Lieutenant colonel

Lieutenant colonel (pronounced Lef-ten-ent Kernel (UK & Commonwealth) or Loo-ten-ent Kernel (US)) is a rank of commissioned officer in the armies, most marine forces and some air forces of the world, above a major and below a colonel. The rank of lieutenant colonel is often shortened to simply "colonel" in conversation and in unofficial correspondence. Sometimes, the term 'half-colonel' is used in casual conversation in the British Army.[1] A lieutenant colonel is typically in charge of a battalion or regiment in the army.

Lieutenant colonel ranks by country

The following articles deal with the rank of lieutenant colonel (or its equivalent)

Lieutenant colonel equivalents

  • Azerbaijan - Polkovnik leytenant
  • Afghanistan — Dagarman (دګرمن)
  • Arab worldMoqaddam (مقدم)
  • Albania — Nënkolonel
  • Argentina - Teniente Coronel
  • Armenia — Pokhgndapet (փոխգնդապետ)
  • Austria — Oberstleutnant
  • Belgium — Lieutenant-colonel (French language), Luitenant-kolonel (Dutch language)
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina — Potpukovnik
  • Brazil — Tenente-coronel
  • Chile — Teniente Coronel
  • Bulgaria — Podpolkovnik
  • Cambodia — Lok Vorsenito (លោកវរសេនីយ៍ទោ)
  • Colombia — Teniente Coronel
  • Croatia - Podpukovnik
  • Czech Republic — Podplukovník
  • People's Republic of China — 中校 (Zhōng xiào)
  • Republic of China (Taiwan) — 中校 (Zhōng xiào)
  • Denmark — Oberstløjtnant
  • Estonia — Kolonelleitnant
  • Ethiopia — Lieutenant koronel
  • Finland — Everstiluutnantti, Överstelöjtnant
  • France — Lieutenant-colonel
  • Germany — Oberstleutnant
  • Georgia — Vice-colonel (vitse-polkovniki)
  • Greece — Antisyntagmatarkhis
  • Honduras — Teniente Coronel
  • Hungary — Alezredes
  • Indonesia — Letnan kolonel (abbreviated Letkol)[a]
  • Iran — Sarhang dovom (سرهنگ دوم)
  • Israel — Sgan aluf (סגן-אלוף / סא״ל)
  • Italy — Tenente colonnello
  • Japan — Ni sa (二佐)
  • North Korea — Jungjwa (중좌)
  • South Korea — Jungryung (중령)
  • Latvia — Pulkvežleitnants
  • Lithuania — Pulkininkas leitenantas
  • Macedonia - Потполковник (Potpolkovnik)
  • Malaysia - Leftenan-Kolonel
  • Malta — Logotenent kurunell
  • Mongolia — Дэд Хурандаа (Ded Khurandaa)
  • Netherlands — Luitenant-kolonel
  • Norway — Oberstløytnant
  • Pakistan - Lieutenant Colonel
  • Philippines — Kalakan (Tagalog), Teniente Coronel (Spanish)
  • Poland — Podpułkownik
  • Portugal — Tenente-coronel
  • Romania — Locotenent colonel
  • Russia — Podpolkovnik
  • Serbia — Potpukovnik
  • Slovakia — Podplukovník
  • Slovenia — Podpolkovnik
  • Somalia — Gaashaanle Dhexe
  • South Africa — Commandant/kommandant (1950–1994); Lieutenant-colonel or Luitenant-kolonel (Afrikaans language: pre-1950 and post-1994)
  • Spain and some Spanish speaking countriesTeniente coronel
  • Sweden — Överstelöjtnant
  • Switzerland — Oberstleutnant (German language), Lieutenant-colonel (French language)
  • Thailand — พันโท
  • Turkey — Yarbay
  • Ukraine — Pidpolkovnyk
  • Vietnam — Trung Tá

Gallery

Army-BEL-OF-04

Belgian Army
(Lieutenant Colonel)

Tenente-Coronel-V

Brazilian Army
(Tenente Coronel)

British Army
(Lieutenant Colonel)

Cdn-Army-LtCol(OF-4)-2014 - Copy

Canadian Army
(Lieutenant Colonel)

French Army
(Lieutenant Colonel)

DH261-Oberstleutnant

German Army
(Oberstleutnant)

Italian Army
Tenente colonnello

17 - Tenente-coronel

Portuguese Army
(Tenente Coronel)

13-Serbian Army-LTC

Serbian Army
(Potpukovnik)

Spanish Army
(Teniente Coronel)

US-O5 insignia

United States Army
(Lieutenant Colonel)

See also

Notes

  1. ^ All Indonesian military services share the same rank name and insignia – i.e. two gold jasmine buds. A lieutenant colonel in the Army usually has a billet as battalion commander, regiment / brigade chief of staff, headquarters staff, department head, or commander of any unit that has the same level as battalion. In the Navy, the common billet is ship's commanding officer, squadron commander, shore department head or staff position. In the Air Force, it has the billet of squadron commander of battalion commander of Air Force Special Force's Corps. In the Marine Corps, usual billet is infantry battalion commander or infantry brigade's chief of staff, although it can command an artillery or cavalry regiment.

References

  1. ^ LTC Keith E. Bonn, Army Officer's Guide, 50th Edition, p. 14. Mechanicsville, Pa.: Stackpole Books, 2005.
  2. ^ British Army website Archived September 15, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
1831 Coronation Honours

The 1831 Coronation Honours were appointments by King William IV to various orders and honours on the occasion of his coronation on 8 September 1831. The honours were published in The London Gazette on 16 September and 27 September 1831.The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged by honour, with classes (Knight, Knight Commander, etc.) and then divisions as appropriate.

1838 Coronation Honours

The 1838 Coronation Honours were appointments by Queen Victoria to various orders and honours on the occasion of her coronation on 28 June 1838. The honours were published in The London Gazette on 20 July and 24 July 1838.The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged by honour, with classes (Knight, Knight Grand Cross, etc.) and then divisions (Military, Civil, etc.) as appropriate.

1881 Birthday Honours

The 1881 Birthday Honours were appointments by Queen Victoria to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of the British Empire. The appointments were made to celebrate the official birthday of the Queen, and were published in The London Gazette on 24 May 1881.The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged by honour, with classes (Knight, Knight Grand Cross, etc.) and then divisions (Military, Civil, etc.) as appropriate.

1887 Golden Jubilee Honours

The Golden Jubilee Honours for the British Empire were announced on 21 June 1887 to celebrate the Golden Jubilee of Queen Victoria on 20 June 1887.The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged by honour, with classes (Knight, Knight Grand Cross, etc.) and then divisions (Military, Civil, etc.) as appropriate.

1897 Diamond Jubilee Honours

The Diamond Jubilee Honours for the British Empire were announced on 22 June 1897 to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria on 20 June 1897.The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged by honour, with classes (Knight Grand Cross, etc.) and then divisions (Military, Civil, etc.) as appropriate.

1902 Coronation Honours

The 1902 Coronation Honours were announced on 26 June 1902, the date originally set for the coronation of King Edward VII. The coronation was postponed because the King had been taken ill two days before, but he ordered that the honours list should be published on that day anyway.

The list included appointments to various orders and honours of the United Kingdom and British India, and the creation of two new decorations:

the Order of Merit

the Imperial Service OrderThere were also some promotions and appointments in the British Army announced in the list.

The honours were covered in the press at the time, including in The Times on the day, but formal announcements in the London Gazette were spread out over the following months, in gazettes dated 26 June 1902, 11 July 1902, 18 July 1902, 22 July 1902, 25 July 1902, and 2 September 1902.A South African list, honouring people for their service during the Second Boer War, was published on the same day.

1917 Birthday Honours

The 1917 Birthday Honours were appointments by King George V to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of the British Empire. The appointments were made to celebrate the official birthday of The King, and were published on 4 June.The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged by honour, with classes (Knight, Knight Grand Cross, etc.) and then divisions (Military, Civil, etc.) as appropriate.

1918 Birthday Honours

The 1918 Birthday Honours were appointments by King George V to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of the British Empire. The appointments were made to celebrate the official birthday of The King, and were published in The London Gazette in early June 1918.The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged by honour, with classes (Knight, Knight Grand Cross, etc.) and then divisions (Military, Civil, etc.) as appropriate.

1919 New Year Honours

The 1919 New Year Honours were appointments by King George V to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of the British Empire. The appointments were published in The London Gazette and The Times in January 1919.The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged by honour, with classes (Knight, Knight Grand Cross, etc.) and then divisions (Military, Civil, etc.) as appropriate.

Colonel (United States)

In the United States Army, Marine Corps, and Air Force, colonel () is the most senior field grade military officer rank, immediately above the rank of lieutenant colonel and immediately below the rank of brigadier general. It is equivalent to the naval rank of captain in the other uniformed services. The pay grade for colonel is O-6.

The insignia of the rank of colonel, as seen on the right, is worn on the officer's left side (a mirror-image version is worn on the right side, such that the eagle always faces forward to the wearer's front; the left-side version is also worn centered on fatigue caps, helmets, Army ACU & ECWCS breasts, inter alia). By law, a colonel must have 22 years of service and a minimum of three years of service as a lieutenant colonel before being promoted.

Comparative air force officer ranks of Africa

Rank comparison chart of air forces of African states.

Comparative air force officer ranks of Asia

Rank comparison chart of air forces of Asian states.

Comparative army officer ranks of Africa

Rank comparison chart of armies/ land forces of African states.

Comparative army officer ranks of Asia

Rank comparison chart of armies/ land forces of Asian states.

Note: Since none of the countries on this list are part of NATO, the conversion to equivalent NATO ranks are approximate.

Comparative army officer ranks of the Commonwealth

Rank comparison chart of armies/ land forces of Commonwealth of Nations states.

Lieutenant colonel (United Kingdom)

See Lieutenant colonel for other countries which use this rankLieutenant colonel (Lt Col), is a rank in the British Army and Royal Marines which is also used in many Commonwealth countries. The rank is superior to major, and subordinate to colonel. The comparable Royal Navy rank is commander, and the comparable rank in the Royal Air Force and many Commonwealth air forces is wing commander.

The rank insignia in the British Army and Royal Marines, as well as many Commonwealth countries, is a crown above a 4 pointed "Bath" star, also colloquially referred to as a "pip". The crown has varied in the past with different monarchs; the current one being the Crown of St Edward. Most other Commonwealth countries use the same insignia, or with the state emblem replacing the crown.

In the modern British Armed forces, the established commander of a regiment or battalion is a lieutenant colonel.

From 1 April 1918 to 31 July 1919, the Royal Air Force maintained the rank of lieutenant colonel. It was superseded by the rank of wing commander on the following day.

Lieutenant colonel (United States)

In the United States Army, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Air Force, a lieutenant colonel is a field-grade military officer rank just above the rank of major and just below the rank of colonel. It is equivalent to the naval rank of commander in the other uniformed services.

The pay grade for the rank of lieutenant colonel is O-5. In the United States armed forces, the insignia for the rank consists of a silver oak leaf, with slight stylized differences between the Army/Air Force version and the Navy/Marine Corps version.

Promotion to lieutenant colonel is governed by Department of Defense policies derived from the Defense Officer Personnel Management Act (DOPMA) of 1980 for officers in the Active Component and its companion Reserve Officer Personnel Management Act (ROPMA) for officers in the Reserve Component (e.g., Reserve and National Guard). DOPMA guidelines suggest 70% of majors should be promoted to lieutenant colonel after serving a minimum of three years at their present rank and after attaining 15–17 years of cumulative commissioned service.

Major (United States)

In the United States Army, Marine Corps, and Air Force, major is a field grade military officer rank above the rank of captain and below the rank of lieutenant colonel. It is equivalent to the naval rank of lieutenant commander in the other uniformed services. Although lieutenant commanders are considered junior officers by their respective services, the rank of major is considered field grade in the United States Army and the United States Marine Corps.

The pay grade for the rank of major is O-4. The insignia for the rank consists of a golden oak leaf, with slight stylized differences between the Army/Air Force version and the Marine Corps version. Promotion to major is governed by the Department of Defense policies derived from the Defense Officer Personnel Management Act of 1980.

Ranks in the French Army

See Ranks in the French Navy for more details about the naval ranks

Rank insignia in the French Army are worn on the sleeve or on shoulder marks of uniforms, and range up to the highest rank of Marshal of France, a state honour denoted with a seven-star insignia that was last conferred posthumously on Marie Pierre Koenig in 1984.

Navies Armies Air forces
Commissioned officers
Admiral of
the fleet
Field marshal or
General of the army
Marshal of
the air force
Admiral General Air chief marshal
Vice admiral Lieutenant general Air marshal
Rear admiral Major general Air vice-marshal
Commodore Brigadier or
brigadier general
Air commodore
Captain Colonel Group captain
Commander Lieutenant colonel Wing commander
Lieutenant
commander
Major or
commandant
Squadron leader
Lieutenant Captain Flight lieutenant
Lieutenant
junior grade
or
sub-lieutenant
Lieutenant or
first lieutenant
Flying officer
Ensign or
midshipman
Second lieutenant Pilot officer
Officer cadet Officer cadet Flight cadet
Enlisted grades
Warrant officer or
chief petty officer
Warrant officer or
sergeant major
Warrant officer
Petty officer Sergeant Flight sergeant
Leading seaman Corporal or
bombardier
Corporal
Seaman Private or
gunner or
trooper
Aircraftman or
airman
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