 – April 20, 1978) was a Canadian left fielder in Major League Baseball who played his entire career with the Cleveland Indians.

Following his playing days, Graney became a baseball radio broadcaster, providing play-by-play, for the Indians in 1932–53.

Graney was inducted into the Cleveland Indians Distinguished Hall of Fame for non-uniformed personnel on August 11, 2012, prior to a game at Progressive Field.

Jake Stenzel

Jacob Charles Stenzel (June 24, 1867 – January 6, 1919) was an American professional baseball player. He played as a center fielder in Major League Baseball from 1890 to 1899 for the Chicago Colts, Pittsburgh Pirates, Baltimore Orioles, St. Louis Browns / Perfectos, and Cincinnati Reds. Stenzel was 5 feet 10 inches (1.78 m) tall and weighed 168 pounds (76 kg).

Jody Reed

Jody Eric Reed (born July 26, 1962) is an American former professional baseball second baseman. He played eleven seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) between 1987 and 1997 for the Boston Red Sox, Los Angeles Dodgers, Milwaukee Brewers, San Diego Padres, and Detroit Tigers.

Johnny Logan (baseball)

John Logan, Jr. (March 23, 1926 – August 9, 2013) was a shortstop in Major League Baseball. Logan was signed by the Boston Braves in 1947, having been discovered by Braves scout Dewey Briggs. He was a four-time All-Star and led the National League in doubles in 1955. Logan was the first major league batter Sandy Koufax faced; Logan hit a bloop single.

In a 13-season career, Logan was a lifetime .268 batter with 93 home runs and 547 RBIs in 1503 games. He has a total of 651 career runs scored and 19 stolen bases. He accumulated 216 doubles and 41 triples with a total of 1407 hits in 5244 career at bats. After his major league career, Logan played one season in Japan for the Nankai Hawks in 1964.

Logan grew up in Endicott, New York and attended Union-Endicott High School, where he was a five-sport star. Endicott has a little league field named after him, "Johnny Logan Field."

Johnny Logan was of Russian and Croatian descent. His father John Sr., was from Tsaritsyn, now Volgograd, and his mother, Helen Senko, was born in Croatia, but also lived in the borderland of Poland.Logan died at a hospital in Milwaukee on August 9, 2013, age 87.

Marty Marion

Martin Whiteford "Mr. Shortstop" Marion (December 1, 1917 – March 15, 2011) was an American Major League Baseball shortstop and manager. Marion played for the St. Louis Cardinals and the St. Louis Browns between 1940 and 1953. He later became the manager of the Chicago White Sox.

Mike Griffin (outfielder)

Michael Joseph Griffin (March 20, 1865 – April 10, 1908) was an American Major League Baseball center fielder who hailed from Utica, New York. He played in 1511 games spread over 12 seasons for teams in the American Association, Players' League, and National League. He had 1,755 hits, resulting in a .296 batting average, and was a prolific base stealer who swiped 473 bases during his career. In his last year in the majors, he was also the player-manager for the Brooklyn Bridegrooms for a short period of time.

Mike Mansell

Michael R. Mansell (January 15, 1858 in Auburn, New York – December 4, 1902 in Auburn, New York), was a professional baseball outfielder in the Major Leagues from 1879 to 1884. He played for the Syracuse Stars, Cincinnati Stars, Pittsburgh Alleghenys, Philadelphia Athletics, and Richmond Virginians. His brothers John and Tom also played professional baseball.

Roy Johnson

Roy Cleveland Johnson (February 23, 1903 – September 10, 1973) was a left fielder/right fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Detroit Tigers (1929–32), Boston Red Sox (1932–35), New York Yankees (1936–37) and Boston Bees (1937–38). A native of Pryor, Oklahoma, he batted left-handed and threw right-handed. His younger brother, Indian Bob Johnson, also was a major league player.

Sam Barkley

Samuel E. Barkley (May 24, 1858 – April 20, 1912) was an American Major League Baseball second baseman. Born in Wheeling, West Virginia, he played for four teams in six seasons from 1884 to 1889.

Sam Mertes

Samuel Blair Mertes (August 6, 1872 – March 12, 1945) was a professional baseball player. He was an outfielder over parts of 10 seasons (1896–1906) with the Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago Orphans, Chicago White Sox, New York Giants, and St. Louis Cardinals. He led the National League in RBIs in 1903 while playing for New York. He was born in San Francisco, California, and died in Villa Grande, California, at the age of 72.

In 10 seasons, Mertes batted .279 (1227-4405) with 40 home runs and 721 RBI. He stole 396 bases in his career. His on-base percentage was .346 and slugging percentage was .398. He had 100+ RBI seasons in 1903 and 1905.

Sherry Magee

Sherwood Robert "Sherry" Magee (August 6, 1884 – March 13, 1929) was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. From 1904 through 1919, Magee played with the Philadelphia Phillies (1904–14), Boston Braves (1915–1917) and Cincinnati Reds (1917–1919). He batted and threw right-handed and in a 16-season career posted a .291 batting average with 83 home runs and 1,176 runs batted in through 2,087 games played.

Steve Evans (baseball)

Louis Richard (Steve) Evans (February 17, 1885 – December 28, 1943) was a right fielder in Major League Baseball.

Evans was born and died in Cleveland, Ohio. He signed his first professional contract in 1907 with Dayton of the Class-B Central League. From 1908 through 1915, he played in the National League with the New York Giants (1908) and St. Louis Cardinals (1910–13), and in the Federal League for the Brooklyn Tip-Tops (1914–15) and Baltimore Terrapins (1915). Evans batted and threw left-handed.

In an eight-season career, Evans posted a .287 batting average with 32 home runs and 466 RBI in 978 games played. He added 478 runs, 963 hits, 175 doubles, 67 triples and 86 stolen bases.

Tom Daly (infielder)

Thomas Peter Daly (February 7, 1866 – October 29, 1938) was a catcher and second baseman who played in the Major Leagues from 1887 to 1903. He played for the Chicago Cubs, Washington Nationals, Brooklyn Dodgers, Chicago White Sox and Cincinnati Reds.

His brother, Joe Daly, also played professional baseball.

General
Batting
leaders
Baserunning
leaders
Pitching
leaders
Fielding
leaders
Managing
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Multiple stat
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