List of African-American women in STEM fields

The following is a list of notable African-American women who have made contributions to the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

A

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
Lilia Ann Abron chemical engineering, environmental engineering 1945- first African-American woman to earn a PhD in chemical engineering
Claudia Alexander Claudia Alexander geophysics, planetary science 1959-2015 Project manager for NASA's Galileo misson and Rosetta mission
Gloria Long Anderson chemistry 1938-
Treena Livingston Arinzeh biomedical engineering 1970-
Donna Auguste businesswoman, computer scientist 1958-
DrWandaMAustin Wanda Austin aerospace engineering 1954- Former president and CEO of The Aerospace Corporation

B

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
June Bacon-Bercey June Bacon-Bercey meteorology 1932-
Alicia Augusta Ball Alice Augusta Ball meteorology 1892-1916 first woman and African-American to receive a master's degree from the University of Hawaii
Patriciabath Patricia Bath ophthalmologist, inventor 1942-
Regina Benjamin official portrait Regina Benjamin physician 1956- 18th Surgeon General of the United States
Angela Benton internet entrepreneur 1981-
Matilene Berryman oceanographer 1920-2003
Sarah Boone inventor 1832-1904
Sylvia D. Trimble Bozeman mathematician 1947-
Carolyn Brooks microbiologist 1947-
Dorothy Lavinia Brown surgeon 1919-2004 First African American female appointed to a general surgery residency in the racially segregated South. [1]
Marjorie Lee Brown mathematician 1914-1979
Kimberly Bryant, Black Girls Code @ SXSW 2016 Kimberly Bryant electrical engineer
Ursula-Burns Ursula Burns engineer, CEO 1958-

C

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
Alexa-Canady Alexa Canady neuroscience 1950-
Carolyn Cannon-Alfred pharmacologist 1934-
Majora Carter developer 1966-
Gloria Chisum experimental psychologist 1930-
Mamie Phipps Clark social psychologist 1917-1983 Researched self-esteem and self-concept in African-American children, which was used in 1954 civil rights case Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka Kansas [2]
May Edward Chinn 1917 May Edward Chinn physician 1896-1980
YvonneYoungClark Yvonne Clark engineer 1929-
Jewel Plummer Cobb biologist 1924-2017
Dr. Johnnetta Cole, Director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art Johnnetta Cole anthropologist, educator and museum director 1936- Spelman College's seventh president and the first Black woman to lead the institution [3]
Rebecca Cole physician 1846-1922 Second African-American woman physician
Bessie Coleman, First African American Pilot - GPN-2004-00027 Bessie Coleman aviator 1896–1926 first African American and Native American woman to hold a pilot license [2]
Betty Collette veterinary pathologist 1930-2017
Margaret S. Collins zoologist 1922-1996
Carol Blanche Cotton psychologist 1904-?
Patricia S Cowings NASA Publications Photo Patricia S. Cowings aerospace psychophysiologist 1948- 'first African American woman scientist to be trained as an astronaut by NASA
Rebecca Lee Crumpler physician 1831–1895 first African-American woman to become a physician in the United States

D

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
Marie Maynard Daly Marie Maynard Daly biochemist 1921–2003 first African-American woman to earn a Ph.D. in chemistry
Christine Darden Christine Darden aerospace engineer 1942- Researcher at NASA where she was a pioneer in the design of supersonic aircraft [2]
Geraldine Claudette Darden mathematician 1936-
Mary Deconge mathematician 1933-
Giovonnae Dennis electrical engineer
Helen Octavia Dickens physician 1909–2001
Eugenia Dunn biologist
Georgia Mae Dunston Human Geneticist 1944- Professor at Howard University and founder of the National Human Genome Center
Barbara Dyce biochemist

E

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
Annie Easley Annie Easley mathematician and rocket scientist 1933–2011
Cecile H. Edwards nutritionist 1926–2005
Joycelyn Elders official photo portrait Joycelyn Elders pediatrician 1933- Surgeon General of the United States
Dale Emeagwali microbiologist 1954-
Anna Epps microbiologist 1930-
Jeanette J. Epps Jeanette J. Epps astronaut and aerospace engineer 1970-
Aprille Ericsson Aprille Ericsson-Jackson aerospace engineer 1963-
Princilla Evans biochemist
Brittney Exline software engineer [4]

F

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
Etta Zuber Falconer mathematician 1933-2002
Angella D. Ferguson pediatrician 1925- researcher of sickle cell disease
Evefields Evelyn J. Fields oceanographer 1949-
Eleanor Ison Franklin endocrinologist
Njema Frazier nuclear physicist
A. Oveta Fuller virologist 1955-

G

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
Vicki Gambrell
Sadie Gassaway mathematician
Gloria Ford Gilmer mathematician
Sarah E. Goode inventor 1855–1905
Evelyn Boyd Granville mathematician, computer science 1924-
Bettye Washington Greene at work Bettye Washington Greene chemist 1935- 1995
Eliza Ann Grier Eliza Ann Grier physician 1864–1902
Margaret Grigsby physician
Bessie Blount Griffin physical therapist, inventor 1914–2009
Dr. Natasha A. Greene Physicist, Nuclear Health Physicist, Meteorologist 1975- Dr. Greene is noted as the first to earn a PhD in Atmospheric Physics from Howard University. She currently works in Federal Government at the US NRC.

H

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
Betty Harris chemist 1940-
Mary Styles Harris geneticist 1949-
Alma Levant Hayden (cropped) Alma Levant Hayden chemist 1927-1967
Haynes euphemia Euphemia Lofton Haynes mathematician 1890-1980 First Afircan-American woman to earn a PhD in Mathematics
Ruby Puryear Hearn biophysicist 1940-
Gloria Conyers Hewitt mathematician 1935-
Mary Elliott Hill chemist 1907-1969
Stephanie Hill engineer [5][6]
Jane Hinton veterinarian 1919-2003
Esther A. H. Hopkins chemist 1926- [7]
Ruth Winifred Howard psychologist 1900-1997
Fern Hunt Fern Hunt mathematician 1948-
Yasmin Hurd Yasmin Hurd neuroscientist
Kaitlyn Haley litologist

I

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
Jedidah Isler astrophysicist

J

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
Deborah J. Jackson aeronautical engineer
Fatimah Jackson biological anthropologist
Shirley Ann Jackson World Economic Forum 2010 Shirley Ann Jackson physicist 1946- President of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Dr. Mae C. Jemison, First African-American Woman in Space - GPN-2004-00020 Mae Jemison astronaut and physician 1956- first African American woman to travel in space [8]
Allene Johnson chemist 1933– [9]
Ashanti Johnson Ashanti Johnson geochemist and oceanographer
Katherine Johnson in 2008 Katherine Johnson mathematician 1918- calculated the trajectories for many NASA missions, including Apollo 11
Tracy L. Johnson molecular and cell biologist
Anna R Johnson Anna Johnson Julian sociologist 1903-1994
Lynda Marie Jordan biochemist 1956– [10]

K

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
Sinah Estelle Kelley chemist 1916-1982 worked on mass production of penicillin [11]
Mary Beatrice Davidson Kenner 1912- [12]
Angie Turner King chemist and mathematician 1905–2004 [13]
Reatha King 2009 Reatha King 1938-

L

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
Lisa Lambert [14][15]
[16][17][18]
Margaret-Morgan-Lawrence Margaret Morgan Lawrence pediatric psychiatrist 1914- researched negative psychological effects of segregation on Black children [19]
Kathryn Emanuel Lawson chemist 1926–2008 [20]
Lillian Burwell Lewis zoolologist
Ruth Smith Lloyd anatomist 1917-1995
Irene-D-Long-NASA Irene Long 1951-
Beebe Steven Lynk chemist 1872– [21]

M

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
Shirley Malcom Shirley M. Malcom science administrator 1946- head of education and human resources programs at AAAS [22]
Harriet Marble pharmacist 1885-1966 early African-American woman pharmacist
Cora Bagley Marrett Cora Bagley Marrett sociologist, science administrator 1942- [23]
Pamela McCauley-Bush [24][25]
Dorothy McClendon microbiologist 1924- [26]
Kyla McMullen
Linda C. Meade-Tollin biochemist 1944– [27]
Juanita Merchant
Shireen Mitchell
Ruth Ella Moore bacteriology 1903–1994 first African-American woman with PhD in a natural science, department head at Howard University
Tanya Moore [28]

N

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
Ann T. Nelms
Lydia Newman [26]

O

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
Joan Murrell Owens marine biologist 1933- expert on button corals [29]

P

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
Carolyn Beatrice Parker Carolyn Parker mathematician, physicist 1917–1966 worked on the Dayton Project, the plutonium research and development arm of the Manhattan Project

first African-American woman known to have gained a postgraduate degree in physics

Jennie Patrick chemical engineering 1949– [30]
Hattie Scott Peterson civil engineer 1913–1993 believed to be the first African-American woman to gain a bachelor's degree in civil engineering
Vivian-Pinn-2010 Vivian W. Pinn pathologist 1941- Director of the Office of Research on Women’s Health at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) [31]
Duck-Research-Laboratory Jessie Isabelle Price veterinary microbiologist 1930-2015 isolated and reproduced the cause of the most common life-threatening disease in duck farming in the 1950s [32]
Talking About the Colony (5196965089) Sian Proctor African American explorer, scientist, STEM communicator, and aspiring astronaut geology, sustainability and planetary science professor
Johnnie Hines Watts Prothro chemist 1922–2009 food chemistry and nutrition [33]

R

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
Mary Logan Reddick neuroembryologist, biologist 1914 - 1966 possibly the first African-American woman scientist to receive a fellowship to study abroad, and the first female biology instructor at Morehouse College
Eslanda Goode Robeson chemist 1896–1965 [34]
Gladys W. Royal chemist 1926–2002 [35]

S

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
Antoinette Rodez Schiesler chemist, director of research at Villanova University 1934 - 1996
Cheryl-Shavers Cheryl L. Shavers semiconductor engineering and management 1953- first African-American Undersecretary of Commerce for Science and Technology [36]
Mabel Keaton Staupers Nursing administrator 1890 - 1989 Instrumental in implementing the desegregation of the U.S. Army Nurse Corps during WWII [37]
Susan McKinney Steward full Susan McKinney Steward pediatrician, homeopath 1847-1918 the third African-American woman to earn a medical degree, and the first in New York state.
Thyrsa Frazier Svager Thyrsa Frazier Svager mathematician 1930-1999 one of the first African-American women to receive a PhD in mathematics
Latanya Sweeney at a Knight News Challenge event in New York City, November 2017 Latanya Sweeney computer scientist computer scientist best known for work on k-anonymity
Alberta Jones Seaton embryologist, biologist 1924-2014 One of the first African-American women awarded a doctorate in zoology, in Belgium in 1949.

T

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
NASA photo of data scientist Valerie L. Thomas Valerie Thomas physicist and inventor 1943- Inventor of the Illusion Transmitter
Overseer of NASA's Landsat program, international expert in Landsat data products
Lisette Titre [28]
Margaret E. M. Tolbert chemist and science administrator 1943- the first African American and the first woman in charge of a Department of Energy lab [38]
Rubye Prigmore Torrey chemist 1926– [39]

W

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
Dawn Ward synthetic chemist 1973- [40]
Jessica profile picture Jessica Ware evolutionary biologist, entomologist. work on phylogenomics of insect evolution
Marguerite Williams geologist 1895 – 1991? the first African American to earn a doctorate in geology in the United States
Geraldine Pittman Woods science administrator 1921–1999 known for her lifelong dedication to community service and for establishing programs that promote minorities in STEM fields, scientific research, and basic research [41]
Biophoto2 Dawn Wright oceanographer, geographer 1961- expert in seafloor mapping, marine geographic information systems [42][43]
Jane Cooke Wright Jane C. Wright cancer researcher, surgeon 1919-2013 pioneering cancer researcher and surgeon noted for her contributions to chemotherapy

Y

Image Name Field(s) Dates Notes Ref.
Josephine Silone Yates chemist 1859-1912 [44]
Chavonda J. Jacobs Young

See also

Further reading

  • Brown, Jeannette E. (2012). African American women chemists. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 143–150. ISBN 9780199742882.
  • Carey, Charles W. (2008). African Americans in science: an encyclopedia of people and progress. 1. Santa Barbara, Calif.: ABC-CLIO. pp. 51–52. ISBN 9781851099986.
  • "STEM Equity Pipeline – Resources – Online Resources". NAPE – National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity. Archived from the original on 2015-02-22. Retrieved 2015-02-23.
  • Rice, Delores. "The Career Experiences of African American Female Engineers" (PDF). Retrieved 2015-02-23.
  • Robelin, Erik W (2010-03-22). "Education Week: U.S. Gets Poor Grades in Nurturing STEM Diversity". Education Week. Retrieved 2015-02-23.
  • Sullivan, Otha Richard (2002). African American women scientists and inventors. Black stars. New York: Wiley. ISBN 047138707X.
  • [45][46][47]

References

  1. ^ "Brown, Dorothy Lavinia (1919-2004)". BlackPast.org. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c Hine, Darlene Clark (2005). Black Women in American History. New York, New York: Oxford University Press. p. 257. ISBN 9780195223743.
  3. ^ "About Johnnetta B. Cole, Ph.D." Spelman College's Presidents Office about page. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  4. ^ Christian, Margena A. (2012-01-10). "Brittney Exline Becomes Nation's Youngest African-American Engineer". Careers & Finance – EBONY. Retrieved 2015-02-23.
  5. ^ Rowley, Dorothy (2014-01-01). "Lockheed Martin's Stephanie Hill wins Black Engineering Award". Washington Informer. Archived from the original on 2015-02-23. Retrieved 2015-02-23.
  6. ^ de Vise, Daniel. "Why the nation needs more female engineers". The Washington Post – College, Inc. Retrieved 2015-02-23.
  7. ^ Brown, Jeannette E. (2012). African American women chemists. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 92–99. ISBN 9780199742882.
  8. ^ Hine, Darlene Clarke (2005). Black Women in America. New York, New York: Oxford University Press. p. 140. ISBN 9780195223750.
  9. ^ Brown, Jeannette E. (2012). African American women chemists. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 56–60. ISBN 9780199742882.
  10. ^ Brown, Jeannette E. (2012). African American women chemists. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 84–91. ISBN 9780199742882.
  11. ^ Brown, Jeannette E. (2012). African American women chemists. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 108–111. ISBN 9780199742882.
  12. ^ Sullivan, Otha Richard (2002). African American women scientists and inventors. Black stars. New York: Wiley. pp. 47–49. ISBN 047138707X.
  13. ^ Brown, Jeannette E. (2012). African American women chemists. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 27–29. ISBN 9780199742882.
  14. ^ Dickey, Megan Rose (2013-04-04). "Most Influential Blacks In Technology". Business Insider. Retrieved 2015-02-23.
  15. ^ "Lisa Lambert, Intel Capital". ecorner – Stanford University's Entrepreneurship Corner:. Retrieved 2015-02-25.
  16. ^ "Lisa Lambert shares her Lean In story". Lean In. Retrieved 2015-02-25.
  17. ^ "Lisa Lambert, Intel Capital Corp: Profile & Biography". Bloomberg. Retrieved 2015-02-25.
  18. ^ "Lisa Lambert, Intel Capital – Investing for Market Strategy and Capital". ecorner – Stanford University's Entrepreneurship Corner:. Retrieved 2015-02-25.
  19. ^ Carey, Charles W. (2008). African Americans in science: an encyclopedia of people and progress. 1. Santa Barbara, Calif.: ABC-CLIO. pp. 142–144. ISBN 9781851099986.
  20. ^ Brown, Jeannette E. (2012). African American women chemists. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 111–114. ISBN 9780199742882.
  21. ^ Brown, Jeannette E. (2012). African American women chemists. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 18–19. ISBN 9780199742882.
  22. ^ Carey, Charles W. (2008). African Americans in science: an encyclopedia of people and progress. 1. Santa Barbara, Calif.: ABC-CLIO. pp. 150–152. ISBN 9781851099986.
  23. ^ "Cora Bagley Marrett". National Academy of Sciences, African American History Program. Retrieved 2015-02-24.
  24. ^ "UCF's McCauley-Bush is Engineering Role Model for Black History Month". UCF Today – Orlando, FL. Retrieved 2015-02-23.
  25. ^ "UCF Engineering Professor Pamela McCauley Bush Among Top Women in Technology Recognized by Connected World Magazine". 2014-03-24. Retrieved 2015-02-23.
  26. ^ a b "Famous African American Women in STEM" (PDF). NAPE – National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-01-24. Retrieved 2015-02-23.
  27. ^ Brown, Jeannette E. (2012). African American women chemists. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 74–83. ISBN 9780199742882.
  28. ^ a b Talbert, Marcia Wade (2011-03-01). "Women In STEM – Black Enterprise". Retrieved 2015-02-23.
  29. ^ Carey, Charles W. (2008). African Americans in science: an encyclopedia of people and progress. 1. Santa Barbara, Calif.: ABC-CLIO. pp. 169–171. ISBN 9781851099986.
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  31. ^ "Vivian W. Pinn". National Academy of Sciences, African American History Program. Retrieved 2015-02-24.
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  33. ^ Brown, Jeannette E. (2012). African American women chemists. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 42–46. ISBN 9780199742882.
  34. ^ Brown, Jeannette E. (2012). African American women chemists. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 24–27. ISBN 9780199742882.
  35. ^ Brown, Jeannette E. (2012). African American women chemists. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 49–51. ISBN 9780199742882.
  36. ^ Brown, Jeannette E. (2012). African American women chemists. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 135–142. ISBN 9780199742882.
  37. ^ Hine, Darlene Clarke (2005). Black Woman in America. New York, New York: Oxford University Press. p. 188. ISBN 9780195223767.
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  39. ^ Brown, Jeannette E. (2012). African American women chemists. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 46–49. ISBN 9780199742882.
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  42. ^ NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, Maritime Heritage Program. "Deep Sea Dawn". Voyage to Discovery: Untold Stories of African-Americans and the Sea. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 23 March 2016.
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