Len Hauss

Leonard Moore Hauss (born July 11, 1942 in Jesup, Georgia) is a former American football center in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins from 1964 to 1977.

Len Hauss
No. 56
Position:Center
Personal information
Born:July 11, 1942 (age 76)
Jesup, Georgia
Career information
High school:Jesup (Jesup, Georgia)
College:Georgia
NFL Draft:1964 / Round: 9 / Pick: 115
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:196
Games started:192
Fumble recoveries:5
Player stats at NFL.com

Early life

Hauss attended Jesup High School, where he played high school football as a fullback. As a senior, he rushed for 1,500 yards and scored 15 touchdowns.[1][2]

College career

Hauss attended and played college football at the University of Georgia, where he became a center. He received All-Southeastern Conference honors as a sophomore.[1]

Hauss is a member of the Sigma Chi Fraternity.[3]

Professional career

Hauss was drafted in the ninth round (115th overall) of the 1964 NFL Draft. He started his first game at center four games into the 1964 season, a job he would not lose until retirement.[1] Hauss helped lead the Redskins to the Super Bowl VII in 1972. He started 192 consecutive games for the Redskins between 1964 and 1977.[1] He was named to the Pro Bowl 5 times in 1966, 1968-1970, and 1972. In 1978, he was replaced by Bob Kuziel.

After football

After retiring from the NFL, Hauss entered the financial services industry.[4]

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Flashback: Hauss Was Front And Center". Redskins.com. Archived from the original on 2009-03-16. Retrieved 2009-03-17.
  2. ^ "The History of Wayne County High School: Athletics". Wayne County High School. Archived from the original on 2001-03-06. Retrieved 2009-03-17.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-03-03. Retrieved 2009-04-11.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ "#56 Len Hauss". Redskins.com. Archived from the original on 2009-04-27. Retrieved 2009-03-17.
1966 Washington Redskins season

The 1966 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 35th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 30th in Washington, D.C..The Washington Redskins attempted to make Vince Lombardi their new head coach, but Lombardi refused their offer and the Redskins had to settle for Otto Graham. They finished with a 7–7 record, fifth place in the eight-team Eastern Conference.

In Week Twelve, the Redskins set an NFL record for most points by one team in a regular season game, scoring 72 points against the Giants. (Incidentally, this was one point less than the all-time record, the 73 scored by Chicago in the 1940 NFL Championship Game, in which the Redskins surrendered 11 touchdowns and were shut out.)

1968 Washington Redskins season

The 1968 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 37th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 32nd in Washington, D.C.. The team finished 5-9, failing to improve on their 5-6-3 record from 1967.

1971 Washington Redskins season

The 1971 Washington Redskins was the team's 40th in the National Football League, and their 35th in Washington, D.C.. The 1971 was the first with the Redskins for coach George Allen, who had been the head coach of the Los Angeles Rams for the previous five seasons.

Coming into the 1971 season, the team had not made it to the post-season for 26 seasons. The Redskins had had only four winning seasons since their last playoff berth in 1945, the most recent a 7-5-2 campaign in 1969 under Vince Lombardi, who died of colon cancer in September 1970.Allen was Washington's fourth coach in as many seasons. Lombardi succeeded Otto Graham, and Bill Austin took over when Lombardi fell mortally ill.

Despite a broken left ankle suffered by leading receiver Charley Taylor in their week six loss to the Kansas City Chiefs which forced him to miss the remainder of the season, the Redskins went 9–4–1, good for second place in the NFC East, and a wild card berth, where they would ultimately fall to San Francisco, 24–20.

1972 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1972. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1972.

1972 Washington Redskins season

The 1972 Washington Redskins season was the team's 41st season, and 36th in Washington, D.C. The Redskins were trying to build on the success of the previous season, in which they had made the postseason for the first time in 26 seasons.

Head coach George Allen, in just his second season with the team, took the Redskins to their first Super Bowl. The team, who had missed the postseason in the entirety of the 1950s and 1960s, won their first postseason game since 1943, and appeared in their first league championship game since 1945.

The NFC Champion Redskins would ultimately lose a very close Super Bowl VII, 14–7, to the undefeated Miami Dolphins.

The 1972 season was the first in which the team wore their current logo, which features a Native American head in profile within a gold circle. It remains the team's primary logo.

1973 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1973. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1973.

1973 Washington Redskins season

The 1973 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 42nd season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 37th in Washington, D.C..The team failed to improve on their 11–3 record from 1972, and finished 10-4

1974 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1974. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1974.

1974 Washington Redskins season

The 1974 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 43rd season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 38th in Washington, D.C.. the team matched on their 10–4 record from 1973. It's also notable for being Deacon Jones' first and only season with the Redskins; as well as being his final year in the NFL.

1975 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1975. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1975.

1975 Washington Redskins season

The 1975 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 44th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 39th in Washington, D.C.. The team failed to improve on their 10–4 record from 1974 and finsished 8-6.

1976 Washington Redskins season

The 1976 Washington Redskins season was the franchise’s 45th overall and 40th in Washington, D.C. The season began with the team trying to improve on their 8–6 record from 1975, which they did, finishing 10-4, second in the NFC East behind the Dallas Cowboys. They would be eliminated from the NFL playoffs by the Minnesota Vikings. This was the first season as a Redskin for Hall of Fame running back John Riggins, signed as a free agent after spending the first five seasons of his career with the New York Jets. This was also the last season in which the Redskins would make the playoffs under Hall of Fame head coach George Allen.

1977 Washington Redskins season

The 1977 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 46th season overall, and would be the last under Hall of Fame head coach George Allen. The season began with the team trying to improve on their 10–4 record from 1976, but they would finish 9-5 and fail to qualify for postseason play.

Bill McPeak

William Patrick McPeak (July 24, 1926 – May 7, 1991) was an American football player and National Football League coach.

Bob Kuziel

Robert Charles Kuziel (born July 24, 1950 in New Haven, Connecticut) is a former American football offensive lineman in the National Football League for the New Orleans Saints and the Washington Redskins. He also played for the Charlotte Hornets of the World Football League. Kuziel played college football at the University of Pittsburgh and was drafted in the third round of the 1972 NFL Draft.

Casey Rabach

Casey Edward Rabach (; born September 24, 1977) is a former American football center. He was drafted by the Baltimore Ravens in the third round of the 2001 NFL Draft. He played college football at Wisconsin.

He also played for the Washington Redskins.

In 2011, Rabach was brought back by Baltimore, but couldn't sign since he failed his physical.

Hauss

Hauss is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Alberto Hauss, a German composer and producer

David Hauss, a French triathlete

Len Hauss, a former American football center

Marcel Hauss, a World War I flying ace

René Hauss, a former French footballer and coach

Jesup, Georgia

Jesup is a city in Wayne County, Georgia, United States. The population was 10,214 at the 2010 census. The city is the county seat of Wayne County.

Wayne County High School (Georgia)

Wayne County High School is located in Jesup, Georgia, United States. It is the only public high school in Wayne County.

The school was founded in 1966 from the consolidation of Jesup, Odum, Screven and Northside high schools. Originally located on Orange Street, it moved to its current campus in 2002. However, all sporting events (except basketball, tennis, volleyball, and cross country) are held at the original campus.

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