Lisle Blackbourn

Lisle William "Liz" Blackbourn (June 3, 1899 – June 14, 1983) was an American football coach in Wisconsin,[1] most notably as the third head coach of the Green Bay Packers, from 1954 through 1957, and the final head coach at Marquette University in Milwaukee in 1960.[2][3]

Lisle Blackbourn
Biographical details
BornJune 3, 1899
Beetown, Wisconsin
DiedJune 14, 1983 (aged 84)
Lancaster, Wisconsin
Alma materLawrence College, 1925
Playing career
1918, 1921–23Lawrence
Position(s)Lineman
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1924Lawrence (freshmen)
1925–1946Washington HS (WI)
1947Wisconsin (scout)
1948Wisconsin (backs)
1949Marquette (line)
1950–1953Marquette
1954–1957Green Bay Packers
1958Carroll (WI)
1959–1960Marquette

Early years

Born in Beetown, Wisconsin, in 1899,[4] Blackbourn attended high school in Lancaster and played college football at Lawrence College in Appleton, under head coach Mark Catlin, Sr. He arrived on campus in 1918, but left after a semester to work on the family farm for several years, then returned to school.[5] He earned "all-state" honors three times for the Vikings and also was a catcher on the baseball team. While finishing his degree at Lawrence, he coached the Vikings' freshman football team in the fall of 1924.

High school coach

After earning his degree in 1925, he became head coach at Washington High School in Milwaukee and continued for 22 seasons, compiling a 141–30–6 record (.814) through 1946. While remaining as athletic director at the school, he was a scout for the University of Wisconsin–Madison under head coach Harry Stuhldreher.

College coach

In March 1948, Blackbourn resigned from the high school to become the backfield coach at Wisconsin, which was Stuhldreher's last with the Badgers, resigning in December.[6] With a new staff at UW for 1949, Blackbourn moved over to Marquette University in Milwaukee as the line coach under head coach Frank Murray,[7] who stepped down after the season for health reasons and was succeeded by Blackbourne in 1950.[8][9][10] Blackbourne's 1953 team was 6-3-1, the best record at Marquette in over a decade.

Green Bay Packers

Succeeding Gene Ronzani as head coach of the Green Bay Packers, Blackbourn was hired in January 1954.[11][12] He had a 17–31 record (.354) from 1954 through 1957, with no post-season appearances, as the only playoff then was the NFL title game. He was asked to resign at the end of the 1957 season after a disappointing 3–9 campaign, but refused and was fired in January 1958.[2][13][14] While head coach, he drafted many future hall of famers, including Forrest Gregg, Bart Starr, Paul Hornung, Jim Taylor, Jerry Kramer and Ray Nitschke. He was still the Packers head coach during the first part of 1958 NFL Draft, with the first four rounds conducted in early December 1957. The Packers' first four picks are considered among the best by a team in league history. In addition to Taylor, Nitschke and Kramer, linebacker Dan Currie was selected.

Carroll College

After the dismissal by the Packers, Blackbourn became the head coach at Carroll College in Waukesha for a single season in 1958, with a record of 6 wins, 2 losses, and 0 ties. This ranks him 16th at Carroll in total wins and second in winning percentage.[15]

Return to Marquette

Blackbourn was the 16th head coach at Marquette and held that position twice for a total of six seasons, four from 1950 through 1953 and two from 1959 through 1960.[16] His coaching record at Marquette was 24 wins, 30 losses, and 4 ties (.448). He ranks third in total wins at Marquette and twelfth in winning percentage. After the its football program was discontinued in December 1960,[17][18][19][20] he was a scout in professional football for the Packers and others until he retired in 1972.[5][21] Blackbourn was inducted into the Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame in 1978, and died in 1983 in his hometown of Lancaster.[21]

Head coaching record

NFL

Team Year Regular Season
Won Lost Ties Finish
GB 1954 4 8 0 5th in NFL Western Conference
GB 1955 6 6 0 3rd in NFL Western Conference
GB 1956 4 8 0 6th in NFL Western Conference
GB 1957 3 9 0 6th in NFL Western Conference
Total 17 30 0

References

  1. ^ Daniell, Constance (August 10, 1971). "Friends remember Liz". Milwaukee Journal. p. 8, part 2.
  2. ^ a b Sauerberg, George (June 15, 1983). "Blackbourn style impressed team". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 1, part 2.
  3. ^ "Ex-coach Blackbourn dies". Milwaukee Journal. June 14, 1983. p. 1, part 2.
  4. ^ https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XRJL-HF6
  5. ^ a b Johnson, Chuck (April 6, 1967). "Blackbourn could look back with pride, but won't". Milwaukee Journal. p. 13, part 2.
  6. ^ "City coaches give Blackbourn a boost". Milwaukee Journal. January 6, 1949. p. 6, part 2.
  7. ^ Gilka, Bob (March 23, 1948). "Blackbourn is named Marquette line coach". Milwaukee Journal. p. 12, part 2.
  8. ^ "Murray retires; Blackbourn named Marquette coach". Milwaukee Sentinel. December 18, 1949. p. 1, sports.
  9. ^ Lynch, R.G. (January 7, 1954). "Terlep likely Hilltop coach as Packers sign Blackbourn". Milwaukee Journal. p. 17, part 2.
  10. ^ Lawrence Alumni Intercollegiate Athletic Hall of Fame Archived February 5, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  11. ^ "Blackbourn signs 3 year contract to coach Packers". Milwaukee Sentinel. Associated Press. January 8, 1954. p. 4, part 2.
  12. ^ "Blackbourn appointed head coach of Packers". Milwaukee Journal. January 7, 1954. p. 1, part 1.
  13. ^ Lea, Bud (January 7, 1958). "Liz out! McLean Packer coach". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 2, part 2.
  14. ^ "Packers to oust Blackbourn today". Milwaukee Sentinel. January 6, 1958. p. 2, part 2.
  15. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on May 16, 2006. Retrieved 2006-05-16.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  16. ^ College Football Reference Archived July 24, 2011, at the Wayback Machine Marquette University Football Records
  17. ^ "Save football, alumni aim". Milwaukee Journal. December 10, 1960. p. 14.
  18. ^ "Marquette drops football, track". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. Associated Press. December 10, 1960. p. 10.
  19. ^ Bolchat, Rel (December 10, 1960). "MU drops football, basketball survives". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 3, part 2.
  20. ^ Riordon, Robert J (December 10, 1960). "'We want football!' MUers yell". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 1, part 1.
  21. ^ a b "Lisle Blackbourn dies at 84; coached Green Bay Packers". New York Times. Associated Press. June 15, 1983. Retrieved March 19, 2014.

External links

1946 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1946 Wisconsin Badgers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1946 Big Nine Conference football season. The team compiled a 4–5 record (2–5 against conference opponents) and finished in eighth place in the Big Nine Conference. Harry Stuhldreher was in his 11th year as Wisconsin's head coach. The team averaged 253.1 yards per game of total offense, 179.8 by rushing, and 73.3 by passing.The team's statistical leaders included Earl Maves with 538 rushing yards, Lisle Blackbourn, Jr., with 175 passing yards, Tom Bennett with 124 receiving yards, and Ben Bendrick with 30 points scored. Center Fred Negus received the team's most valuable player award. T. A. Cox led the Big Nine with an average of 43.0 yards per punt. Clarence Esser was the team captain.Earl Maves rushed for 155 yards against Marquette on September 21, 1946. In the same game, he set a Wisconsin school record with an 86-yard touchdown run. That record stood until 1957. Also in the Marquette game, Gene Evans set a school record with three interceptions, a record that stood until 1954. The defense held Marquette to five rushing yards in the game.On September 28, 1946, Wisconsin set a school record by holding California to 71 yards (24 rushing, 47 passing). That record stood until 2005.The team played its home games at Camp Randall Stadium. During the 1946 season, the average attendance at home games was 45,000.

1947 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1947 Wisconsin Badgers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1947 Big Nine Conference football season. The team compiled a 5–3–1 record (3–2–1 against conference opponents) and finished in second place in the Big Nine Conference. Harry Stuhldreher was in his 12th year as Wisconsin's head coach. The team was ranked No. 9 in the AP Poll before losing to Michigan on November 15, 1947. The team averaged 280.1 yards per game of total offense, 205.9 yards per game by rushing, and 74.2 by passing.The team's statistical leaders included Clarence Self with 526 rushing yards, Jug Girard with 322 passing yards, Tom Bennett with 95 receiving yards, and Lisle Blackbourn, Jr., with 39 points scored. Center Red Wilson received the team's most valuable player award; Wilson also received first-team honors from the Associated Press, United Press, and International News Service on the 1947 All-Big Nine Conference football team. Jack Wink was the team captain.Several Wisconsin records were set during the 1947 season, including the following:

In a game against Iowa on November 8, 1947, Jug Girard set four Iowa single game records: 158 punt return yards; two punt returns for touchdowns, an 85-yard return; and an average of 52.7 yards per return. Three of those record still stand (the record for longest punt return was broken in 1970).

In a game against Purdue on September 27, 1947, Clarence Self set Iowa's single game record with an average of 12.7 yards per carry (10 carries for 127 yards). That record stood for 26 years.

In a game against Michigan on November 15, 1947, Clarence Self set Iowa's single game record with 178 kickoff return yards. That record stood for 60 years.The team played its home games at Camp Randall Stadium. During the 1947 season, the average attendance at home games was 44,200.

1954 Green Bay Packers season

The 1954 Green Bay Packers season was their 36th season overall and their 34th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 4–8 record under new head coach Lisle Blackbourn and finished fifth in the Western Conference.

In a season of streaks, the Packers lost their first three games, all at home, climbed back to .500 at 4–4, then lost their final four.

1955 Green Bay Packers season

The 1955 Green Bay Packers season was their 37th season overall and their 35th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–6 record under coach Lisle Blackbourn, earning them a third-place finish in the Western Conference.

1956 Green Bay Packers season

The 1956 Green Bay Packers season was their 38th season overall and their 36th in the National Football League. The club posted a 4–8 record under coach Lisle Blackbourn, earning them a fifth-place finish in the Western Conference.

1957 Green Bay Packers season

The 1957 Green Bay Packers season was their 39th season overall and their 37th season in the National Football League. After an opening win, the club posted a 3–9 record under fourth-year head coach Lisle Blackbourn and finished last in the Western Conference. It was Blackbourn's final season at Green Bay, who was replaced by Ray McLean in January 1958 for just one year, succeeded by Vince Lombardi in 1959.

The 1957 season also marked the Packers' move from City Stadium to new City Stadium, which was opened with a win over the Chicago Bears in week one on September 29. It was renamed Lambeau Field in August 1965 in memory of Packers founder, player, and long-time head coach, Curly Lambeau, who had died two months earlier.

1958 Green Bay Packers season

The 1958 Green Bay Packers season was their 40th season overall and their 38th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 1–10–1 record under first-year head coach Ray McLean for a last-place finish in the league in 1958 and the worst record ever posted by a Packers team.

In the immortal words of New York sportswriter and Green Bay native Red Smith: "they overwhelmed one opponent, under-whelmed ten, and whelmed one." The tie came in week two and the three-point win in week five; during the seven-game losing streak to end the season the Packers lost by an average margin of over 22 points and got no closer than ten. The Packers finished 1958 allowing a league-worst 382 points in the 12-game season (31.8 points per game).

McLean was the top assistant on the coaching staff in 1957 and was given a one-year contract as head coach after Lisle Blackbourn was fired in early January 1958 with a year remaining ($25,000) on a five-year contract. Following the final game of the 1958 season, McLean resigned on December 17, which paved the way for the historic hiring of Vince Lombardi in January 1959.The underachieving 1958 team was loaded with talent, with future hall of famers Bart Starr, Paul Hornung, Jim Taylor, Ray Nitschke, Jim Ringo, Forrest Gregg, and Jerry Kramer, as well as future All-Pros Ron Kramer, Max McGee, Bill Forester, and Dan Currie.

Blackbourn

Blackbourn is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

David Blackbourn (born 1949), British historian

Elizabeth Blackbourn, English table tennis player

Lisle Blackbourn (1899–1983), American football coach

Robert Blackbourn (died 1748), English Jacobite

Cody Clark

Floyd Milton "Cody" Clark (August 13, 1882 – November 14, 1931) was an American football coach. Clark was the sixth head football coach at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and he held that position for the 1907 season.

His coaching record at Marquette was 6–0.Clark died at a hospital in Alliance, Nebraska after a long illness in 1931.

F. L. Ferzacca

Faust L. "Frosty" Ferzacca (January 29, 1908 – August 13, 2004) was an American football coach and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Marquette University from 1954 to 1955 and at Northern Michigan University from 1957 to 1965, compiling a career college football record of 58–36–4. He then worked as the athletic director at Eastern Michigan University from 1966 to 1973 and at Florida International University from 1974 to 1975 before serving as the commissioner of the Mid-Continent Conference—now known as the Summit League—from 1982 to 1988.

Frank Murray

Frank J. Murray (February 12, 1885 – September 12, 1951) was an American football and basketball coach. He served as the head football coach at Marquette University from 1922 to 1936 and again from 1946 to 1949, and at the University of Virginia from 1937 to 1945, compiling a career college football record of 145–89–1. Murray was also the head basketball coach at Marquette from 1920 to 1929, tallying a mark of 94–73. Murray was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1983.

Jerry Riordan

Jeremiah P. "Jerry" Riordan (February 17, 1873 – January 20, 1936) was an American football player and coach.

Riordan was born in Trenton, Wisconsin and attended school in West Bend. Riordan was the third head football at Marquette University and he held that position for two seasons, in 1901 and 1903.He died of an "attack of heart disease" at St. Paul, Minnesota in 1936. He was buried at Madison, Wisconsin.

John F. Druze

John Francis Druze (July 3, 1914 – December 27, 2005) was an American football player and coach.

John Ford (American football coach)

John Ford was an American football coach. He served as the fifth head football coach at Marquette University during the 1905 and 1906 seasons. His coaching record at Marquette was 4–8–2. This ranks him 13th at Marquette in total wins and 15th at Marquette in winning percentage (.393). Having been a graduate of the College of the Holy Cross (where he played football), Ford was also the first paid coach at Marquette.

Leander J. Foley

Leander J. "Lee" Foley was an American football player and coach. Foley was the ninth head football coach at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and he held that position for the 1913 season. His coaching record at Marquette was 4–3–1. Foley later became an obstetrician and gynecologist in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin.

List of Green Bay Packers head coaches

There have been 15 head coaches for the Green Bay Packers, a professional American football team of the National Football League (NFL). The franchise was founded in 1919 by Curly Lambeau and competed for two years against teams around Wisconsin and Michigan before entering into the American Professional Football Association, which is now known as the NFL.

Four different coaches have won NFL championships with the Packers: Earl Louis "Curly" Lambeau in 1929, 1930, 1931, 1936, 1939, and 1944; Vince Lombardi in 1961, 1962, 1965, 1966, and 1967; Mike Holmgren in 1996; and Mike McCarthy in 2010. Lambeau is the franchise leader in career games (334) and career wins (209), while Lombardi has the best winning percentage (.754). Ray (Scooter) McLean has the worst winning percentage (.077). Four Packers coaches—Lambeau, Lombardi, Bart Starr and Forrest Gregg—have been elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, although Starr and Gregg are recognized as players. Lombardi and Lindy Infante have both been named the league's coach of the year by major news organizations.

As of January 2019, the head coach of the Green Bay Packers is Matt LaFleur, who was named to that position after Mike McCarthy was fired during the 2018 NFL season.

Oscar Erickson (American football)

Oscar Erickson was an American football coach. Erickson was the second head football coach at Marquette University located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and he held that position for the 1902 season. His coaching record at Marquette was 6–1–1.

Thomas E. Stidham

Thomas E. Stidham (March 25, 1905 – January 29, 1964) was an American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at the University of Oklahoma from 1937 to 1940 and Marquette University from 1941 to 1945, compiling a career record of 47–30–5.

Thomas Skelly

Thomas J. Skelly was an American football coach. Skelly was the fourth head football coach at Marquette University located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and he held that position for the 1904 season. His coaching record at Marquette was 5–2.Skelly, a native of Norwich, Connecticut, was a graduate of The College of the Holy Cross. There he played football, basketball and baseball, the latter with the position of right fielder, for three years. In the 1903 football season, he had also served as the team's captain.

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