Lew Barnes

Lew Eric Barnes (born December 27, 1962) is a former professional American football wide receiver who played three seasons for the Chicago Bears, the Atlanta Falcons, and the Kansas City Chiefs.

Barnes played college football at the University of Oregon.

Barnes prepped at Lincoln High School in Southeast San Diego.

Lew Barnes
No. 81, 80
Position:Wide receiver
Personal information
Born:December 27, 1962 (age 56)
Long Beach, California
Career information
High school:Lincoln (San Diego, California)
College:Oregon
NFL Draft:1986 / Round: 5 / Pick: 138
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Punt/Kick returns:102
Return yardage:1066
Yards per return:10.4
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

External links

1983 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1983 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1983 college football season.

1983 Oregon State vs. Oregon football game

The 1983 Oregon State vs. Oregon football game was a college football game played on November 19, 1983, at Autzen Stadium in Eugene, Oregon, the 87th playing of the annual Civil War rivalry game. The game ended in a scoreless tie. Since overtime was added to NCAA Division I games in 1996, this game is likely to be the last ever with that distinction.Due to the poor play—including eleven turnovers and four missed field goals—and miserable weather conditions in which it was played, the game is often referred to as the Toilet Bowl.

1984 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1984 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1984 college football season.

1984 Oregon Ducks football team

The 1984 Oregon Ducks football team represented the University of Oregon in the 1984 NCAA Division I-A football season. Playing as a member of the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10), the team was led by head coach Rich Brooks, in his eighth year, and played their home games at Autzen Stadium in Eugene, Oregon. They finished the season with a record of six wins and five losses (6–5 overall, 3–5 in the Pac-10).

1985 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1985 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific 10 Conference teams for the 1985 college football season.

1985 College Football All-America Team

The 1985 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1985. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes five selectors as "official" for the 1985 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA); (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers; and (5) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). Other selectors included Football News (FN), Gannett News Service (GNS), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), Pro Football Weekly, Scripps Howard (SH), and The Sporting News (TSN).

Ten players were unanimously selected as first-team All-Americans by all five official selectors. They are:

Bo Jackson, Auburn running back who rushed for 1,786 yards and won the 1985 Heisman Trophy;

Chuck Long, Iowa quarterback who won the 1985 Davey O'Brien Award and Maxwell Award and placed second in the 1985 Heisman Trophy voting;

Lorenzo White, Michigan State running back who became the first Big Ten Conference player to rush for over 2,000 yards and placed fourth in the 1985 Heisman Trophy voting;

Brian Bosworth, Oklahoma linebacker who won the 1985 Dick Butkus Award;

David Williams, Illinois wide receiver who caught 85 passes for 1,047 yards and finished his college career as the second leading receiver in NCAA history;

Larry Station, Iowa linebacker who led the team in tackles for the fourth straight season with 129;

John Lee, UCLA placekicker who set the NCAA record for highest percentage of extra points and field goals made in a career with 93.3% (116 of 117 PATs, 79 of 92 FGs);

Jim Dombrowski, Virginia offensive tackle;

Leslie O'Neal, Oklahoma defensive end; and

Tim Green, Syracuse defensive end.

1985 Oregon Ducks football team

The 1985 Oregon Ducks football team represented the University of Oregon in the 1985 NCAA Division I-A football season. Playing as a member of the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10), the team was led by head coach Rich Brooks, in his ninth year, and played their home games at Autzen Stadium in Eugene, Oregon. They finished the season with a record of five wins and six losses (5–6 overall, 3–4 in the Pac-10).

1986 Chicago Bears season

The 1986 Chicago Bears season was their 67th regular season and 17th post-season completed in the National Football League. The Bears entered the season looking to repeat as Super Bowl champions, as they had won in 1985. Chicago managed to finish 14–2, one game off of their 1985 record of 15–1, and tied the New York Giants for the league’s best record.

After winning the championship in 1985, the Bears seemed like a dynasty in the making. However, quarterback Jim McMahon showed up to training camp 25 pounds overweight – the product of the post-Super Bowl partying he’d partaken in. Nonetheless, he was once again named as the starter. Injuries, however, derailed his season. McMahon played in only six of the team’s first 12 games.

Aided by a strong offensive line, the Bears were once again led on offense by Walter Payton. Payton remained his usual stellar self, posting his 10th and final 1,000-yard season. With McMahon’s poor play, as well as the equally poor play of backups Mike Tomczak, Steve Fuller and Doug Flutie, Payton was the sole spark on offense, which ranked 13th in the NFL.

As had been the case the year before, the Bears were once again led by their explosive defense. Any shortcomings on the offensive side of the ball were more than made up for on the defensive side. They once again were ranked #1 in the NFL. The Bears’ defense became the third defense in the history of the NFL to lead the league in fewest points allowed and fewest total yards allowed for two consecutive seasons. The Bears’ 187 points allowed is the fewest surrendered by any team in the 1980s (other than the strike-shortened 1982 season) – even fewer than the 198 points the Bears allowed in their historic 1985 season.

However, the Bears were not able to recapture their magic from the season before and were bounced from the playoffs in their first game by the Washington Redskins.

1986 NFL Draft

The 1986 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 29–30, 1986, at the Marriot Marquis in New York City, New York. The league also held a supplemental draft after the regular draft and before the regular season.

The first overall selection, Bo Jackson, had told the Buccaneers prior to the draft that he would refuse to sign with the team. Disputes with team owner Hugh Culverhouse intensified after Jackson was ruled ineligible to play college baseball due to a trip he took with Culverhouse. This angered Jackson, as Culverhouse had assured him that the visit wouldn't cause any NCAA violations. It was said that Jackson, who was having what he called his best year playing baseball in school, made the Buccaneers nervous and that by getting him somehow ruled ineligible to play baseball, he would be forced to focus on football. Prior to the 1987 NFL Draft, the Buccaneers forfeited their rights to Jackson.

1992 Frankfurt Galaxy season

The 1992 Frankfurt Galaxy season was the second season for the team in the World League of American Football (WLAF). The team was led by head coach Jack Elway in his second year, and played its home games at Waldstadion in Frankfurt, Germany. They finished the season in second place of the European Division with a record of three wins and seven losses.

2010 Oregon legislative election

The 2010 elections for the Oregon Legislative Assembly determined the composition of both houses for the 76th Oregon Legislative Assembly. The Republican and Democratic primary elections were on May 18, 2010, and the general election was held on November 2, 2010. Sixteen of the Oregon State Senate's thirty seats were up for election, as were all 60 seats of the Oregon House of Representatives.

In the previous session, the Democrats held supermajorities in both chambers: 18–12 in the Senate and 36–24 in the House. Following the election, Republicans reduced the Democratic majority to 16–14 in the Senate and gained enough seats in the House to make the chamber evenly divided between the parties, 30–30.

2012 Oregon legislative election

The 2012 elections for the Oregon Legislative Assembly determined the composition of both houses for the 77th Oregon Legislative Assembly. The Republican and Democratic primary elections were on May 15, 2012, and the general election was on November 6, 2012. Sixteen of the Oregon State Senate's 30 seats were up for election, as were all 60 seats of the Oregon House of Representatives.

In the Senate, the Democrats kept a 16–14 majority, identical to their advantage in the previous legislative session. In the House, Democrats took a 34–26 majority, up from a 30–30 split in the previous session.

Independent Party of Oregon

The Independent Party of Oregon (IPO) is a political party in the U.S. state of Oregon. With more than 125,000 registrants since its inception in January 2007. IPO is Oregon's third-largest political party, and the first political party other than the Democrats or Republicans, to be recognized by the state of Oregon as a major political party in this state.

Jeff Fisher

Jeffrey Michael "Jeff" Fisher (born February 25, 1958) is a former American football coach and player. He served as a head coach in the National Football League (NFL) for 22 seasons, primarily with the Houston / Tennessee Oilers / Titans franchise. He coached the Titans for 17 seasons and the St Louis / Los Angeles Rams for five seasons.

Fisher became the coach of the Titans towards the end of the 1994 season during their tenure as the Houston Oilers and was the team's first coach when they relocated to Tennessee. He continued to coach the Titans until after the end of the 2010 season when the Titans and Fisher mutually agreed to part ways. Following a season away from football, Fisher was hired as the head coach of the Rams in 2012 and coached the team during their last four years in St. Louis. He remained the head coach of the Rams during the franchise's return to Los Angeles in 2016, but was fired near the end of the season.Fisher's most successful season was in 1999, when he led the Titans to the franchise's first (and only) Super Bowl appearance in XXXIV, which ended in close defeat by the St. Louis Rams for their first Super Bowl title. However, despite compiling a winning record as a head coach, Fisher's career has been noted for an overall lack of success, having only obtained six winning seasons and postseason appearances in over two decades in the NFL. He holds the record for the most regular-season losses by an NFL head coach at 165, tied with Dan Reeves.

Lew (given name)

Lew is the usual shortened form of Lewis or Llywelyn when they are used as first names in English.

It can also be found in Slavic languages as a translation of Latin name Leon, where it may be written as "Lew" or "Lev".

List of Chicago Bears team records

The Chicago Bears are a National Football League (NFL) franchise based in Chicago. This article lists all the individual and team statistical records complied since the franchise's birth in 1920.

List of Oregon Ducks football All-Americans

The Oregon Ducks college football team competes as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), and represents the University of Oregon in the North Division of the Pac-12 Conference (Pac-12). All-America selections are individual player recognitions made after each season when numerous publications release lists of their ideal team. The NCAA recognizes five All-America lists: the Associated Press (AP), American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), Sporting News (SN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WCFF). In order for an honoree to earn a "consensus" selection, he must be selected as first team in three of the five lists recognized by the NCAA, and "unanimous" selections must be selected as first team in all five lists.Since the establishment of the team in 1894, Oregon has had 29 players honored a total of 34 times as First Team All-America for their performance on the field of play. Included in these selections are 8 consensus selections, 2 of which were unanimous selections earned by LaMichael James in the 2010 season and Marcus Mariota in the 2014 season in which he won the Heisman Trophy.

List of Oregon Ducks in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Oregon Ducks football players in the NFL Draft.

Oregon Ducks football statistical leaders

The Oregon Ducks football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Oregon Ducks football program in various categories, including passing rushing receiving total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Ducks represent the University of Oregon in the NCAA's Pac-12 Conference.

Although Oregon began competing in intercollegiate football in 1894, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun around 1940. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1940, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Ducks have played in a bowl game in 14 of the seasons since this decision, allowing players on recent teams an extra game to accumulate statistics. In fact, the Ducks played in 2 bowl games as part of the inaugural College Football Playoff after the 2014 season. Similarly, the Ducks have played in the Pac-12 Championship Game twice in the four years it has existed, giving players in 2011 and 2014 yet another chance to increase their stat totals.

Oregon has run a high-octane, up-tempo spread offense recently, causing the Ducks to shatter offensive records. The Ducks have had over 5,000 yards of total offense 17 times, all since 1997. The Ducks have broken the 6000-yard barrier eight times as a team, all since 2007. The Ducks eclipsed 7,000 yards in 2011 and 2013, and topped 8,000 yards in 2014.Career and single-season lists are updated through the end of the 2017 season.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.