Lenny Lyles

Lenny Lyles (January 26, 1936 – November 20, 2011) was a professional American football defensive back who played 12 seasons in the National Football League (NFL). He started in Super Bowl III for the Baltimore Colts.[1] The 6-2, 202-pound Lyles was recruited by the University of Louisville in 1954, when he broke the school's color barrier for scholarship athletes. Lyles remains Louisville's all-time scoring leader for a non-kicker with 300 points. After a successful collegiate career, where Lyles was known for his return skills, he was drafted by the Baltimore Colts in the first round of the 1958 NFL Draft. He spent one year with the Colts before joining the 49ers in 1959. After two seasons in San Francisco, Lyles returned to the Colts where he remained until the end of his career in 1969. Lyles finished his professional career with 2,161 return yards and averaged 26.7 yards per return. Lyles spent 27 years as an executive with Brown & Williamson in Louisville.

Lenny Lyles
Born:January 26, 1936
Nashville, Tennessee
Died:November 20, 2011 (aged 75)
Louisville, Kentucky
Career information
Position(s)Cornerback
CollegeLouisville
NFL draft1958 / Round: 1 / Pick 11
Career history
As player
1958, 1961–1969Baltimore Colts
1959–1960San Francisco 49ers
Career highlights and awards

References

  1. ^ "Former University of Louisville star and businessman Lenny Lyles dies | The Courier-Journal". courier-journal.com. 2011-11-21. Retrieved 2011-11-29.
1957 Louisville Cardinals football team

The 1957 Louisville Cardinals football team represented the University of Louisville in the 1957 college football season.

1958 Baltimore Colts season

The 1958 Baltimore Colts season was the sixth season for the team in the National Football League. The Colts finished the 1958 season with a record of 9 wins and 3 losses to win their first Western Conference title. They won their first league title in the NFL championship game, which ended in overtime.

1958 Sun Bowl (January)

The 1958 Sun Bowl was a college football bowl game played between Drake Bulldogs and Louisville Cardinals at Kidd Field in El Paso, Texas.

1961 Baltimore Colts season

The 1961 Baltimore Colts season was the ninth season for the team in the National Football League. The Baltimore Colts finished the National Football League's 1961 season with a record of 8 wins and 6 losses and finished tied for third in the Western Conference with the Chicago Bears. There weren't any tiebreakers until 1967.

1962 Baltimore Colts season

The 1962 Baltimore Colts season was the tenth season for the team in the National Football League. The Baltimore Colts finished the National Football League's 1962 season with a record of 7 wins and 7 losses and finished fourth in the Western Conference.

1963 Baltimore Colts season

The 1963 Baltimore Colts season was the 11th season for the team in the National Football League. The Baltimore Colts finished the National Football League's 1955 season with a record of 8 wins and 6 losses and finished third in the Western Conference.

1964 Baltimore Colts season

The 1964 Baltimore Colts season was the 12th season for the team in the National Football League. The Colts finished the regular season with a record of 12 wins and 2 losses and finished first in the Western Conference. They clinched with three games remaining for the first title since 1959.Baltimore met the Cleveland Browns (10–3–1) of the Eastern Conference in the NFL Championship Game in Cleveland, won by the underdog Browns, 27–0.

1965 Baltimore Colts season

The 1965 Baltimore Colts season was the 13th season for the team in the National Football League. The Baltimore Colts finished the National Football League's 1965 season with a record of 10 wins, 3 losses, and 1 tie, tied for first in the Western Conference with the Green Bay Packers. Although the Packers won both regular season games over the Colts, no tiebreaking system was in place in 1965, and a playoff game was required to determine the Western Conference champion, who would host the Eastern Conference champion Cleveland Browns for the NFL title.

1966 Baltimore Colts season

The 1966 Baltimore Colts season was the 14th season for the team in the National Football League. The Baltimore Colts finished the National Football League's 1966 season with a record of 9 wins and 5 losses and finished second in the Western Conference.

1967 Baltimore Colts season

The 1967 Baltimore Colts season was the 15th season for the team in the National Football League. They finished the regular season with a record of 11 wins, 1 loss, and 2 ties, the same record in the Western Conference's Coastal division with the Los Angeles Rams. However, the Colts lost the tiebreaker based on point differential in head-to-head games and thus did not make the playoffs.

The Colts' official winning percentage of .917 (based on the NFL's non-counting of ties for such purposes prior to 1972) is the best in North American professional sports history for a non-playoff-qualifying team.

1968 Baltimore Colts season

The 1968 Baltimore Colts season was the 16th season for the team in the National Football League. Led by sixth-year head coach Don Shula, they finished the regular season with a record of 13 wins and 1 loss, and won the Western Conference's Coastal division.

The previous season, the Colts' record was 11–1–2, tied for the best in the league, but were excluded from the playoffs. They lost a tiebreaker with the Los Angeles Rams for the Coastal Division title in 1967; the other three teams in the NFL postseason, all division winners, had nine wins each.

In 1968, Baltimore won the Western Conference playoff game with the Minnesota Vikings and the NFL Championship Game in a shutout of the Cleveland Browns, but then lost to the New York Jets of the American Football League in Super Bowl III. Hall of fame quarterback Johnny Unitas had been injured during the pre-season, so Earl Morrall led the offense. Shula decided to bring Unitas back in during the second half of the Super Bowl, to no avail.

1969 Baltimore Colts season

The 1969 Baltimore Colts season was the 17th season for the team in the National Football League. The Baltimore Colts finished the National Football League's 1969 season with a record of 8 wins, 5 losses and 1 tie. They finished second in the Western Conference's Coastal division.

Coach Don Shula was let go after the season, a disappointing one many attributed to the hangover of losing to the heavy-underdog Jets in the Super Bowl the year before. It is one of the first instances of a Super Bowl hangover – in which the team that played in a Super Bowl the previous season, underperforms the next season.

Central High School (Louisville, Kentucky)

Formally known as Louisville Central High School Magnet Career Academy, Central High School is a public high school in downtown Louisville, Kentucky, United States.

Doug Buffone

Douglas John Buffone (June 27, 1944 – April 20, 2015) was an American football linebacker in the National Football League. Buffone, the son of a coal miner (whose parents were Italian immigrants from the southern province of Cosenza, regione di Calabria), attended high school at Shannock Valley High School in Rural Valley, Pennsylvania.

List of Louisville Cardinals in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Louisville Cardinals football players in the NFL Draft.

List of National Football League annual kickoff return yards leaders

This is a list of National Football League kickoff returners who have led the regular season in kickoff return yards each year.

Louisville Cardinals football

The Louisville Cardinals football team represents the University of Louisville in the sport of American football. The Cardinals compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference.

Louisville Cardinals football statistical leaders

The Louisville Cardinals football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Louisville Cardinals football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Cardinals represent the University of Louisville in the NCAA's Atlantic Coast Conference.

Louisville began competing in intercollegiate football in 1912. However, these lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since the 1940s, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Cardinals have played in 12 bowl games since then, giving many recent players an extra game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the 2017 season.

Lyles

Lyles is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

A. C. Lyles (1918–2013), American film producer

Aubrey Lyles (1883–1932), American songwriter, lyricist, and vaudeville performer

Jordan Lyles, American baseball player

Kathryn Lyles, American stage actor

Kevin Lyles, American athlete

Lenny Lyles (1936–2011), American football player

Lester Lyles (born 1946), United States Air Force general

Lester Lyles (American football) (born 1962), American football player

Nate Lyles (born 1985), American football player

Noah Lyles, American athlete

Robert Lyles (born 1961), American football player

Trey Lyles (born 1995), Canadian–American basketball player

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