Les Richter

Leslie Alan Richter (October 26, 1930 – June 12, 2010) was an American football linebacker who played for the Los Angeles Rams of National Football League (NFL). He also served as the head of operations for NASCAR and president of the Riverside International Raceway. Richter was twice a consensus All-American for the California Golden Bears football team of the University of California. With the Rams, he played in eight Pro Bowls. He was inducted to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1982 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2011.

Les Richter
refer to caption
Richter (left) in 1959
No. 67, 48
Position:Linebacker, guard, kicker
Personal information
Born:October 26, 1930
Fresno, California
Died:June 12, 2010 (aged 79)
Riverside, California
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:238 lb (108 kg)
Career information
High school:Fresno (CA)
College:California
NFL Draft:1952 / Round: 1 / Pick: 2
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Fumble recoveries:12
Interceptions:16
Points:193
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Football career

At the University of California, Richter played guard and linebacker for the California Golden Bears football team. He was twice recognized as a consensus All-American and first-team All-Pacific Coast, in 1950 and 1951. He was valedictorian of his graduating class of 1952.[1] After graduation, he served in the Korean War for the U.S. Army for two years.[2] He was a first-round draft choice of the NFL's New York Yanks, the second pick overall, in the 1952 NFL Draft. The Yanks folded before the 1952 season, and the Dallas Texans assumed the rights to Richter. They traded him to the Los Angeles Rams for eleven players,[1] the second largest deal ever made for a single player.

During his nine years with the Rams, Richter did not miss a game, playing through various injuries including a broken cheekbone.[3][2] He scored 193 points, which included a touchdown, 106 extra points, and 29 field goals. On defense, he intercepted 16 passes. His 24 field goals attempted during the 1955 season led the NFL.[4] The Rams struggled during that time, winning six or more games four times in nine seasons.[3] The high mark for the team was in 1955, when it reached the championship game and lost to the Cleveland Browns.[5] Richter was selected to eight straight Pro Bowls, from 1954 to 1961, and was four times recognized as a first-team All-Pro. He played center for his final season, in 1962, taking over for injured starter Art Hunter.[1]

Racing executive and later years

After retiring from football, Richter was involved with auto racing in a variety of positions. He was vice-president of special projects for International Speedway Corporation, chairman of the board for the International Race of Champions, and senior vice president of operations for NASCAR.[5]

Richter died on June 12, 2010, at age 79 of a brain aneurysm.[5] As a lieutenant with the U.S. Army during the Korean War, Richter was buried at Riverside National Cemetery in Riverside, California. At the time of his death, Richter was working at the Auto Club Speedway, owned by a sister company to ISC.

Richter was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1982. In 2011, he was posthumously elected as a senior candidate to the Pro Football Hall of Fame class of 2011 along with former Washington Redskins linebacker Chris Hanburger.[3] The induction class also included Deion Sanders, Richard Dent, Marshall Faulk, Ed Sabol, Shannon Sharpe.

References

  1. ^ a b c Tuttle, Tim (June 17, 2010). "Richter remembered as West Coast 'motorsports pioneer'". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved January 28, 2017.
  2. ^ a b Brandt, Gil (July 31, 2011). "Ten things you didn't know about Les Richter". NFL.com. National Football League. Retrieved January 28, 2017.
  3. ^ a b c Fryer, Jenna (August 3, 2011). "Les Richter makes Hall 50 years after final game". USA Today. Retrieved January 28, 2017.
  4. ^ "Les Richter Stats". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 28, 2017.
  5. ^ a b c Peltz, Jim (June 13, 2010). "Les Richter dies at 79; ex-Ram guided auto racing's growth in Southern California". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 28, 2017.

External links

1950 All-Pacific Coast football team

The 1950 All-Pacific Coast football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific Coast teams for the 1950 college football season.

1950 California Golden Bears football team

The 1950 California Golden Bears football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Berkeley in the Pacific Coast Conference (PCC) during the 1950 college football season. In their fourth year under head coach Pappy Waldorf, the team compiled a 9–1–1 record (5–0–1 against PCC opponents), won the PCC championship, lost to Michigan in the 1951 Rose Bowl, was ranked No. 5 in the final AP Poll, and outscored its opponents by a combined total of 224 to 90.The star of this season was guard and linebacker Les Richter, who years later became the first Golden Bear to be inducted into the NFL hall of fame.

1950 College Football All-America Team

The 1950 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1950. The eight selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1950 season are (1) the All-America Board (AAB), (2) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (3) the Associated Press (AP), (4) the Football Writers Association of America (FW), (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (7) the Sporting News (SN), and (8) the United Press (UP).

Ohio State halfback Vic Janowicz, Army end Dan Foldberg, and Texas guard Bud McFadin were the only three players to be unanimously named first-team All-Americans by all eight official selectors. Janowicz was awarded the 1950 Heisman Trophy.

1951 All-Pacific Coast football team

The 1951 All-Pacific Coast football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific Coast teams for the 1951 college football season.

1951 College Football All-America Team

The 1951 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1951. The eight selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1951 season are (1) the All-American Board (AAB), (2) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA, (3) the Associated Press (AP), (4) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (7) the Sporting News and (8) the United Press (UP).

1951 Rose Bowl

The 1951 Rose Bowl was a college football bowl game played on January 1, 1951. It was the 37th Rose Bowl Game. The Michigan Wolverines, champions of the Big Ten Conference, defeated the California Golden Bears, champions of the Pacific Coast Conference, 14–6. Michigan fullback Don Dufek was named the Rose Bowl Player of the Game. With a record of 9–0–1, the Golden Bears were ranked fourth in the nation.

1957 All-Pro Team

The Associated Press (AP), Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), New York Daily News (NYDN), The Sporting News (SN), and United Press (UP) were among selectors of All-Pro teams comprising players adjudged to be the best at each position in the National Football League (NFL) during the 1957 NFL season. The AP, NEA, NYDN, and UPI selected a first and second team.

1957 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1957 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 20th year with the National Football League and the 12th season in Los Angeles.

1958 All-Pro Team

The Associated Press (AP), Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), New York Daily News (NYDN), The Sporting News (SN), and United Press International (UPI) selected All-Pro teams comprising their selections of the best players at each position in the National Football League (NFL) during the 1958 NFL season.

1960 All-Pro Team

Selectors of All-Pros for the 1960 National Football League season included the Associated Press (AP), United Press International (UPI), New York Daily News (NYDN), Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and The Sporting News (SN).

1997 California 500

The 1997 California 500 presented by NAPA was the inaugural NASCAR Winston Cup Series stock car race held at California Speedway in Fontana, California. The race was the 15th in the 1997 NASCAR Winston Cup Series season. Though Greg Sacks was the fastest qualifier, he had to start 26th due to not being a first day qualifier, and the pole position was instead given to Sacks' teammate, fellow Felix Sabates driver Joe Nemechek, who ran with an average speed of 183.015 miles per hour (294.534 km/h). The inaugural California 500 was won by Jeff Gordon of Hendrick Motorsports, who also led the most laps with 113. A crowd of 85,000 attended the race, the first race in southern California since 1988, when Riverside International Raceway held the Budweiser 400.The national anthem was performed by 20th Century Fox Records recording arists Ambrosia but it was not shown on ABC, NAPA vice president Wayne Wells gave the command for drivers to start their engines, and track executive Les Richter was the grand marshal.

Chris Hanburger

Christian G. Hanburger, Jr. (born August 13, 1941) is a former American football linebacker in the National Football League (NFL) who played his entire fourteen-year career with the Washington Redskins from 1965 to 1978. He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2011.

Dallas Texans (NFL)

The Dallas Texans played in the National Football League (NFL) for one season, 1952, with a record of 1–11. The team is considered one of the worst teams in NFL history, both on (lowest franchise winning percentage) and off the field. The team was based first in Dallas, then Hershey, Pennsylvania, and Akron, Ohio, during its only season. The Texans were the last NFL team to fold. Many players on the 1952 roster went to the new Baltimore Colts franchise in 1953. The American Football League (AFL) had a 1960 charter member named the Dallas Texans (who later became the Kansas City Chiefs), but the AFL Texans have no relationship with the earlier NFL team.

Dick Hoerner

Lester Junior "Dick" Hoerner (July 25, 1922 – December 11, 2010) was an American football player. He played fullback for the University of Iowa in 1942 and 1946 and for the Los Angeles Rams from 1947 to 1951. He helped lead the Rams to three consecutive National Football League championship games from 1949 to 1951, played for the 1951 Los Angeles Rams team that won the 1951 NFL Championship Game, and was selected to play in the inaugural 1951 Pro Bowl. He was the Rams' all-time leading rusher at the end of his playing career with the team. He concluded his professional football career as a member of the Dallas Texans in 1952.

International Race of Champions

International Race of Champions (IROC) was a North American auto racing competition, created by Les Richter, Roger Penske and Mike Phelps, promoted as an equivalent of an American All-Star Game or The Masters. Despite its name, the IROC was primarily associated with North American, oval-racing, NASCAR culture.

Drivers raced identically-prepared stock cars set up by a single team of mechanics in an effort to make the race purely a test of driver ability. It was run with a small field of invited drivers (6–12). It was created and developed in 1972 by David Lockton, the developer of the Ontario Motor Speedway, launched in 1973, with Mark Donohue being the first driver to win the championship in 1974. The cars used that year were Porsche Carrera RSRs. Donohue's win in the fourth and last race of that season was his last win, as he died in a Formula One crash at the Österreichring in practice for the 1975 Austrian Grand Prix. The series was not run in 1981, 1982, or 1983.

In 2007, IROC could not find a sponsor and postponed the first two races at Daytona and Texas. IROC went on hiatus in 2007 hoping to return with a sponsor in 2008, which did not happen. In March 2008, IROC auctioned off its tools, equipment, cars, and memorabilia, and went out of business.

List of defunct NFL franchises' first-round draft picks

The National Football League has held a player draft since 1936. Since 1936 there have been several franchises that have folded. This is a list of those franchises' first round draft picks.

Los Angeles Rams awards

This page details awards won by the Los Angeles Rams American football team. The Rams were formerly based in St. Louis (1995–2015) and Cleveland (1936–1942, 1944–1945), as well as Los Angeles (1946–1994, 2016–present).

Mike Helton

Michael "Mike" Helton (born August 30, 1953) is the vice chairman of the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR). He replaced Bill France, Jr. in November 2000 as the company's 3rd president. He was named Chief Operating Officer of NASCAR in February 1999.

Riverside International Raceway

Riverside International Raceway (sometimes known as Riverside, RIR, or Riverside Raceway) was a motorsports race track and road course in the Moreno Valley area, a suburb just east of Riverside, California. Riverside was a hot, dusty place. It was at times, also a dangerous place, yet it is remembered with affection by drivers and fans alike, as the home of road racing in southern California. It was also considered one of USA's finest tracks. The track was in operation from September 22, 1957, to July 2, 1989, with the last race, The Budweiser 400, won by Rusty Wallace, held in 1988. After that final race, a shortened version of the circuit was kept open for car clubs and special events until 1989.

Lex Richter—awards and honors

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