Lieutenant (junior grade)

Lieutenant (junior grade), commonly abbreviated as LTJG or, historically, Lt. (j.g.) (as well as variants of both abbreviations), is a junior commissioned officer rank of the United States Navy, the United States Coast Guard, the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps (NOAA Corps). LTJG has a US military pay grade of O-2,[1][2] and a NATO rank code of OF-1a. The rank is also used in the United States Maritime Service. The NOAA Corps's predecessors, the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps (1917–1965) and the Environmental Science Services Administration Corps or ESSA Corps (1965–1970), also used the rank.

Lieutenant, junior grade, ranks above ensign and below lieutenant and is equivalent to a first lieutenant in the other uniformed services (the Army, Marine Corps and Air Force) and sub-lieutenant in the Royal Navy and the navies of many Commonwealth countries.

Promotion to LTJG is governed by Department of Defense policies derived from the Defense Officer Personnel Management Act of 1980. DOPMA guidelines suggest all "fully qualified" ensigns should be promoted to LTJG. The time for promotion to LTJG is a minimum of two years after commissioning in the Navy or 18 months in the Coast Guard. Lieutenants, junior grade typically lead petty officers and non-rated personnel, unless assigned to small aircraft or on staff duty. A LTJG's usual shipboard billet is as a division officer.

Lieutenant, junior grade is often referred to colloquially as JG. Prior to March 3, 1883, this rank was known in the U.S. Navy as master.[3]

US Navy O2 insignia

A U.S. Navy LTJG's insignia.

USCG O-2 insignia

A U.S. Coast Guard LTJG's insignia.

US NOAA O2 insignia

A U.S. NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps LTJG's insignia.

US PHS O2 insignia

A U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps LTJG's (Assistant) insignia.

Female officer saluting
A U.S. Navy lieutenant junior grade.
U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps and U.S. PHS (Assistant) insignia of the rank of Lieutenant (junior grade). Style and method of wear may vary between the services.

Notable LTJGs

Fictional LTJGs

See also

References

  1. ^ 10 USC 5501. Navy: grades above chief warrant officer, W–5
  2. ^ 37 USC 201. Pay grades: assignment to; general rules
  3. ^ Mallory, John A. (1914). Compiled Statutes of the United States 1913. 1. St. Paul: Wast Publishing Company. p. 1062.
  4. ^ "U.S. Navy history of LTJG George H. W. Bush".
  5. ^ "G.I. Jobs -April 2008". Archived from the original on 2006-03-10.
Chitose-class aircraft carrier

The Chitose-class aircraft carriers (千歳型航空母艦, Chitose-gata kōkūbokan) were a class of two seaplane tenders, later converted to light aircraft carriers, of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II. Under the terms of the Washington Naval Treaty, the total tonnage of Japan's naval vessels was limited by class. The Chitose-class ships were built as seaplane tenders, designed to make the conversion to aircraft carriers relatively easy. They served as seaplane tenders during the early part of the Pacific War. After the Battle of Midway, they were converted into light aircraft carriers. Both ships participated in the Battle of the Philippine Sea and both were sunk in the Battle of Leyte Gulf.

Chitose (千歳) underwent conversion at the Sasebo Naval Yard and was completed in New Years Day, 1944. Her sister ship Chiyoda (千代田) was completed approximately two months earlier at the Yokosuka Naval Yard. Both ships were outfitted with a single hangar and they were widened by an additional 6 feet 7 inches (2.0 m). The added flight deck was serviced by two lifts.

Chitose and Chiyoda were sunk at the Battle of Cape Engano, which occurred during the Imperial Japanese Navy's "Sho-Go" operation that produced the Battle of Leyte Gulf. In charge of the operation was Vice Admiral Jisaburo Ozawa, commander of the operation's northern force. Ozawa's was a desperate mission—provide an attractive target for U.S. Admiral William F. Halsey's Third Fleet, hopefully pulling the powerful American "fast carriers" north so that Japanese surface ships could slip in and attack U.S. invasion forces off Leyte. His ships were not expected to survive their diversionary employment. Together with two other carriers in the group, they carried only 116 planes, much less than their normal capacity and far less than the aircraft of Halsey's task forces.

Despite their role as "bait", the Japanese carriers sighted Halsey first and launched a strike in the late morning of 24 October. This accomplished nothing, and only a few planes returned to the carriers, leaving them with less than thirty. The Japanese ships tried hard to be conspicuous, and U.S. aircraft finally spotted them in mid-afternoon. Admiral Halsey, believing that his aviators had driven the other Japanese forces away, headed north to attack.

At about 08:00 on the morning of 25 October, American carrier planes began a series of attacks and sank Chitose. A second strike came in around 10:00 that damaged Chiyoda and slowed her down. She was later sunk by gunfire from four cruisers and nine destroyers under the command of Rear Admiral DuBose that had been detached from Halsey's Third Fleet to sail north and engage the Japanese.

(From a Presidential Citation-May 1945) Lieutenant, Junior Grade Donald McCutcheon U.S. Navy (Reserve), from Elisabeth, NJ received the Navy Cross for extraordinary heroism in operations against the enemy while serving as Pilot of a carrier- based Navy Dive Bomber in Bombing Squadron Fifteen (VB-15), embarked from the U.S.S. Essex (CV-9). Fearlessly pressing home his attack to low altitude in the face of accurate and intense antiaircraft fire from the formidable enemy disposition, Lieutenant, Junior

Grade, McCutcheon succeeded in scoring a direct hit upon a Japanese aircraft carrier of Chitose class, causing certain damage to that enemy vessel. Undaunted in the face of relentless, devastating antiaircraft fire, he rendered gallant service during the bitterly fought engagement in which all carriers, a light cruiser and a destroyer of the enemy's task force were sunk and heavy bomb and torpedo damage inflicted on battleships and other important naval units. By his daring airmanship, exceptional courage and steadfast devotion to duty through a perilous assignment, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, McCutcheon contributed materially to the sinking of this valuable enemy fighting unit and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Comparative navy officer ranks of Africa

Rank comparison chart of navies of African states.

Comparative navy officer ranks of Asia

Rank comparison chart of navies of Asian states.

Note: Since none of the countries on this list are part of NATO, the conversion to equivalent NATO ranks are approximate.

Comparative navy officer ranks of the Americas

Rank comparison chart of navies of North and South American states.

Comparative navy officer ranks of the Commonwealth

Rank comparison chart of naval forces of Commonwealth of Nations states.

Most of the 52 commonwealth nations have their beginnings in British Empire and have shared naval traditions. By comparison Mozambique is a former Portuguese colony. Even after some had achieved a degree of independent government from the UK, their naval protection was still British; the Royal New Zealand Navy did not exist separately until 1941.

Junior officer

Junior officer, company officer or company grade officer refers to the lowest operational commissioned officer category of ranks in a military or paramilitary organization, ranking above non-commissioned officers and below senior officers.

The terms company officer or company-grade officer are used more in the Army, Air Force, or Marine Corps as the ranks of captain, lieutenant grades and other subaltern ranks originated from the officers in command of a company or equivalent (cavalry squadron/troop and artillery battery).In many armed forces, a junior officer is specifically a commissioned officer holding rank equivalent to a naval lieutenant, an army captain or a flight lieutenant or below.

In the United States Armed Forces, the term junior officer is used by the Navy and the Coast Guard for officers in the ranks of ensign (O-1), lieutenant, junior grade (O-2), and lieutenant (O-3).

The U.S. commissioned officer corps is divided into ten pay grades (O-1 through O-10).

Officers in pay grades O-1 through O-3 are considered company grade officers. In the Army, Marine Corps and Air Force, these pay grades correspond to the ranks of second lieutenant (O-1), first lieutenant (O-2), and captain (O-3), and in the Navy, these pay grades correspond to ensign (O-1), lieutenant (junior grade) (O-2), and lieutenant (O-3).

Officers in pay grades O-4 through O-6 are considered field grade officers. In the Army, Marine Corps, and Air Force, these pay grades correspond to the ranks of major (O-4), lieutenant colonel (O-5), and colonel (O-6), and in the Navy, lieutenant commander, commander, and captain.

The highest four pay grades are reserved for general officers in the Army, Marine Corps and Air Force and flag officers in the Navy. The ranks associated with each pay grade are as follows: in the Army, Marine Corps and Air Force, brigadier general (O-7), major general (O-8), lieutenant general (O-9) and general (O-10); in the Navy, rear admiral (lower half), rear admiral, vice admiral and admiral.

List of World War II aces from Japan

This is a list of fighter aces in World War II from Japan, as officially credited by the Imperial Japanese government. For other countries see List of World War II aces by country.

Star Trek uniforms

Star Trek uniforms are costumes worn by actors portraying personnel from the fictitious organization Starfleet in the Star Trek science fiction franchise. Costume design often changed between various television series and films, especially those representing different time periods, both for appearance and comfort. Deliberately mixing styles of uniforms from the various series was occasionally used to enhance the sense of time travel or alternative universes.

USS Combat (AMc-69)

USS Combat (AMc-69) was an Accentor-class coastal minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the water to prevent ships from passing.

Combat, formerly named Comrade, was launched 6 October 1941 by Hogdon Bros., Goudy, and Stevens, East Boothbay, Maine; sponsored by Miss C. Goudy; and placed in service 24 February 1942, Lieutenant (junior grade) D. A. Mitchell, USNR, in charge.

USS Deede

USS Deede (DE-263) was an Evarts-class destroyer escort in the United States Navy. The ship was named after LeRoy Clifford Deede, LTJG, USNR.

Deede was launched 6 April 1943 by Boston Navy Yard; sponsored by Mrs. M. B. Deede, mother of Lieutenant (junior grade) Deede; and commissioned 29 July 1943, Lieutenant Commander J. W. Whaley in command.

USS Energy (AMc-78)

USS Energy (AMc-78) was an Accentor-class minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the water to prevent ships from passing.

Energy was launched 20 September 1941 by W. A. Robinson, Inc., of Ipswich, Massachusetts; sponsored by Mrs. E. Benedix; and commissioned 1 January 1942, Lieutenant (junior grade) J. L. Maloney, USNR, in command.

USS Eversole (DE-404)

USS Eversole (DE-404) was a John C. Butler-class destroyer escort built for the United States Navy during World War II. Named for Lieutenant (junior grade) John Thomas Eversole, (a naval aviator who was killed in the opening phases of the Battle of Midway), she was the first of two U.S. Naval vessels to bear the name. The vessel was torpedoed and sunk on 28 October 1944.

Eversole was laid down on 15 September 1943 by Brown Shipbuilding of Houston, Texas and launched on 3 December, sponsored by Mrs. Sarah R. Eversole, mother of Lieutenant (junior grade) Eversole. The ship was commissioned on 21 March 1944 with Lieutenant Commander G. E. Marix in command.

USS Fowler (DE-222)

USS Fowler (DE-222), a Buckley-class destroyer escort of the United States Navy, was named in honor of Lieutenant (junior grade) Robert L. Fowler (1919-1942), who was killed in action, while serving aboard the destroyer Duncan (DD-485) during the Battle of Cape Esperance on the night of 11–12 October 1942. He was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross.

Fowler was launched on 3 July 1943 by Philadelphia Navy Yard; sponsored by Mrs. Robert L. Fowler, III, widow of Lieutenant (junior grade) Fowler; and commissioned on 15 March 1944, Lieutenant Commander G. S. Forde, United States Naval Reserve, in command.

USS Fulmar (AMc-46)

USS Fulmar (AMc-46) was an Accentor-class coastal minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the water to prevent ships from passing.

The first ship to be named Fulmar by the Navy, AMC-46 was launched 25 February 1941 by Greenport Basin and Construction Company, Greenport, Long Island, New York; sponsored by Mrs. A. V. Walters; and commissioned 25 June 1941, Lieutenant (junior grade) A. Russell, USNR, in command.

USS Holder (DE-401)

USS Holder (DE-401) was an Edsall-class destroyer escort built for the United States Navy during World War II. Named for Lieutenant (junior grade) Randolph Mitchell Holder (a naval aviator who was reported missing during the Battle of Midway), she was the first of two U.S. Naval vessels to bear the name.

USS Rhodes (DE-384)

USS Rhodes (DE-384) was an Edsall-class destroyer escort built for the United States Navy during World War II. She served in the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean and provided destroyer escort protection against submarine and air attack for Navy vessels and convoys. Post-war she served the Navy as a radar picket ship.

She was named in honor of Lieutenant (junior grade) Allison Phidel Rhodes who was killed in action as USS Atlanta (CL-51) fought her last battle, the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, on 13 November 1942. She was laid down by the Brown Shipbuilding Company at Houston, Texas on 19 April 1943, and was launched 29 June 1943. Her sponsor was Mrs. C. E. Rhodes, mother of Lieutenant (junior grade) Rhodes, and was commissioned on October 1943, Lieutenant Commander E. A. Coffin of the United States Coast Guard in command.

USS Richard W. Suesens

USS Richard W. Suesens (DE-342) was a John C. Butler-class destroyer escort in the United States Navy. It was named after Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Richard Wayne Suesens (30 July 1915 – 5 June 1942) who died during the Battle of Midway and was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for "extraordinary heroism".

Richard W. Suesens's keel was laid down 1 November 1943 by the Consolidated Steel Corporation of Orange, Texas. The destroyer escort was launched on 11 January 1944, sponsored by Mrs. R. W. Suesens, widow of Lieutenant (junior grade) Suesens; and commissioned on 26 April 1944, with Lieutenant Commander Milford McQuilkin in command.

USS Roy O. Hale (DE-336)

USS Roy O. Hale (DE-336) was an Edsall-class destroyer escort built for the U.S. Navy during World War II. She served in the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean and provided destroyer escort protection against submarine and air attack for Navy vessels and convoys. Post-war, she provided radar picket duty services as part of the Distant Early Warning Line.

She was named in honor of lieutenant (junior grade) Roy Orestus Hale, Jr. who earned the Distinguished Flying Cross for his valiant actions during the Battle of the Coral Sea, 7–8 May 1942. She was laid down on 13 September 1943 by the Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas; launched 20 November 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Roy O. Hale, mother of Lieutenant (junior grade) Hale; and commissioned on 3 February 1944, Lt. Comdr. William W. Bowie, USNR, in command.

United States uniformed services commissioned officer and officer candidate ranks
Pay grade / branch of service Officer
candidate
O-1 O-2 O-3 O-4 O-5 O-6 O-7 O-8 O-9 O-10 O-11 Special
grade
Officer Candidate[1] Second lieutenant / Ensign First lieutenant / Lieutenant (junior grade) Captain / Lieutenant[6] Major / Lieutenant commander Lieutenant colonel / Commander Colonel / Captain Brigadier general / Rear admiral (lower half) Major General / Rear admiral[6] Lieutenant general / Vice admiral[6] General / Admiral[6] General of the Air Force / General of the Army / Fleet Admiral General of the Armies / Admiral of the Navy[2]
CDT / OC 2LT 1LT CPT MAJ LTC COL BG MG LTG GEN GA[3] GAS[3]
Midn / Cand 2ndLt 1stLt Capt Maj LtCol Col BGen MajGen LtGen Gen [5] [5]
MIDN / OC ENS LTJG LT LCDR CDR CAPT RDML RADM VADM ADM FADM[3] AN[3]
Cadet / OT / OC 2nd Lt 1st Lt Capt Maj Lt Col Col Brig Gen Maj Gen Lt Gen Gen GAF[3] [5]
CDT / OC ENS LTJG LT LCDR CDR CAPT RDML RADM VADM ADM [5] [5]
[OC] ENS LTJG LT LCDR CDR CAPT RADM RADM VADM ADM [5] [5]
OC ENS LTJG LT LCDR CDR CAPT RDML RADM VADM [4] [5] [5]
United States warrant officer ranks
W-1 W-2 W-3 W-4 W-5
US-Army-WO1.svg
WO1
US-Army-CW2.svg
CW2
US-Army-CW3.svg
CW3
US-Army-CW4.svg
CW4
US-Army-CW5compare.svg
CW5
USMC WO1.svg
WO1
USMC CWO2.svg
CWO2
USMC CWO3.svg
CWO3
USMC CWO4.svg
CWO4
USMC CWO5.svg
CWO5
US Navy WO1 insignia.svg
WO1
US Navy CW2 insignia.svg
CWO2
US Navy CW3 insignia.svg
CWO3
US Navy CW4 insignia.svg
CWO4
US Navy CW5 insignia.svg
CWO5
USAF-WO1.svg
WO1[1]
USAF-CW2.svg
CWO2[1]
USAF-CW3.svg
CWO3[1]
USAF-CW4.svg
CWO4[1]
USAF CW5.png
CWO5[1]
USCG WO1 insignia.svg
WO1[1]
USCG CW2 insignia.svg
CWO2
USCG CW3 insignia.svg
CWO3
USCG CW4 insignia.svg
CWO4
[2]
[2] [2] [2] [2] [3]
[3] [3] [3] [3] [3]

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