Leslie O'Neal

Leslie Claudis O'Neal (born May 7, 1964) is a former football defensive end who played 13 years in the National Football League (NFL). He spent the majority of his career with the San Diego Chargers before finishing with the St. Louis Rams and Kansas City Chiefs. He was a three-time All-Pro and six-time Pro Bowl selection during his pro career.

O'Neal was a two-time All-American playing college football with the Oklahoma State Cowboys. He joined the Chargers after they selected him in the first round with the eight overall pick in the 1986 NFL draft. He was named NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year, but suffered a major knee injury at the end of his first season. He returned within two years, and finished his career as the Chargers all-time leader in sacks. As of December 7, 2018, he ranked tied for 13th all-time in NFL history in sacks.

Leslie O'Neal
No. 91
Position:Defensive end / Linebacker
Personal information
Born:May 7, 1964 (age 54)
Little Rock, Arkansas
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:281 lb (127 kg)
Career information
High school:Little Rock (AR) Hall
College:Oklahoma State
NFL Draft:1986 / Round: 1 / Pick: 8
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Sacks:132.5
Interceptions:3
Touchdowns:1
Player stats at NFL.com

College career

O'Neal played college football for the Oklahoma State Cowboys, and twice earned All-American honors.[1] He was a Big Eight Defensive Player of the Year, and earned All-Big Eight honors for three consecutive years. He finished his Cowboys career ranked fifth all-time in tackles with 351.[2]

Professional career

O'Neal was chosen in the first round with the eight overall pick in the 1986 NFL draft by the San Diego Chargers. He was named the NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year in 1986 after recording ​12 12 sacks for the season, including a team-record five on November 16 against the Dallas Cowboys. However, his season ended prematurely due to a knee injury that sidelined him for almost two seasons.[1]

He returned during the 1988 season on October 16, and returned to his dominant form the following season, when he again had ​12 12 sacks, and was rewarded with the first of six Pro Bowl selections. O'Neal led the Chargers in sacks every season from 1990 through 1995.[1] In 1992, he led the AFC with a career-high 17 sacks. He played his final four seasons with the St. Louis Rams and Kansas City Chiefs.[1]

He finished his Chargers career as the team's all-time leader in sacks (​105 12). He was named to the Chargers 40th and 50th anniversary teams, and was inducted to the San Diego Chargers Hall of Fame as well as the Oklahoma Sports Hall of Fame in 2014.[1][3] Through the 2013 season, he ranked 10th all-time in the NFL in sacks with (​132 12), tied with Lawrence Taylor when excluding the 9.5 sacks the latter accumulated in his rookie season due to not being an official statistic that time.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Williams, Eric D. (September 2, 2014). "DE O'Neal headed to Chargers Hall of Fame". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on September 3, 2014.
  2. ^ "Leslie O'Neal". oksportshof.org. Archived from the original on September 8, 2014.
  3. ^ Carlson, Jenni (January 16, 2014). "Pro Football Hall of Fame needs to take a good look at former Oklahoma State star Leslie O'Neal". The Oklahoman. Archived from the original on September 8, 2014.

External links

1983 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1983 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1983 NCAA Division I-A football season. The selectors for the 1983 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1984 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1984 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1984 NCAA Division I-A football season. The selectors for the 1984 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1985 College Football All-America Team

The 1985 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1985. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes five selectors as "official" for the 1985 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA); (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers; and (5) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). Other selectors included Football News (FN), Gannett News Service (GNS), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), Pro Football Weekly, Scripps Howard (SH), and The Sporting News (TSN).

Ten players were unanimously selected as first-team All-Americans by all five official selectors. They are:

Bo Jackson, Auburn running back who rushed for 1,786 yards and won the 1985 Heisman Trophy;

Chuck Long, Iowa quarterback who won the 1985 Davey O'Brien Award and Maxwell Award and placed second in the 1985 Heisman Trophy voting;

Lorenzo White, Michigan State running back who became the first Big Ten Conference player to rush for over 2,000 yards and placed fourth in the 1985 Heisman Trophy voting;

Brian Bosworth, Oklahoma linebacker who won the 1985 Dick Butkus Award;

David Williams, Illinois wide receiver who caught 85 passes for 1,047 yards and finished his college career as the second leading receiver in NCAA history;

Larry Station, Iowa linebacker who led the team in tackles for the fourth straight season with 129;

John Lee, UCLA placekicker who set the NCAA record for highest percentage of extra points and field goals made in a career with 93.3% (116 of 117 PATs, 79 of 92 FGs);

Jim Dombrowski, Virginia offensive tackle;

Leslie O'Neal, Oklahoma defensive end; and

Tim Green, Syracuse defensive end.

1986 San Diego Chargers season

The 1986 San Diego Chargers season was the franchise's 17th season in the National Football League (NFL), and its 27th overall. the team failed to improve on their 8–8 record from 1985 Following a stagnant 1–7 start, Head Coach Don Coryell was fired and Al Saunders was named interim Head Coach. After the season, Saunders was named the permanent Head Coach and would hold the position through the end of the 1988 season. Leslie O'Neal was named Defensive Rookie of the Year.

1989 San Diego Chargers season

The 1989 San Diego Chargers season was the franchise's 20th season in the National Football League (NFL), its 30th overall and the first season under head coach Dan Henning's.The team matched on their 6–10 record from 1988.

1990 All-Pro Team

The 1990 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1990. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League.

1990 Pro Bowl

The 1990 Pro Bowl was the NFL's fortieth annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1989 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 4, 1990, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,445. The final score was NFC 27, AFC 21.Bud Carson of the Cleveland Browns led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Los Angeles Rams head coach John Robinson. The referee was Johnny Grier.Jerry Gray of the Los Angeles Rams was named the game's MVP. Players on the winning NFC team received $10,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $5,000.

1992 All-Pro Team

The 1992 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1992. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1992 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008.

1992 San Diego Chargers season

The 1992 San Diego Chargers season was the team's 33rd season, their 32nd in San Diego, and 23rd in the National Football League.

The Chargers began with the team trying to improve on their 4–12 record in 1991. Bobby Ross began his first season as the team's head coach, after having spent the previous five years as a college coach at Georgia Tech. The team made the playoffs for the first time in ten years. The Chargers would lose their first four games of the season, but would rally to an 11–5 finish to the season, clinching the AFC West title, and becoming the first (and to this day, only) NFL team to start 0–4 and still make the playoffs.

1993 San Diego Chargers season

The 1993 San Diego Chargers season was the team's 34th season, their 33rd in San Diego, and 24th in the National Football League.

The 1993 season began with the team trying to improve on their 11–5 record in 1992, however, They failed to do so and missed the playoffs by only one game and ended up with an 8-8 record.

1994 All-Pro Team

The 1994 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1994. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1994 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008.

1995 Pro Bowl

The 1995 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 1994 season. The game was played on February 5, 1995, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final Score was AFC 41, NFC 13. This was the AFC's largest margin of victory since the AFL-NFL merger. Rookie Marshall Faulk of the Indianapolis Colts rushed for a Pro Bowl record 180 yards and was the game's MVP. Chris Warren added 127 yards rushing as the AFC posted records for rushing yards (400) and total yards (552). Both Warren and Faulk broke the Pro Bowl rushing record, formerly held by O.J. Simpson.The coaches were Dallas’ Barry Switzer and Bill Cowher of the Pittsburgh Steelers. The game was viewed by 49,121 at Aloha Stadium. The referee was Larry Nemmers.

1995 San Diego Chargers season

The 1995 San Diego Chargers season was the team's 36th, its 26th in the National Football League (NFL), and its 34th in San Diego.

The season began with the team as reigning AFC champions and trying to improve on their 11–5 record in 1994. After starting 4-7, the Chargers won their final five games to get into the playoffs. It ended in the first round with a loss to the Indianapolis Colts.

That game would mark the last time the Chargers would make the playoffs until the 2004 NFL season.

1996 Pro Bowl

The 1996 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 1995 season. The game was played on February 4, 1996, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final score was NFC 20, AFC 13. Jerry Rice of the San Francisco 49ers was named the game's Most Valuable Player after he had 2 clutch catches, including the final one which won the game. He finished with six catches for 82 yards.

The attendance for the game was 50,034. The coaches were Mike Holmgren of the Green Bay Packers and Ted Marchibroda of the Indianapolis Colts. The referee was Tom White.

Hall High School (Arkansas)

Hall High School is an accredited public high school located in Little Rock, Arkansas, United States. Hall is one of five comprehensive four-year public high schools in the Little Rock School District (LRSD) enrolling students in grades nine through twelve.

List of National Football League career sacks leaders

This is a list of National Football League (NFL) players who have reached the 100-sack milestone.

The NFL began to keep track of sacks in 1982. Sacks before this date are not included in this list.

Oklahoma State Cowboys football statistical leaders

The Oklahoma State Cowboys football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Oklahoma State Cowboys football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Cowboys represent Oklahoma State University–Stillwater in the NCAA's Big 12 Conference.

Although Oklahoma State began competing in intercollegiate football in 1901, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1945. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1945, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

The Cowboys have played in 26 bowl games in their history, with 14 of them coming since 2002. While the NCAA didn't count bowl game statistics until 2002, and most schools follow this policy, Oklahoma State's official records count all bowl game statistics. This means that while the NCAA recognizes Barry Sanders's single-season rushing yards record of 2,628 as the national record, Oklahoma State counts his stats from the 1988 Holiday Bowl as well and recognizes the record as 2,850 yards.These lists are updated through the 2017 season.

San Diego Chargers 40th Anniversary Team

The San Diego Chargers announced their 40th Anniversary Team in 2000 to honor the top players and coaches in the history of the National Football League team. The Chargers began play in 1960 as part of the American Football League. The anniversary team included 31 players and coaches voted on by fans and a media panel. The team became the Los Angeles Chargers after relocating in 2017.

Sean Gilbert

Sean Gilbert (born April 10, 1970) is a former professional American football defensive tackle. He was selected by the Los Angeles Rams as the third overall pick of the 1992 NFL Draft. He played college football at University of Pittsburgh.

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