List of Ferrari engines

This is a list of internal combustion engines manufactured by Ferrari.

Straight-2

Ferrari was rare among automobile manufacturers in attempting to build a straight-2 automobile engine. The racing prototype never made it to production.

  • Lampredi
    • 1955 2493 cc - Tipo 116 - prototype

Straight-3

During the 90s Ferrari developed an experimental straight-3 two-stroke engine.

  • Tipo F134
    • 1994 1347 cc - prototype

Straight-4

Lampredi designed a straight-4 engine for Formula Two use. Different versions of this engine were later used in Formula One and sports car racing.

Straight-6

Lampredi also modified his four into a straight-6 for racing use.

V6

Ferrari's Dino project of the 1956 gave birth to the company's well-known 65° V6 DOHC engines. This Vittorio Jano design formed the basis of the company's modern engines right up through the mid-2000s (decade). Another series of V6 engines was started in 1958 with a 60° V-angle and single overhead camshafts design.

V8

1984 Ferrari 308 GTB qv engine
3.0 L Quattrovalvole V8 in a 1984 Ferrari 308 GTB

The first V8 engine was derived from a Lancia project, used in D50 F1 racecar. The Dino V8 family lasted from the early 1970s through 2004 when it was replaced by a new Ferrari/Maserati design.

V10

Ferrari used V10 engines only for F1 racecars, between 1996 and 2005.

V12/Flat-12

Ferrari 312-412 0744 at Monterey 2008 (machine)
Jano V12 in a 1958 Ferrari 412 S
2001 Ferrari 550 engine
Tipo 133 V12 in a 2001 Ferrari 550

Ferrari is best known for its V12 and flat-12 (horizontally opposed cylinder) engines.

See also

References

  1. ^ http://8w.forix.com/6thgear/engine-designers.html
Ferrari

Ferrari (; Italian: [ferˈraːri]) is an Italian luxury sports car manufacturer based in Maranello. Founded by Enzo Ferrari in 1939 out of Alfa Romeo's race division as Auto Avio Costruzioni, the company built its first car in 1940. However, the company's inception as an auto manufacturer is usually recognized in 1947, when the first Ferrari-badged car was completed.

In 2014 Ferrari was rated the world's most powerful brand by Brand Finance. In June 2018, the 1964 250 GTO became the most expensive car in history, setting an all-time record selling price of $70 million.Fiat S.p.A. acquired 50% of Ferrari in 1969 and expanded its stake to 90% in 1988. In October 2014 Fiat Chrysler Automobiles N.V. (FCA) announced its intentions to separate Ferrari S.p.A. from FCA; as of the announcement FCA owned 90% of Ferrari.

The separation began in October 2015 with a restructuring that established Ferrari N.V. (a company incorporated in the Netherlands) as the new holding company of the Ferrari group and the subsequent sale by FCA of 10% of the shares in an IPO and concurrent listing of common shares on the New York Stock Exchange. Through the remaining steps of the separation, FCA's interest in Ferrari's business was distributed to shareholders of FCA, with 10% continuing to be owned by Piero Ferrari. The spin-off was completed on 3 January 2016.Throughout its history, the company has been noted for its continued participation in racing, especially in Formula One, where it is the oldest and most successful racing team, holding the most constructors championships (16) and having produced the highest number of drivers' championship wins (15). Ferrari road cars are generally seen as a symbol of speed, luxury and wealth.

Ferrari Colombo engine

The Ferrari Colombo Engine was a petrol fueled, water cooled, carburetted 60° V12 engine designed by Gioacchino Colombo and produced in numerous iterations by Italian automaker Ferrari between 1947 and 1988. The design team also included Giuseppe Busso and Luigi Bazzi.Colombo had formerly designed Alfa Romeos for Enzo Ferrari. These V12 powerplants ranged from the diminutive 1,497 cc (1.5 L; 91.4 cu in) unit fitted to the 125S to the 4,943 cc (4.9 L; 301.6 cu in) unit in the 1986 412i. Colombo designed bore centres at 90 mm apart. Significant updates were made in 1963 for the 330 series featuring a redesigned block with wider, 94 mm, bore spacing.Enzo Ferrari had long admired the V12 engines of Packard, Auto Union, and Alfa Romeo

(where he was long employed), but his first car, the 1940 Auto Avio Costruzioni 815, used a Fiat straight-8. Ferrari's first homegrown engine was a V12 designed by Colombo, with development continuing long after original designer Colombo had been replaced by Aurelio Lampredi as the company's marquee engine designer. Although Lampredi's engines were a real force for the company, it was Colombo's V12 which would be the primary motivator for the company's consumer products through the 1950s and 1960s.

Ferrari Dino engine

The Ferrari Dino engine is a line of mechanically similar V6 and V8 engines produced by Ferrari for about 40 years from late 1950s into the early 2000s.

Alfredo "Dino" Ferrari was the son of Enzo Ferrari. Dino suggested to Enzo Ferrari the development of a V6 engine for F2 at the end of 1955. Soon afterwards, Alfredo fell ill, suffering from muscular dystrophy. While hospitalized, he discussed technical details with the engineer Vittorio Jano. Dino would never see the engine; he died on June 30, 1956 at the age of 24.

The Dino V6 was Ferrari's first V6 engine. The Dino V8 engine was introduced later. The V8 engines all used a flat-plane crankshaft configuration.

Ferrari F116/F133 engine

The F116 engine family is a series of 65° DOHC V12 petrol engines produced by Ferrari since 1992. Introduced with the 456 GT, this engine had a displacement of 5.5 L and was a fresh new design who replaced the previous Colombo-derived F101 60° V12 engines used in Ferrari 412 four-seater.

A more performant variant named F133 debuted in 1996 with the 550 Maranello, replacing the F113 flat-12 engines.The production of the F116 ceased in 2003; in the same period the F133's displacement was increased to 5.7 L and lasted until 2011. It was then replaced by the F140 engine family.

All those engines featured dry sump lubrication and 48 valves driven by dual overhead camshafts per bank. The block and cylinder heads were constructed from light alloy, featuring Nikasil treated alloy cylinder liners. A Bosch Motronic 2.7 combined fuel injection/ignition engine management system was initially fitted, superseded by a Motronic 5.2 unit in 1996 and by a Motronic ME7 system for the 5.7 L versions.

Ferrari F154 engine

The Ferrari F154 is a family of modular twin-turbocharged, direct injected V8 petrol engines designed and produced by Ferrari since 2013. It is a replacement for the naturally aspirated Ferrari/Maserati F136 V8 family on both Maserati and Ferrari cars.

They are the first turbocharged Ferrari road engines since the 1987 2.9-litre F120A V8 of the Ferrari F40.

Ferrari Jano engine

Vittorio Jano designed a new 60° V12 engine for sports car racing for Ferrari. This new engine, introduced in 1956, combined elements of both Colombo and Lampredi engines with new features. Engine architecture was more of Lampredi school but retained smaller Colombo internal measurements. Jano moved to Ferrari along with his designs for Lancia D50 in 1955 and went on to design not only a new V12 but also a family of Dino V6 engines soon after. Some of the technical ideas came from Jano's Lancia V8 DOHC engine, intended for Formula One. This family of engines replaced Lampredi inline-4s known from Ferrari Monza line and went on to win many international races and titles for Ferrari. The design team comprised Jano as well as Vittorio Bellentani, Alberto Massimino (best known for Maserati 250F), and Andrea Fraschetti.

All Jano engines used dry sump lubrication and almost all of them had two spark plugs per cylinder with four coils. Also most of them had DOHC configuration with chain-driven camshafts and two valves per cylinder.

Ferrari Lampredi engine

Aurelio Lampredi designed a number of racing engines for Ferrari. He was brought on to hedge the company's bets with a different engine family than the small V12s designed by Gioacchino Colombo. Lampredi went on to design a number of different Inline-4, Inline-6, and V12 engines through the 1950s, and it was these that would power the company's string of world championships that decade. All were quickly abandoned, however, with the Dino V6 and V8 taking the place of the fours and sixes and evolution of the older Colombo V12 continuing as the company's preeminent V12.

Ferrari engines

Ferrari engines might refer to:

List of Ferrari engines

Ferrari Lampredi engine

Ferrari Dino engine

Ferrari Colombo engine

Ferrari flat-12 engine

The Ferrari flat-12 engine family is a series of 180° V12 DOHC petrol engines produced by Ferrari from 1973 to 1996. Introduced with the 365 GT4/BB, this engine shared its construction with the flat-12 race-engines used in the 312B and 312 PB, but its displacement, bore & stroke, rods and pistons were the same as the Tipo 251 60° V12 Colombo engine powering the Daytona it replaced.Design and development of the new engine was overseen by Ferrari engineers Giuliano de Angelis and Angelo Bellei.The engine was the first flat-12 cylinder configuration fitted in a Ferrari road car and had factory type reference F102A. It had two valves per cylinder and twin overhead camshafts per bank, although these were now belt driven, instead of by chain as on earlier Ferrari 12-cylinder engines. It was fitted with two banks of two triple-choke Weber 40IF3C carburettors and an electronic ignition system. The block and cylinder heads were constructed from light alloy and featured wet sump lubrication.

In 1976 Ferrari launched a revised version of the BB, the 512 BB, with a flat-12 engine enlarged to 4943cc. Named F102B, it featured a dry sump lubrication system to help the car scavenge oil.In 1981 the 512 BBi replaced the outgoing model’s four triple-choke carburettors with a Bosch K-Jetronic mechanical fuel injection. The new engine got factory type reference F110A but otherwise it was mechanically identical to its predecessor.With the debut of Testarossa in 1984, the evolution of the flat-12 engine saw it equipped with four valves per cylinder: with 390 PS (287 kW; 385 hp) it was the most powerful engine mounted on a production sports car at the time of its launch. It maintained the same cubic capacity of 4943cc of the 512 BBi model, and had factory type reference number F113A. It was fitted with a Marelli Microplex MED120 electronic ignition system and Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection. Export versions for United States, Canada and Japan had catalytic converter and KE-Jetronic fuel injection. European versions got those features in 1986 and the revised engine was known as F113B.The 1991 512 TR had an upgraded version of the engine used in the Testarossa, maintaining the same cubic capacity of 4.9 L, and had factory type reference number F113D. Changes were made to the porting, with redesigned inlet plenums and larger valves providing more efficient fuel/air mix ingress, whilst the fuel injection and ignition system were changed to a combined Bosch Motronic M2.7 system.For the 1994 F512M the engine was further upgraded with a lightened crankshaft, titanium alloy connecting rods, new pistons and a stainless steel low backpressure exhaust system.The flat-12 production ceased with the F512M, being replaced by the front-engined 550 Maranello which featured the new 65° V12 F133 engine.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.