List of Democratic-Republican Party presidential tickets

This is a list of Democratic-Republican Party candidates for the offices of President of the United States and Vice President of the United States.

List of Democratic-Republican tickets

Election Presidential candidate[1][2] Vice presidential candidate[1][2]
Candidate
(Birth–Death)
Office at time
of election[a]
Home
State[b]
EV%[c] Candidate
(Birth–Death)
Office at time
of election[a]
Home
State[b]
EV%[d]
1796[e] Thomas Jefferson
(1743–1826)[4]
Unsuccessful 1796 Fmr. Secretary of State VA 49.3% Aaron Burr
(1756–1836)[5]
Burr (cropped 3x4) Senator NY 22.2%
1800 Vice President 52.9% 52.9%
1804 President 92% George Clinton
(1739–1812)[6]
George Clinton by Ezra Ames (cropped 4x3 closein) Governor NY 92%
1808 James Madison
(1751–1836)[7]
James Madison (cropped 3x4 close) Secretary of State VA 69.7% Vice President 64.6%
1812 President 59% Elbridge Gerry
(1744–1814)[8]
Elbridge-gerry-painting (cropped 3x4 close) Fmr. Governor MA 59%
1816 James Monroe
(1758–1831)[9]
James Monroe White House portrait 1819 (cropped 3x4 close) Secretary of State VA 84.3% Daniel D. Tompkins
(1774–1825)[10]
DTompkins (cropped 3x4 close) Governor NY 84.3%
1820 President 99.6% Vice President 94%
1824[f] John Quincy Adams
(1767–1848)[12]
Unsuccessful 1828 President MA 32.2% John C. Calhoun
(1782–1850)[13]
John C. Calhoun (cropped 3x4 close).jpeg Secretary of War SC 69.7%
Andrew Jackson
(1767–1845)[14]
Unsuccessful 1824 Major General TN 37.9%
William H. Crawford
(1772–1834)[15]
Unsuccessful 1824 2 Secretary of the Treasury GA 15.7% Nathaniel Macon
(1757–1837)[16]
NC-Congress-NathanielMacon (cropped 3x4) Senator GA 9.2%
Henry Clay
(1777–1852)[17]
Unsuccessful 1824 3 Speaker of the House KY 14.2% Nathan Sanford
(1777–1838)[18]
NathanSanford (cropped 3x4) State judge[g] NY 11.5%

Other candidates

In addition to the individuals listed above, other Democratic-Republicans received electoral votes between 1792 and 1824. In the 1792 election, George Washington effectively ran unopposed for president, but the nascent Democratic-Republican Party attempted to defeat Vice President John Adams's bid for re-election through the candidacy of George Clinton.[19] Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr also received votes in that election. In the 1796 election, Clinton, Samuel Adams, and John Henry each received votes. In the 1808 election, John Langdon, James Madison, and James Monroe all received votes for vice president, while Clinton received a small number of votes for president. In the 1824 election, Martin Van Buren received nine electoral votes for vice president.[1] During that same election, the Democratic-Republican congressional nominating caucus nominated a ticket consisting of William H. Crawford and former Secretary of the Treasury Albert Gallatin, but Gallatin ultimately withdrew from the race.[20]

In the 1812 election, Madison's main opponent, DeWitt Clinton, was nominated for president by a legislative caucus of New York Democratic-Republicans. The Federalist Party did not officially nominate Clinton, but most Federalist leaders tacitly supported Clinton's candidacy in hopes of defeating Madison.[21]

Notes

  1. ^ a b The most recent elective office, or senior appointive position, held by the candidate either on election day or in November of the election year.
  2. ^ a b State of primary residence.
  3. ^ For elections held prior to 1804, this column represents the share of electors who cast a vote for the candidate. For elections held since 1804, this column represents the share of the total electoral vote for president won by the candidate.
  4. ^ For elections held prior to 1804, this column represents the share of electors who cast a vote for the candidate. For elections held since 1804, this column represents the share of the total electoral vote for vice president won by the candidate.
  5. ^ Prior to the ratification of the Twelfth Amendment in 1804, each member of the Electoral College cast two votes, with no distinction made between votes for president and votes for vice president.[2] The Democratic-Republicans may or may not have officially nominated Jefferson for president through a congressional nominating caucus, but Jefferson was widely regarded as the party's main presidential candidate in the 1796 election. The Democratic-Republicans did not select an official vice presidential candidate. Aaron Burr finished with the second-most electoral votes among individuals affiliated with the party.[3] Because Jefferson won more electoral votes than the second Federalist candidate, Thomas Pinckney, he was elected as vice president.[2]
  6. ^ The Democratic-Republican Party was unable to unite behind a single candidate in 1824.[11] Four Democratic-Republicans received electoral votes in the general election, and, as no candidate won a majority of the electoral vote, the election was decided in a contingent election held in the House of Representatives. John Quincy Adams won that contingent election.[2] Most presidential electors who voted for either Adams or Jackson for president voted for John C. Calhoun for vice president. Similarly, most electors who cast their presidential vote for Clay cast their vice presidential vote for Nathaniel Macon, and most electors who cast their presidential vote for Crawford cast their vice presidential vote for Nathan Sanford.[2]
  7. ^ Sanford was the Chancellor of New York, the highest-ranking judge in the state. He had also served in the United States Senate.[18]

References

  1. ^ a b c "Electoral College Box Scores 1789–1996". National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved 16 September 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "United States Presidential Election Results". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved 16 September 2018.
  3. ^ Morgan (1969), pp. 185–186
  4. ^ "Jefferson, Thomas, (1743–1826)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved September 21, 2018.
  5. ^ "BURR, Aaron, (1756 - 1836)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved September 26, 2018.
  6. ^ "CLINTON, George, (1739 - 1812)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved September 26, 2018.
  7. ^ "Madison, James, (1743–1826)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved July 1, 2019.
  8. ^ "Monroe, James, (1744–1814)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved July 1, 2019.
  9. ^ "Monroe, James, (1758–1831)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved July 1, 2019.
  10. ^ "Tompkins, Daniel D. (1774–1825)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved July 1, 2019.
  11. ^ Morgan (1969), p. 195
  12. ^ "Adams, John Quincy, (1767–1848)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved September 21, 2018.
  13. ^ "Calhoun, John Caldwell (1782–1850)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved July 1, 2019.
  14. ^ "Jackson, Andrew, (1767–1845)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved September 21, 2018.
  15. ^ "Crawford, William Harris, (1772–1834)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved September 21, 2018.
  16. ^ "MACON, Nathaniel, (1757 - 1837)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved September 26, 2018.
  17. ^ "Clay, Henry, (1777–1852)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved September 21, 2018.
  18. ^ a b "SANFORD, Nathan, (1777 - 1838)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved September 26, 2018.
  19. ^ Thompson (1980), pp. 174–175
  20. ^ Walters (1957), pp. 320–324
  21. ^ Siry (1985), pp. 457–460

Works cited

  • Morgan, William G. (1969). "The Origin and Development of the Congressional Nominating Caucus". Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society. 113 (2): 184–196. JSTOR 985965.
  • Siry, Steven Edwin (1985). "The Sectional Politics of "Practical Republicanism": De Witt Clinton's Presidential Bid, 1810–1812". Journal of the Early Republic. 5 (4): 441–462. JSTOR 3123061.
  • Walters, Raymond, Jr. (1957). Albert Gallatin: Jeffersonian Financier and Diplomat. Macmillan. ISBN 978-0822952107.
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