Lew Fonseca

Lewis Albert Fonseca (January 21, 1899 – November 26, 1989) was an American first, second baseman and manager in Major League Baseball for the Cincinnati Reds, Philadelphia Phillies, Cleveland Indians, and Chicago White Sox over a 12-year career. While not a power hitter, he hit for average and was a good contact hitter for most of his career. He topped the .300 mark six times, with his best season coming in 1929 with the Indians, when he hit .369 to win the American League batting title, after coming off a 1928 season in which he broke his leg. His success was short-lived, however, as he broke his arm in 1930, and a torn ligament in his leg prematurely ended his playing career.

In a 12-year major league career, Fonseca posted a .316 batting average (1075-3404), scoring 518 runs, hitting 31 home runs, and compiling 485 RBI in 937 games played. His on-base percentage was .355 and slugging percentage was .432. His career fielding percentage was .983.

Fonseca is perhaps best known as one of the first men to use film in analyzing baseball games and finding flaws in players. It is said that his interest with cameras began while shooting Slide, Kelly, Slide in 1927. As manager of the Chicago White Sox, he used film extensively. After retiring from playing the game, he was director of promotions for both leagues. Fonseca worked on World Series highlight films from their inception in 1943 through 1969, as an editor and director, and narrated the World Series films from 1949-'53 and 1955-'58 (Jack Brickhouse narrated the 1954 World Series film.) Television sportscaster Bob Costas wrote of Fonseca's narration: "[his] vocal stylings were somewhat less than mellifluous, but still endlessly entertaining." Fonseca was batting coach for the Chicago Cubs for many years, until quite late in life. His daughter Carolynn was a talented actress who worked mostly out of Rome, Italy.[1]

Fonseca died in Ely, Iowa at age 90, one month after the Loma Prieta earthquake hit near his birthplace of Oakland, California.

Lew Fonseca
Lew fonseca
First baseman / Second baseman / Manager
Born: January 21, 1899
Oakland, California
Died: November 26, 1989 (aged 90)
Ely, Iowa
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 13, 1921, for the Cincinnati Reds
Last MLB appearance
September 11, 1933, for the Chicago White Sox
MLB statistics
Batting average.316
Home runs31
Runs batted in485
Managerial record120–196
Winning %.380
Teams
As player

As manager

Career highlights and awards

See also

References

  1. ^ Heldenfels, Rich (2009-11-04). "New DVDs tell the story of fall classic: 20-DVD set catalogs 70 years of the Series". Akron Beacon Journal. Archived from the original on June 15, 2011. Retrieved 2009-12-09.

External links

1925 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1925 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished seventh in the National League with a record of 68 wins and 85 losses.

1927 Cleveland Indians season

The 1927 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the American League with a record of 66–87, 43½ games behind the New York Yankees.

1928 Cleveland Indians season

The 1928 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the American League with a record of 62–92, 39 games behind the New York Yankees.

1929 Cleveland Indians season

The 1929 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 81–71, 24 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1929 Major League Baseball season

The 1929 Major League Baseball season.

1930 Cleveland Indians season

The 1930 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record of 81–73, 21 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1931 Chicago White Sox season

The 1931 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 31st season in the major leagues, and its 32nd season overall. They finished with a record 56–97, good enough for 8th place in the American League, 51.5 games behind the first place Philadelphia Athletics.

1931 Cleveland Indians season

The 1931 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record 78–76, 30 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1932 Chicago White Sox season

The 1932 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 32nd season in the major leagues, and their 33rd season overall. They finished with a record 49–102, good enough for seventh place in the American League, 56.5 games behind the first place New York Yankees. The 1932 season was their worst ever (by winning percentage).

1932 Major League Baseball season

The 1932 Major League Baseball season.

1933 Chicago White Sox season

The 1933 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 33rd season in the major leagues, and its 34th season overall. They finished with a record 67–83, good enough for 6th place in the American League, 31 games behind the first place Washington Senators.

1933 Major League Baseball season

The 1933 Major League Baseball season featured ballplayers hitting eight cycles, tied for the most of any single major league season; all eight cycles in each of those seasons were hit by different players.

1934 Chicago White Sox season

The 1934 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 34th season in the major leagues and its 35th season overall. They finished with a record 53–99, good enough for eighth and last place in the American League (47 games behind the first place Detroit Tigers).

1934 Major League Baseball season

The 1934 Major League Baseball season.

1940 Chicago Cubs season

The 1940 Chicago Cubs season was the 69th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 65th in the National League and the 25th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished fifth in the National League with a record of 75–79.

1960 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to Baseball Hall of Fame for 1960 followed a system established after the 1956 election. The Veterans Committee was meeting only in odd-numbered years (until 1962). The Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and, same as in 1958, it elected no one. For the third and final time the induction ceremonies in Cooperstown were canceled because there was no one to induct. It was also the last time until 2013 that there were no living inductees (all three members of that induction class, all deceased, were voted in by the Veterans Committee).

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (E–F)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 32 have had surnames beginning with the letter E, and 79 beginning with the letter F. Three of those players have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame: second baseman Johnny Evers, who played for the Phillies during the 1917 season; right fielder Elmer Flick, who played four seasons for Philadelphia; and first baseman Jimmie Foxx, who was a Phillie during the 1945 season. Two players, Foxx and Del Ennis, are members of the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame. During his 11-season career with Philadelphia (1946–1956), right fielder Ennis, a member of the 1950 team nicknamed the Whiz Kids, notched 634 extra-base hits and scored 891 runs. Foxx was inducted into the Wall of Fame for his contributions as a member of the Philadelphia Athletics.Among the 59 batters in this list, left fielder Spoke Emery has the highest batting average, at .667; he hit safely two times in three career at-bats with Philadelphia. Other players with an average over .300 include Jim Eisenreich (.324 in four seasons), Flick (.338 in four seasons), Lew Fonseca (.319 in one season), and Ed Freed (.303 in one season). Ennis leads all members of this list in home runs and runs batted in, with 259 and 1,124, respectively. Flick's 29 home runs lead those players whose surnames start with F, although he had nearly twice as many triples (57); and he is followed closely by Pedro Feliz (26 home runs). Flick also leads those batters in runs batted in, with 377 in four years.Of this list's 54 pitchers, six pitchers share the best win–loss record, in terms of winning percentage. Paul Erickson won two games for the Phillies without losing any, and five pitchers sport a 1–0 record: Tom Edens, Sergio Escalona, Paul Fletcher, Dana Fillingim, and Foxx, who pitched in nine games for the Phillies despite being primarily a first baseman. Flaherty owns the lowest earned run average (ERA), having appeared in one game, pitching ​1⁄3 inning and allowing no runs for an ERA of 0.00. Among the pitchers who have allowed runs, the best ERAs belong to Foxx and Steve Fireovid, who each have an average of 1.59 earned runs allowed per game. Scott Eyre's 1.62 earned run average from his two seasons with Philadelphia are the best among the pitchers whose surnames begin with E. Jumbo Elliott (36 wins and 205 strikeouts) and Charlie Ferguson (99 wins and 728 strikeouts) are tops in those categories among their respective lists; the latter is also one of the ten Phillies pitchers who have thrown a no-hitter, doing so on August 29, 1885, the first in franchise history. Chick Fraser also accomplished the feat on September 18, 1903.Two Phillies have made 30% or more of their Phillies appearances as both pitchers and position players. In addition to Flaherty's statistics listed above, Harry Felix batted .135 with two runs batted in as a third baseman while amassing a 4.85 ERA and striking out three as a pitcher.

Roger Peckinpaugh

Roger Thorpe Peckinpaugh (February 5, 1891 – November 17, 1977) was an American professional baseball player shortstop and manager. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1910 through 1927, during which he played for the Cleveland Naps, New York Yankees, Washington Senators and Chicago White Sox.

Nap Lajoie discovered Peckinpaugh as a high school student, and signed him to his first professional contract. Peckinpaugh debuted with the Naps, who traded him to the Yankees in 1913. He managed the Yankees for 20 games in 1914 and was the team captain for the remainder of his time with the club. The Senators acquired Peckinpaugh, where he continued to play until his final season, spent with the White Sox. After his playing career, Peckinpaugh managed the Indians from 1928 through 1933 and in 1941. He was also a minor league baseball manager, and served in the front office of the Indians and Buffalo Bisons from 1942 through 1947.

Peckinpaugh was considered an excellent defensive shortstop and strong leader. When he managed the Yankees, he became the youngest manager in MLB history. He was named American League Most Valuable Player in 1925. He played in the World Series three times: winning the 1924 World Series with the Senators, losing the 1921 World Series with the Yankees, and losing the 1925 World Series with the Senators.

Slide, Kelly, Slide

Slide, Kelly, Slide is a 1927 American comedy film, released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, directed by Edward Sedgwick, and starring William Haines, Sally O'Neil, and Harry Carey.

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