Legatum Prosperity Index

The Legatum Prosperity Index is an annual ranking developed by the Legatum Institute, a division of the private investment firm Legatum. The ranking is based on a variety of factors including wealth, economic growth, education, health, personal well-being, and quality of life. In the 2018 rankings, 149 countries were ranked, and Norway topped the list, followed by New Zealand and Finland and Afghanistan was on the last place. In 2013, twenty-seven of the top 30 countries were democracies.[1]

Prosperity of countries according to the Legatum Prosperity Index (2017)
Prosperity of countries on a green to red scale according to the 2017 Legatum Prosperity Index

Methodology

The 2018 Legatum Prosperity Index is based on 104 different variables analysed across 149 nations around the world. Source data includes Gallup World Poll, World Development Indicators, International Telecommunication Union, Fragile States Index, Worldwide Governance Indicators, Freedom House, World Health Organisation, World Values Survey, Amnesty International, Centre for Systemic Peace. The 104 variables are grouped into 9 sub-indexes, which are averaged using equal weights. The 9 sub-indexes are:

  • Economic Quality
  • Business Environment
  • Governance
  • Education
  • Health
  • Safety & Security
  • Personal Freedom
  • Social Capital
  • Natural Environment

For example, Personal Freedom includes freedom of speech and religion, national tolerance for immigrants and ethnic and racial minorities. The Social Capital sub-index includes the percentage of citizens who volunteer, give to charity, help strangers, and who feel they can rely on family and friends.

Oxford Analytica assisted in the early development of the Prosperity Index and has contributed to shaping the methodology. Today, the annual Index is produced and published by the Legatum Institute.

The Legatum Institute operates a transparent approach to its work on the Prosperity Index. To that end, the entire methodology of the Prosperity Index along with the data used to create it is available for free online at the institute's website.

Rankings

2018 rankings

Top 30

1.  Norway
2.  New Zealand
3.  Finland
4.   Switzerland
5.  Denmark
6.  Sweden
7.  United Kingdom
8.  Canada
9.  Netherlands
10.  Ireland
11.  Iceland
12.  Luxembourg
13.  Australia
14.  Germany
15.  Austria
16.  Belgium
17.  United States
18.  Slovenia
19.  Malta
20.  France
21.  Singapore
22.  Hong Kong
23.  Japan
24.  Portugal
25.  Spain
26.  Estonia
27.  Czech Republic
28.  Cyprus
29.  Mauritius
30.  Uruguay

Bottom 20

130.  Swaziland
131.  Cameroon
132.  Gabon
133.  Libya
134.  Guinea
135.  Mali
136.  Pakistan
137.  Ethiopia
138.  Congo
139.  Niger
140.  Burundi
141.  Angola
142.  Mauritania
143.  Iraq
144.  Democratic Republic of Congo
145.  Sudan
146.  Chad
147.  Yemen
148.  Central African Republic
149.  Afghanistan

[2]

2017 rankings

Top 30

1.  Norway
2.  New Zealand
3.  Finland
4.   Switzerland
5.  Sweden
6.  Netherlands
7.  Denmark
8.  Canada
9.  Australia
10.  United Kingdom
11.  Germany
12.  Ireland
13.  Iceland
14.  Luxembourg
15.  Austria
16.  Belgium
17.  Singapore
18.  United States
19.  France
20.  Spain
21.  Slovenia
22.  Malta
23.  Japan
24.  Hong Kong
25.  Portugal
26.  Czech Republic
27.  Estonia
28.  Uruguay
29.  Costa Rica
30.  Italy

Bottom 20

130.  Swaziland
131.  Liberia
132.  Venezuela
133.  Mali
134.  Ethiopia
135.  Congo
136.  Libya
137.  Pakistan
138.  Guinea
139.  Niger
140.  Burundi
141.  Angola
142.  Iraq
143.  Democratic Republic of the Congo
144.  Mauritania
145.  Chad
146.  Afghanistan
147.  Sudan
148.  Central African Republic
149.  Yemen

[3]

2016 rankings

Top 30

1.  New Zealand
2.  Norway
3.  Finland
4.   Switzerland
5.  Canada
6.  Australia
7.  Netherlands
8.  Sweden
9.  Denmark
10.  United Kingdom
11.  Germany
12.  Luxembourg
13.  Ireland
14.  Iceland
15.  Austria
16.  Belgium
17.  United States
18.  France
19.  Singapore
20.  Slovenia
21.  Spain
22.  Japan
23.  Hong Kong
24.  Malta
25.  Portugal
26.  Estonia
27.  Czech Republic
28.  Uruguay
29.  Costa Rica
30.  Mauritius

Bottom 20

130.  Congo
131.  Comoros
132.  Ethiopia
133.  Liberia
134.  Mali
135.  Nigeria
136.  Libya
137.  Niger
138.  Guinea
139.  Pakistan
140.  Burundi
141.  Angola
142.  Mauritania
143.  Iraq
144.  Chad
145.  Democratic Republic of the Congo
146.  Sudan
147.  Central African Republic
148.  Afghanistan
149.  Yemen

[4]

2015 rankings

Top 30

1.  Norway
2.   Switzerland
3.  Denmark
4.  New Zealand
5.  Sweden
6.  Canada
7.  Australia
8.  Netherlands
9.  Finland
10.  Ireland
11.  United States
12.  Iceland
13.  Luxembourg
14.  Germany
15.  United Kingdom
16.  Austria
17.  Singapore
18.  Belgium
19.  Japan
20.  Hong Kong
21.  Taiwan
22.  France
23.  Malta
24.  Spain
25.  Slovenia
26.  Czech Republic
27.  Portugal
28.  South Korea
29.  Poland
30.  United Arab Emirates

Bottom 20

123.  Iraq
124.  Sierra Leone
125.  Nigeria
126.  Ethiopia
127.  Republic of the Congo
128.  Zimbabwe
129.  Togo
130.  Pakistan
131.  Guinea
132.  Liberia
133.  Angola
134.  Sudan
135.  Yemen
136.  Syria
137.  Democratic Republic of the Congo
138.  Burundi
139.  Chad
140.  Haiti
141.  Afghanistan
142.  Central African Republic

[5]

2014 rankings

Top 30

1.  Norway
2.   Switzerland
3.  New Zealand
4.  Denmark
5.  Canada
6.  Sweden
7.  Australia
8.  Finland
9.  Netherlands
10.  United States
11.  Iceland
12.  Ireland
13.  United Kingdom
14.  Germany
15.  Austria
16.  Luxembourg
17.  Belgium
18.  Singapore
19.  Japan
20.  Hong Kong
21.  France
22.  Taiwan
23.  Malta
24.  Slovenia
25.  South Korea
26.  Spain
27.  Portugal
28.  United Arab Emirates
29.  Czech Republic
30.  Uruguay

Bottom 20

123.  Zimbabwe
124.  Mauritania
125.  Nigeria
126.  Ethiopia
127.  Pakistan
128.  Iraq
129.  Syria
130.  Sudan
131.  Liberia
132.  Angola
133.  Guinea
134.  Sierra Leone
135.  Haiti
136.  Togo
137.  Afghanistan
138.  Yemen
139.  Burundi
140.  Democratic Republic of the Congo
141.  Chad
142.  Central African Republic

[6]

2013 rankings

Top 30

1.  Norway
2.   Switzerland
3.  Canada
4.  Sweden
5.  New Zealand
6.  Denmark
7.  Australia
8.  Finland
9.  Netherlands
10.  Luxembourg
11.  United States
12.  Ireland
13.  Iceland
14.  Germany
15.  Austria
16.  United Kingdom
17.  Belgium
18.  Singapore
19.  Hong Kong
20.  France
21.  Japan
22.  Taiwan
23.  Spain
24.  Slovenia
25.  Malta
26.  South Korea
27.  Portugal
28.  United Arab Emirates
29.  Czech Republic
30.  Uruguay

Bottom 20

123.  Nigeria
124.  Zimbabwe
125.  Mauritania
126.  Ethiopia
127.  Liberia
128.  Sudan
129.  Sierra Leone
130.  Iraq
131.  Cote d'Ivoire
132.  Pakistan
133.  Angola
134.  Haiti
135.  Guinea
136.  Yemen
137.  Togo
138.  Burundi
139.  Afghanistan
140.  Democratic Republic of the Congo
141.  Central African Republic
142.  Chad

[7]

2012 rankings

Top 30

1.  Norway
2.  Denmark
3.  Sweden
4.  Australia
5.  New Zealand
6.  Canada
7.  Finland
8.  Netherlands
9.   Switzerland
10.  Ireland
11.  Luxembourg
12.  United States
13.  United Kingdom
14.  Germany
15.  Iceland
16.  Austria
17.  Belgium
18.  Hong Kong
19.  Singapore
20.  Taiwan
21.  France
22.  Japan
23.  Spain
24.  Slovenia
25.  Malta
26.  Portugal
27.  South Korea
28.  Czech Republic
29.  United Arab Emirates
30.  Cyprus

Bottom 20

123.  Nigeria
124.  Mozambique
125.  Sudan
126.  Cote d'Ivoire
127.  Guinea
128.  Sierra Leone
129.  Angola
130.  Liberia
131.  Iraq
132.  Pakistan
133.  Ethiopia
134.  Yemen
135.  Zimbabwe
136.  Togo
137.  Burundi
138.  Haiti
139.  Chad
140.  Afghanistan
141.  Democratic Republic of the Congo
142.  Central African Republic

[8]

2011 rankings

Top 30

1.  Norway
2.  Denmark
3.  Australia
4.  New Zealand
5.  Sweden
6.  Canada
7.  Finland
8.   Switzerland
9.  Netherlands
10.  United States
11.  Ireland
12.  Iceland
13.  United Kingdom
14.  Austria
15.  Germany
16.  Singapore
17.  Belgium
18.  France
19.  Hong Kong
20.  Taiwan
21.  Japan
22.  Slovenia
23.  Spain
24.  South Korea
25.  Portugal
26.  Czech Republic
27.  United Arab Emirates
28.  Poland
29.  Uruguay
30.  Italy

Bottom 20

91.  India
92.  Senegal
93.    Nepal
94.  Cambodia
95.  Bangladesh
96.  Tanzania
97.  Iran
98.  Rwanda
99.  Cameroon
100.  Uganda
101.  Zambia
102.  Kenya
103.  Mozambique
104.  Nigeria
105.  Sudan
106.  Yemen
107.  Pakistan
108.  Ethiopia
109.  Zimbabwe
110.  Central African Republic

[9]

2010 rankings

Top 30

1.  Norway
2.  Denmark
3.  Finland
4.  Australia
5.  New Zealand
6.  Sweden
7.  Canada
8.   Switzerland
9.  Netherlands
10.  United States
11.  Ireland
12.  Iceland
13.  United Kingdom
14.  Austria
15.  Germany
16.  Belgium
17.  Singapore
18.  Japan
19.  France
20.  Hong Kong
21.  Slovenia
22.  Taiwan
23.  Spain
24.  Czech Republic
25.  Italy
26.  Portugal
27.  South Korea
28.  Uruguay
29.  Poland
30.  United Arab Emirates

Bottom 20

91.    Nepal
92.  Iran
93.  Mali
94.  Senegal
95.  Cambodia
96.  Bangladesh
97.  Tanzania
98.  Rwanda
99.  Uganda
100.  Sudan
101.  Zambia
102.  Cameroon
103.  Mozambique
104.  Kenya
105.  Yemen
106.  Nigeria
107.  Ethiopia
108.  Central African Republic
109.  Pakistan
110.  Zimbabwe

[10]

2009 rankings

Top 30

1.  Finland
2.   Switzerland
3.  Sweden
4.  Denmark
5.  Norway
6.  Australia
7.  Canada
8.  Netherlands
9.  United States
10.  New Zealand
11.  Ireland
12.  United Kingdom
13.  Belgium
14.  Germany
15.  Austria
16.  Japan
17.  France
18.  Hong Kong
19.  Spain
20.  Slovenia
21.  Italy
22.  Portugal
23.  Singapore
24.  Taiwan
25.  Czech Republic
26.  South Korea
27.  Israel
27.  Hungary
29.  Poland
30.  Greece

Bottom 20

85.  Belarus
86.  Lebanon
87.  Bangladesh
88.  Egypt
89.  Zambia
90.    Nepal
91.  Mozambique
92.  Uzbekistan
93.  Cambodia
94.  Iran
95.  Kenya
96.  Algeria
97.  Tanzania
98.  Nigeria
99.  Pakistan
100.  Cameroon
101.  Central African Republic
101.  Yemen
103.  Sudan
104.  Zimbabwe

[11]

2008 rankings

Top 30

1.  Australia
2.  Austria
2.  Finland
4.  Germany
4.  Singapore
4.  United States
7.   Switzerland
8.  Hong Kong
9.  Denmark
9.  New Zealand
11.  Netherlands
12.  Sweden
13.  Japan
14.  Belgium
14.  Canada
14.  France
14.  Norway
14.  United Kingdom
19.  Israel
20.  Ireland
21.  Taiwan
22.  Spain
23.  Czech Republic
23.  Slovenia
25.  Italy
26.  South Korea
27.  Chile
28.  UAE
29.  Malaysia
30.  Kuwait

Bottom 20

85.  Pakistan
86.  Ghana
87.  Nicaragua
88.  Ecuador
89.  Bangladesh
90.  Bolivia
90.  Cambodia
92.  Senegal
93.  Cameroon
94.  Sudan
94.  Nigeria
96.  Mozambique
96.  Kenya
98.    Nepal
99.  Zimbabwe
100.  Tanzania
101.  Central African Republic
102.  Mali
102.  Zambia
104.  Yemen

[12][13][14]

2007 rankings

Top 30

1.  Norway
1.  Sweden
1.  United States
4.  Austria
5.  Canada
5.  New Zealand
7.  Denmark
8.  Finland
8.  Germany
10.   Switzerland
11.  Australia
12.  Netherlands
12.  Singapore
14.  Ireland
15.  Iceland
16.  Mexico
17.  Israel
17.  United Kingdom
19.  Belgium
19.  Spain
21.  Argentina
22.  South Korea
23.  France
24.  Czech Republic
25.  Italy
26.  Chile
27.  Greece
28.  Croatia
28.  Japan
30.  El Salvador

Bottom 20

31.  Portugal
31.  Venezuela
33.  Slovakia
34.  Brazil
35.  Hungary
36.  Philippines
37.  Bulgaria
38.  Poland
38.  South Africa
40.  Indonesia
41.  Romania
42.  China
43.  Jordan
44.  Russia
45.  Turkey
46.  India
47.  Bangladesh
48.  Egypt
49.  Pakistan
50.  Zimbabwe

[15]

Legatum Institute

The Legatum Institute, the publisher of the index, is a privately funded think-tank founded in 2007 and located in Mayfair, London. It is funded by the private investment firm Legatum, which includes Legatum Capital, a portfolio investment fund manager; Legatum Ventures a double bottom line investment fund, the Legatum Foundation, a philanthropic organisation; and the Legatum Center for Development And Entrepreneurship at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a collaboration with MIT that funds graduate student entrepreneurs from developing markets.[16]

Personnel

The Director of the Prosperity Index is the Danish economist Alexandra Mousavizadeh. The Prosperity Index is reviewed and critiqued by an advisory panel of academics and scholars representing a range of disciplines and includes: Prof Tim Besley (London School of Economics); Dr. Daniel Drezner (Tufts University); Dr. Carol Graham (Brookings Institution); Dr. Edmund Malesky (University of California, San Diego); Dr. Ann Owen (Hamilton College).

The Legatum Institute's International Advisory Group also contributes and assists in the Prosperity Index: Prof Peter Skerry (Boston College); Prof Dan Chirot (University of Washington); Toby Mundy CEO (Atlantic Books); and Patrick Cheung.

See also

References

  1. ^ Project Syndicate, Development's Democratic Drivers, Jeffrey Gedmin
  2. ^ Legatum Prosperity Index Report 2018
  3. ^ Legatum Prosperity Index Report 2017
  4. ^ Legatum Prosperity Index Report 2016
  5. ^ Legatum Prosperity Index Report 2015
  6. ^ Legatum Prosperity Index Report 2014
  7. ^ Legatum Prosperity Index Report 2013
  8. ^ Legatum Prosperity Index Report 2012
  9. ^ Legatum Prosperity Index Report 2011
  10. ^ Legatum Prosperity Index Report 2010
  11. ^ Legatum Prosperity Index Report 2009
  12. ^ Legatum Prosperity Index Report 2008
  13. ^ "Legatum report". The Sydney Morning Herald. 2008-10-15.
  14. ^ "Austria and Finland Among Top Three in Promoting Prosperity, Australia Currently Leads the World, Legatum Prosperity Index Reveals". ANP Pers Support. 2008-10-14.
  15. ^ Legatum Prosperity Index Report 2007
  16. ^ Australian High Commission, "Australia Ranks First in Legatum Institute "Prosperity Index", Retrieved Apr. 3, 2009. Archived 2009-05-14 at the Wayback Machine.

External links

Disadvantaged

The "disadvantaged" is a generic term for individuals or groups of people who:

Face special problems such as physical or mental disability

Lack money or economic support

Gender Parity Index

The Gender Parity Index (GPI) is a socioeconomic index usually designed to measure the relative access to education of males and females. This index is released by UNESCO. In its simplest form, it is calculated as the quotient of the number of females by the number of males enrolled in a given stage of education (primary, secondary, etc.). It is used by international organizations, particularly in measuring the progress of developing countries. The Institute for Statistics of UNESCO also uses a more general definition of GPI: for any development indicator one can define the GPI relative to this indicator by dividing its value for females by its value for males. For example, some UNESCO documents consider gender parity in literacy.UNESCO describes attempts to eliminate gender disparities in primary and secondary education and emphasizes the plight of girls in unequal access in third world countries. However, the GPI ignores the gender disparity that benefits first-world women in tertiary education as in Iceland, for example, where 65% of students enrolling in tertiary education are female.

Housing stress

Housing stress describes a situation where the cost of housing (either as rental, or as a mortgage) is high relative to household income. It may also be used to describe inadequate housing for a proportion of the population.

As a rule of thumb, a household spending 30 per cent or more of its income can be considered under housing stress, and under "extreme" housing stress if spending exceeds 50 percent. Other studies may apply a different threshold, or restrict its definition to households with below average income. The Economic Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture classifies counties as under housing stress" if 30 percent or more of its housing units meets one or more of the following criteria: lacked complete plumbing, lacked complete kitchens, paid 30 per cent or more for owner costs or rent, or had more than one person per room.

Human Poverty Index

The Human Poverty Index (HPI) was an indication of the standard of living in a country, developed by the United Nations (UN) to complement the Human Development Index (HDI) and was first reported as part of the Human Development Report in 1997. It was considered to better reflect the extent of deprivation in developed countries compared to the HDI. In 2010 it was supplanted by the UN's Multidimensional Poverty Index.

The HPI concentrates on the deprivation in the three essential elements of human life already reflected in the HDI: longevity, knowledge and a decent standard of living. The HPI is derived separately for developing countries (HPI-1) and a group of select high-income OECD countries (HPI-2) to better reflect socio-economic differences and also the widely different measures of deprivation in the two groups

International rankings of Belgium

These are the international rankings of Belgium.

International rankings of Malaysia

The following are international rankings of Malaysia.

International rankings of Mauritius

These are the international rankings of Mauritius.

International rankings of Norway

International rankings of Norway

International rankings of Portugal

These are the international rankings of Portugal.

International rankings of Uruguay

The following are international rankings of Uruguay.

International rankings of the Philippines

The following are international rankings of the Philippines.

International rankings of the United Kingdom

These are the international rankings of the United Kingdom.

Legatum Institute

The Legatum Institute is an independent educational charity based in London, UK, run by Baroness Philippa Stroud, a Conservative member of the House of Lords. Its stated aim is to advance the education of the public in national and international political, social and economic policy. The Institute has over forty donors including the Legatum Foundation.

Prosperity

Prosperity is the state of flourishing, thriving, good fortune or successful social status. Prosperity often encompasses wealth but also includes other factors which can be independent of wealth to varying degrees, such as happiness and health.

Secondary poverty

Secondary poverty is a description of poverty referring to those living below the poverty line whose income was sufficient for them to live above the line, but was spent on things other than the necessities of life.In 18th and 19th century Great Britain, the practice of temperance among Methodists, as well as their rejection of gambling, allowed them to eliminate secondary poverty and accumulate capital.The term was coined by Seebohm Rowntree after his investigations into poverty in York.

Wikiprogress

Wikiprogress is an online platform for sharing information on the measurement of social, economic and environmental progress. It is thought to facilitate sharing on ideas, initiatives and knowledge on "measuring the progress of societies". It is, like Wikipedia, open to all members and communities for contribution – anyone interested in "progress" can register.

Women in Paraguay

Women in Paraguay live in a culture that has been undergoing rapid change in recent decades. Women's rights were expanded through constitutional and legal changes during the 1990s. Cultural attitudes towards many areas of women's lives are also changing. Yet Paraguayan women still face many challenges in trying to attain social equality.

The legal and government institutions that currently exist in Paraguay were developed in part through the efforts of feminist organizations in the country that held significant awareness-raising campaigns during the 1990s to formalize the guarantees of women's rights.The 1992 Constitution of Paraguay upholds the principle of equality for all individuals and prohibits discrimination. However, socio-cultural practices still support discrimination against women in some areas.

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