Lee Trevino

Lee Buck Trevino (born December 1, 1939) is a retired American professional golfer who is regarded as one of the greatest players in golf history[1][2][3] and one of the greatest Hispanic golfers of all time.[4] He was inducted to the World Golf Hall of Fame in 1981.

Trevino won six major championships and 29 PGA Tour events over the course of his career. He is one of only four players to twice win the U.S. Open, The Open Championship and the PGA Championship. The Masters was the only major that eluded him.

He is an icon for Mexican Americans, and is often referred to as "The Merry Mex" and "Supermex," both affectionate nicknames given to him by other golfers.[5]

Lee Trevino
Lee Trevino
Trevino in April 2010
Personal information
Full nameLee Buck Trevino
NicknameThe Merry Mex, Supermex
BornDecember 1, 1939 (age 79)
Dallas, Texas, U.S.
Height5 ft 7 in (1.70 m)
Weight180 lb (82 kg; 13 st)
Nationality United States
ResidenceDallas, Texas
SpouseClaudia Bove
(m.1983–present)
Claudia Fenley (divorced)
ChildrenRichard, Lesley Ann,
Tony Lee, Troy,
Olivia Leigh, Daniel Lee
Career
Turned professional1960
Current tour(s)Champions Tour
Former tour(s)PGA Tour
Professional wins92
Number of wins by tour
PGA Tour29 (tied 19th all time)
European Tour2
Japan Golf Tour1
PGA Tour Champions29 (3rd all time)
Other21 (regular)
10 (senior)
Best results in major championships
(wins: 6)
Masters TournamentT10: 1975, 1985
U.S. OpenWon: 1968, 1971
The Open ChampionshipWon: 1971, 1972
PGA ChampionshipWon: 1974, 1984
Achievements and awards
World Golf Hall of Fame1981 (member page)
PGA Player of the Year1971
Vardon Trophy1970, 1971, 1972, 1974, 1980
Byron Nelson Award1980
PGA Tour
leading money winner
1970
Jack Nicklaus Trophy
(Champions Tour)
1990, 1992, 1994
Arnold Palmer Award
(Champions Tour)
1990, 1992
Rookie of the Year
(Champions Tour)
1990
Byron Nelson Award
(Champions Tour)
1990, 1991, 1992
Sports Illustrated
Sportsman of the Year
1971
Associated Press
Male Athlete of the Year
1971

Early life

Trevino was born in Dallas, Texas, into a family of Mexican ancestry. He was raised by his mother, Juanita Trevino, and his grandfather, Joe Trevino, a gravedigger. Trevino never knew his father, Joseph Trevino, who left when his son was small. During his childhood, Trevino occasionally attended school and worked to earn money for the family. At age 5, he started working in the cotton fields.[6]

Trevino was introduced to golf when his uncle gave him a few golf balls and an old golf club. He then spent his free time sneaking into nearby country clubs to practice and began as a caddie at the Dallas Athletic Club, near his home. He soon began caddying full-time. Trevino left school at age 14 to go to work. He earned $30 a week as a caddie and shoe shiner. He was also able to practice golf since the caddies had three short holes behind their shack. After work, he would hit at least 300 balls. Many of these practice shots were struck from the bare ground with very little grass (known locally as 'Texas hardpan') and often in very windy conditions. It is this that is widely believed to be the reason Trevino developed his extremely unique (many would say unorthodox) and compact swing method which, of course, he went on to develop and groove with tremendous effect.[7] A very pronounced controlled 'fade' was undoubtedly his signature shot, although he had many other shot-types in his repertoire and he is, still to this day, remembered as one of the very finest shot-makers of all time.

When Trevino turned 17 in December 1956, he enlisted in the United States Marine Corps, and served four years as a machine gunner and was discharged in December 1960 as a corporal with the 3rd Marine Division. He spent part of his time playing golf with Marine Corps officers. He played successfully in Armed Forces golf events in Asia, where one rival was Orville Moody, who would follow Trevino to the PGA Tour in the late 1960s.[8]

Professional career

After Trevino was discharged from the Marines, he went to work as club professional in El Paso, Texas. He made extra money by gambling for stakes in head-to-head matches. He qualified for the U.S. Open in 1966, made the cut, and tied for 54th, earning $600. He qualified again in 1967 and shot 283 (+3), eight shots behind champion Jack Nicklaus, and only four behind runner-up Arnold Palmer. Trevino earned $6,000 for finishing fifth, which earned him Tour privileges for the rest of the 1967 season. He won $26,472 as a rookie, 45th on the PGA Tour money list, and was named Rookie of the Year by Golf Digest. The fifth-place finish at the U.S. Open also earned him an exemption into the following year's event.

In 1968, his second year on the circuit, Trevino won the U.S. Open at Oak Hill Country Club, in Rochester, New York, four strokes ahead of runner-up Nicklaus, the defending champion. During his career, Trevino won 29 times on the PGA Tour, including six majors. He was at his best in the early 1970s, when he was Jack Nicklaus's chief rival. He won the money list title in 1970, and had six wins in 1971 and four wins in 1972.

Trevino had a remarkable string of victories during a span of 20 days in the summer of 1971. He defeated Nicklaus in an 18-hole playoff to win the 1971 U.S. Open. Two weeks later, he won the Canadian Open (the first of three), and the following week won The Open Championship (British Open), becoming the first player to win those three titles in the same year. Trevino was awarded the Hickok Belt as the top professional athlete of 1971. He also won Sports Illustrated magazine's "Sportsman of the Year"[9] and was named ABC's Wide World of Sports Athlete of the Year.

In 1972 at Muirfield in Scotland, Trevino became the first player to successfully defend The Open Championship since Arnold Palmer in 1962. In a remarkable third round at Muirfield, Trevino had five consecutive birdies from the 14th through the 18th, holing a bunker shot on the 16th and sinking a 30–foot chip on the 18th for a round of 66. In the final round, Trevino was tied for the lead on the 17th tee with Tony Jacklin. Trevino chipped in from rough on the back of the green for a par on the 17th. A shaken Jacklin three-putted the same hole from 15 feet for a bogey. Trevino parred the 18th hole for a final round of 71, winning him the Open by a stroke over Nicklaus, with Jacklin finishing third. Trevino holed out four times from off the greens during the tournament. Nicklaus had won the first two majors of the year (Masters, U.S. Open) and fell just short in the third leg of the grand slam.[10] After holing his chip shot on the 17th in the final round, Trevino said: "I'm the greatest chipper in the world."[11]

In the PGA Championship in 1974, Trevino won the fifth of his six major championships. He won the title by a stroke, again over Nicklaus, the fourth and final time he was a runner-up in a major to Trevino. At the Western Open near Chicago in 1975, Trevino was struck by lightning,[12][13][14][15] and suffered injuries to his spine. He underwent surgery to remove a damaged spinal disk, but back problems continued to hamper his play. Nevertheless, he was ranked second in McCormack's World Golf Rankings in 1980 behind Tom Watson. Trevino had 3 PGA Tour wins in 1980 and finished runner-up to Tom Watson in the 1980 Open Championship. At the age of 44, Trevino won his sixth and final major at the PGA Championship in 1984, with a 15-under-par score of 273, becoming the first player to shoot all four rounds under 70 in the PGA Championship.[16] He was the runner-up the following year in 1985, attempting to become the first repeat champion since Denny Shute in 1937.

In the early 1980s, Trevino was second on the PGA Tour's career money list, behind only Nicklaus.[17] From 1968 to 1981 inclusive, Trevino won at least one PGA Tour event a year, a streak of 14 seasons. He also won more than 20 international and unofficial professional tournaments. He was one of the charismatic stars who was instrumental in making the Senior PGA Tour (now the PGA Tour Champions) an early success. He claimed 29 senior wins, including four senior majors. He topped the seniors' money list in 1990 and 1992.

From 1983 to 1989, he worked as a color analyst for PGA Tour coverage on NBC television. In 2014 Trevino was named "Golf Professional Emeritus" at The Greenbrier resort in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia, a position previously held by Sam Snead and Tom Watson.

Masters tournament

At age 49 in the 1989 Masters, Trevino shot an opening round five-under-par 67 to become the oldest man ever to lead the field after a round in the tournament. It came despite Trevino's words 20 years earlier, when he said after the 1969 Masters: "Don't talk to me about the Masters. I'm never going to play there again. They can invite me all they want, but I'm not going back. It's just not my type of course."[18] Trevino said that he felt uncomfortable with the atmosphere at the Augusta National club and that he disliked the course because his style of play, where he liked to fade shots left to right, was not suited to the course.[19]

Trevino did not accept invitations to the Masters in 1970, 1971 and again in 1974. In 1972, after forgoing the previous two Masters tournaments, he stored his shoes and other items in the trunk of his car, rather than use the locker room facilities in the clubhouse. Trevino complained that had he not qualified as a player, the club would not have let him onto the grounds except through the kitchen. But he later described his boycott of the Masters as "the greatest mistake I've made in my career" and called Augusta National "the eighth wonder of the world."[20]

After his opening round of 67 in the 1989 Masters, Trevino finished the tournament tied for 18th place. His best finish at the Masters was a tie for 10th place twice: in 1975 and in 1985.

Distinctions and honors

  • Trevino was the first player to shoot all four regulation rounds under par at the U.S. Open. At Oak Hill in 1968, Trevino played rounds of 69-68-69-69.
  • A major street in El Paso, Texas, was named Lee Trevino Drive in his honor, and streets in Rio Rancho and Belen, New Mexico were also named for him.
  • One of two golfers to win the PGA Tour's three oldest events in the same year: The Open Championship (1860), the U.S. Open (1895), and the Canadian Open (1904). Trevino won in 1971[21] and Tiger Woods won in 2000
  • Trevino played for the United States in the Ryder Cup six times (1969, 1971, 1973, 1975, 1979, 1981), and had an impressive 17–7–6 (.667) record. He also served as team captain in 1985.
  • Trevino won the Vardon Trophy for lowest scoring average five times: 1970, 1971, 1972, 1974 and 1980.
  • Trevino has established numerous scholarships and other financial aid to Mexican-Americans.
  • Trevino was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 1981.
  • In 2000, Golf Digest magazine ranked Trevino as the 14th-greatest golfer of all time.[22]

Humor

Throughout his career, Trevino was seen as approachable and humorous, and was frequently quoted by the press. Late in his career, he remarked, "I played the tour in 1967 and told jokes and nobody laughed. Then I won the Open the next year, told the same jokes, and everybody laughed like hell."[23]

At the beginning of Trevino's 1971 U.S. Open playoff against Jack Nicklaus, he threw a rubber snake that his daughter had put in his bag as a joke, at Nicklaus, who later admitted that he asked Trevino to throw it to him so he could see it. Trevino grabbed the rubbery object and playfully tossed it at Nicklaus, getting a scream from a nearby woman and a hearty laugh from Nicklaus. Trevino shot a 68 to defeat Nicklaus by three strokes.[24]

During one tournament, Tony Jacklin, paired with Trevino, said: "Lee, I don't want to talk today." Trevino retorted: "I don't want you to talk. I just want you to listen."[25]

After he was struck by lightning at the 1975 Western Open, Trevino was asked by a reporter what he would do if he were out on the course and it began to storm again. Trevino answered he would take out his 1 iron and point it to the sky, "because not even God can hit the 1-iron." Trevino said later in an interview with David Feherty that he must have tempted God the week before by staying outside during a lightning delay to entertain the crowds, saying "I deserved to get hit...God can hit a 1-iron."

Trevino said: "I've been hit by lightning and been in the Marine Corps for four years. I've traveled the world and been about everywhere you can imagine. There's not anything I'm scared of except my wife."[26]

Professional wins (92)

PGA Tour wins (29)

Legend
Major championships (6)
Players Championships (1)
Other PGA Tour (22)
No. Date Tournament Winning score To par Margin
of victory
Runner(s)-up
1 Jun 16, 1968 U.S. Open 69-68-69-69=275 −5 4 strokes United States Jack Nicklaus
2 Nov 10, 1968 Hawaiian Open 68-71-65-68=272 −16 2 strokes United States George Archer
3 Feb 23, 1969 Tucson Open Invitational 67-70-68-66=271 −17 7 strokes United States Miller Barber
4 Feb 15, 1970 Tucson Open Invitational (2) 66-68-72-69=275 −13 Playoff United States Bob Murphy
5 Mar 29, 1970 National Airlines Open Invitational 69-66-68-71=274 −14 Playoff United States Bob Menne
6 Apr 25, 1971 Tallahassee Open Invitational 69-67-69-68=273 −15 3 strokes United States Jim Wiechers
7 May 30, 1971 Danny Thomas Memphis Classic 66-66-69-67=268 −12 4 strokes United States Lee Elder, United States Hale Irwin,
United States Randy Wolff, United States Jerry Heard
8 Jun 21, 1971 U.S. Open (2) 70-72-69-69=280 Even Playoff United States Jack Nicklaus
9 Jul 4, 1971 Canadian Open 73-68-67-67=275 −13 Playoff United States Art Wall, Jr.
10 Jul 10, 1971 The Open Championship 69-70-69-70=278 −14 1 stroke Taiwan Lu Liang-Huan
11 Oct 31, 1971 Sahara Invitational 69-72-73-66=280 −8 1 stroke United States George Archer
12 May 21, 1972 Danny Thomas Memphis Classic (2) 70-72-72-67=281 −7 4 strokes United States John Mahaffey
13 Jul 15, 1972 The Open Championship (2) 71-70-66-71=278 −6 1 stroke United States Jack Nicklaus
14 Sep 4, 1972 Greater Hartford Open Invitational 64-68-72-65=269 −15 Playoff United States Lee Elder
15 Sep 17, 1972 Greater St. Louis Golf Classic 65-68-66-70=269 −11 1 stroke United States Deane Beman
16 Feb 25, 1973 Jackie Gleason Inverrary-
National Airlines Classic
69-69-69-72=279 −9 1 stroke United States Forrest Fezler
17 Mar 11, 1973 Doral-Eastern Open 64-70-71-71=276 −12 1 stroke Australia Bruce Crampton, United States Tom Weiskopf
18 Mar 31, 1974 Greater New Orleans Open 67-68-67-65=267 −21 8 strokes South Africa Bobby Cole, United States Ben Crenshaw
19 Aug 11, 1974 PGA Championship 73-66-68-69=276 −4 1 stroke United States Jack Nicklaus
20 Mar 9, 1975 Florida Citrus Open 69-66-70-71=276 −12 1 stroke United States Hale Irwin
21 May 16, 1976 Colonial National Invitation 68-64-68-73=273 −7 1 stroke United States Mike Morley
22 Jul 24, 1977 Canadian Open (2) 67-68-71-74=280 −8 4 strokes England Peter Oosterhuis
23 May 14, 1978 Colonial National Invitation 66-68-68-66=268 −12 4 strokes United States Jerry Heard, United States Jerry Pate
24 Jun 24, 1979 Canadian Open (3) 67-71-72-71=281 −3 3 strokes United States Ben Crenshaw
25 Mar 23, 1980 Tournament Players Championship 68-72-68-70=278 −10 1 stroke United States Ben Crenshaw
26 Jun 29, 1980 Danny Thomas Memphis Classic (3) 67-68-68-69=272 −16 1 stroke United States Tom Purtzer
27 Sep 21, 1980 San Antonio Texas Open 66-67-67-65=265 −15 1 stroke United States Terry Diehl
28 Apr 19, 1981 MONY Tournament of Champions 67-67-70-69=273 −15 2 strokes United States Raymond Floyd
29 Aug 19, 1984 PGA Championship (2) 69-68-67-69=273 −15 4 strokes South Africa Gary Player, United States Lanny Wadkins

PGA Tour playoff record (5–5)

No. Year Tournament Opponent(s) Result
1 1970 Tucson Open Invitational United States Bob Murphy Won with birdie on first extra hole
2 1970 National Airlines Open Invitational United States Bob Menne Won with par on second extra hole
3 1970 Kaiser International Open Invitational United States Ken Still, United States Bert Yancey Still won with birdie on first extra hole
4 1971 Kemper Open United States Dale Douglass, South Africa Gary Player, United States Tom Weiskopf Weiskopf won with birdie on first extra hole
5 1971 U.S. Open United States Jack Nicklaus Won 18-hole playoff (Trevino:68, Nicklaus:71)
6 1971 Canadian Open United States Art Wall, Jr. Won with birdie on first extra hole
7 1972 Greater Hartford Open United States Lee Elder Won with birdie on first extra hole
8 1978 Danny Thomas Memphis Classic United States Andy Bean Lost to birdie on first extra hole
9 1978 Greater Milwaukee Open United States Lee Elder Lost to par on eighth extra hole
10 1980 Michelob-Houston Open United States Curtis Strange Lost to birdie on first extra hole

European Tour wins (2)

No. Date Tournament Winning score To par Margin
of victory
Runner(s)-up
1 Aug 12, 1978 Benson & Hedges International Open 69-67-72-66=274 −10 Playoff England Neil Coles, Australia Noel Ratcliffe
2 Jun 10, 1985 Dunhill British Masters 74-68-69-67=278 −10 3 strokes Australia Rodger Davis

European Tour playoff record (1–1)

No. Year Tournament Opponents Result
1 1978 Benson & Hedges International Open England Neil Coles, Australia Noel Ratcliffe Won with par on fourth extra hole
Ratcliffe eliminated by par on first hole
2 1986 Benson & Hedges International Open South Africa Hugh Baiocchi, England Mark James James won with birdie on first extra hole

Japan Golf Tour wins (1)

Other wins (21)

Champions Tour wins (29)

No. Date Tournament Winning score To par Margin
of victory
Runner(s)-up
1 Feb 4, 1990 Royal Caribbean Classic 71-67-68=206 −10 1 stroke United States Butch Baird, United States Jim Dent
2 Feb 18, 1990 Aetna Challenge 66-67-67=200 −16 1 stroke Australia Bruce Crampton
3 Mar 4, 1990 Vintage Chrysler Invitational 66-67-72=205 −11 1 stroke United States Dale Douglass, United States Mike Hill,
United States Don Massengale
4 May 20, 1990 Doug Sanders Kingwood Celebrity Classic 67-67-69=203 −13 6 strokes South Africa Gary Player
5 Jun 3, 1990 NYNEX Commemorative 66-66-67=199 −11 Playoff United States Mike Fetchick, United States Jimmy Powell,
United States Chi-Chi Rodríguez
6 Jul 1, 1990 U.S. Senior Open 67-68-73-67=275 −13 2 strokes United States Jack Nicklaus
7 Oct 21, 1990 Transamerica Senior Golf Championship 73-67-65=205 −11 2 strokes United States Mike Hill
8 Feb 17, 1991 Aetna Challenge 71-68-66=205 −11 1 stroke United States Dale Douglass
9 Mar 17, 1991 Vantage at The Dominion 67-70=137 −7 2 strokes United States Mike Hill, United States Charles Coody,
United States Rocky Thompson
10 Aug 25, 1991 Sunwest Bank Charley Pride Senior Golf Classic 66-65-69=200 −16 4 strokes United States Jim O'Hern, United States Chi Chi Rodríguez
11 Mar 15, 1992 Vantage at The Dominion 68-66-67=201 −15 2 strokes United States Chi Chi Rodríguez
12 Apr 5, 1992 The Tradition 67-69-68-70=274 −15 1 stroke United States Jack Nicklaus
13 Apr 19, 1992 PGA Seniors' Championship 72-64-71-71=278 −10 1 stroke United States Mike Hill
14 May 3, 1992 Las Vegas Senior Classic 71-68-67=206 −10 1 stroke United States Orville Moody
15 May 24, 1992 Bell Atlantic Classic 65-72-68=205 −5 1 stroke United States Gibby Gilbert
16 May 30, 1993 Cadillac NFL Golf Classic 67-70-72=209 −7 2 stroke Australia Bruce Crampton, United States Raymond Floyd
17 Sep 26, 1993 Nationwide Championship 66-66-73=205 −11 2 strokes United States George Archer, United States Jim Ferree,
United States Mike Hill, United States Dave Stockton,
United States Rocky Thompson
18 Oct 3, 1993 Vantage Championship 65-67-66=198 −18 5 strokes United States DeWitt Weaver
19 Feb 6, 1994 Royal Caribbean Classic 66-73-66=205 −8 Playoff United States Kermit Zarley
20 Apr 17, 1994 PGA Seniors' Championship 70-69-70-70=279 −9 1 stroke United States Jim Colbert
21 May 15, 1994 PaineWebber Invitational 70-65-68=203 −13 1 stroke United States Jim Colbert, United States Jimmy Powell
22 May 29, 1994 Bell Atlantic Classic 71-67-68=206 −4 2 strokes United States Mike Hill
23 Jun 19, 1994 BellSouth Senior Classic at Opryland 67-65-67=199 −17 1 stroke United States Jim Albus, United States Dave Stockton
24 Jul 31, 1994 Northville Long Island Classic 66-69-65=200 −17 7 strokes United States Jim Colbert
25 Aug 20, 1995 Northville Long Island Classic 67-69-66=202 −14 4 strokes United States Buddy Allin
26 Oct 8, 1995 The Transamerica 66-69-66=201 −15 3 strokes United States Bruce Summerhays
27 Nov 3, 1996 Emerald Coast Classic 69-70-68=207 −3 Playoff United States Bob Eastwood, United States David Graham,
United States Mike Hill, United States Dave Stockton
28 Mar 29, 1998 Southwestern Bell Dominion 69-69-67=205 −11 2 strokes United States Mike McCullough
29 Jun 25, 2000 Cadillac NFL Golf Classic 66-67-69=202 −14 2 strokes United States Walter Hall

Champions Tour playoff record (3–3)

No. Year Tournament Opponent(s) Result
1 1990 NYNEX Commemorative United States Mike Fetchick, United States Jimmy Powell
United States Chi-Chi Rodríguez
Trevino wins with birdie on fifth extra hole
Powell and Rodríguez eliminated with birdie on first hole
2 1990 New York Life Champions United States Dale Douglass, United States Mike Hill Hill won with birdie on first extra hole
3 1993 Ping Kaanapali Classic United States George Archer, United States Dave Stockton Archer won with birdie on first extra hole
4 1994 Royal Caribbean Classic United States Kermit Zarley Won with par on fourth extra hole
5 1996 Emerald Coast Classic United States Bob Eastwood, United States David Graham,
United States Mike Hill, United States Dave Stockton
Won with birdie on first extra hole
6 1997 Home Depot Invitational United States Jim Dent, United States Larry Gilbert Dent won with birdie on second extra hole
Gilbert eliminated with birdie on first hole

Senior majors are shown in bold.

Other senior wins (10)

Major championships

Wins (6)

Year Championship 54 holes Winning score Margin Runner(s)-up
1968 U.S. Open 1 shot deficit −5 (69-68-69-69=275) 4 strokes United States Jack Nicklaus
1971 U.S. Open (2) 4 shot deficit E (70-72-69-69=280) Playoff 1 United States Jack Nicklaus
1971 The Open Championship 1 shot lead −14 (69-70-69-70=278) 1 stroke Taiwan Lu Liang-Huan
1972 The Open Championship (2) 1 shot lead −6 (71-70-66-71=278) 1 stroke United States Jack Nicklaus
1974 PGA Championship 1 shot lead −4 (73-66-68-69=276) 1 stroke United States Jack Nicklaus
1984 PGA Championship (2) 1 shot lead −15 (69-68-67-69=273) 4 strokes South Africa Gary Player, United States Lanny Wadkins

1 Defeated Jack Nicklaus in an 18-hole playoff – Trevino 68 (−2), Nicklaus 71 (+1).

Results timeline

Tournament 1966 1967 1968 1969
Masters Tournament T40 T19
U.S. Open T54 5 1 CUT
The Open Championship T34
PGA Championship T23 T48
Tournament 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979
Masters Tournament T33 T43 T10 T28 T14 T12
U.S. Open T8 1 T4 T4 CUT T29 T27 T12 T19
The Open Championship T3 1 1 T10 T31 T40 4 T29 T17
PGA Championship T26 T13 T11 T18 1 T60 CUT T13 T7 T35
Tournament 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989
Masters Tournament T26 CUT T38 T20 43 T10 47 CUT CUT T18
U.S. Open T12 CUT CUT T9 CUT T4 CUT T40 CUT
The Open Championship 2 T11 T27 5 T14 T20 T59 T17 CUT T42
PGA Championship 7 T14 1 2 T11 CUT CUT
Tournament 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000
Masters Tournament T24 T49
U.S. Open CUT
The Open Championship T25 T17 T39 CUT CUT CUT
PGA Championship CUT

CUT = missed the halfway cut
"T" indicates a tie for a place.

Summary

Tournament Wins 2nd 3rd Top-5 Top-10 Top-25 Events Cuts made
Masters Tournament 0 0 0 0 2 8 20 17
U.S. Open 2 0 0 6 8 11 23 15
The Open Championship 2 1 1 6 7 14 26 22
PGA Championship 2 1 0 3 5 12 20 16
Totals 6 2 1 15 22 45 89 70
  • Most consecutive cuts made – 16 (1969 Open Championship – 1973 PGA)
  • Longest streak of top-10s – 2 (seven times)

Champions Tour major championships

Wins (4)

Year Championship Winning Score Margin Runner(s)-up
1990 U.S. Senior Open −13 (67–68–73–67=275) 2 strokes United States Jack Nicklaus
1992 The Tradition −14 (67–69–68–70=274) 1 stroke United States Jack Nicklaus
1992 PGA Seniors' Championship −10 (72–64–71–71=278) 1 stroke United States Mike Hill
1994 PGA Seniors' Championship (2) −9 (70–69–70–70=279) 1 stroke United States Jim Colbert

U.S. national team appearances

Professional

See also

References

  1. ^ "20 Greatest Golfers of All Time (Updated)". Athlon Sports. June 11, 2013. Retrieved January 1, 2015.
  2. ^ "Ranking Golf's Greatest Players Ever". Golf.about.com. August 29, 2014. Retrieved January 1, 2015.
  3. ^ "Ranking the 25 Best American Golfers of All Time". Bleacher Report. October 9, 2012. Retrieved January 1, 2015.
  4. ^ "5 Great Hispanic Golfers". Bleacher Report. September 15, 2010. Retrieved January 1, 2015.
  5. ^ "Lee Trevino profile". Golf Legends. Archived from the original on February 4, 2012.
  6. ^ "Lee Trevino: Golf". Archived from the original on June 18, 2009. Retrieved November 14, 2008.
  7. ^ "Lee Trevino: Golf Swing Analysis | Wayne DeFrancesco". Members.wayned.com. May 23, 2011. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  8. ^ Yun, Hunki (August 30, 2011). "Golf and the military". USGA. Retrieved August 4, 2017.
  9. ^ Kirkpatrick, Curry (December 20, 1971). "Sportsman of the year: a common man with an uncommon touch". Sports Illustrated. p. 34.
  10. ^ Jenkins, Dan (July 24, 1972). "Slamming The Door On Jack". Sports Illustrated.
  11. ^ "Nicklaus Misses Slam As Trevino Wins Open". The News and Courier. July 16, 1972. Retrieved February 15, 2013.
  12. ^ Husar, John; Jauss, Bill (June 28, 1975). "Lightning fells 3 at Western Open". Chicago Tribune. p. 1, sec. 1.
  13. ^ "Trevino, two others survive lightning bolts". Eugene Register-Guard. Oregon. Associated Press. June 28, 1975. p. 1B.
  14. ^ Husar, John (June 29, 1975). "Heard may still play in Western". Chicago Tribune. p. 6, sec. 3.
  15. ^ "Trevino's survival a minor miracle". Eugene Register-Guard. Oregon. Associated Press. June 29, 1975. p. 1B.
  16. ^ McDermott, Barry (August 27, 1984). "It's an old man's game after all". Sports Illustrated. p. 28.
  17. ^ "Career Money Leaders – 1981". PGA Tour. Retrieved January 15, 2014.
  18. ^ White Jr., Gordon (April 7, 1989). "Wind forces high scores in first round of Masters". Herald-Journal. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  19. ^ White Jr., Gordon (April 7, 1989). "Trevino, at the Age of 49, Shoots 67 to Lead the Masters". The New York Times. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  20. ^ Downey, Mike (April 7, 1989). "Like It or Not, Lee Trevino Is Master of the Masters for a Day". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  21. ^ https://progolfnow.com/2017/07/20/lee-trevino-royal-birkdale-1971-triple-crown/
  22. ^ Yocom, Guy (July 2000). "50 Greatest Golfers of All Time: And What They Taught Us". Golf Digest. Archived from the original on December 17, 2007. Retrieved December 5, 2007.
  23. ^ Apfelbaum, Jim, ed. (2007). The Gigantic Book of Golf Quotations. Skyhorse Publishing. ISBN 978-1-60239-014-0.
  24. ^ "Memorable Video Vignettes – 1971". USGA. Retrieved January 15, 2014.
  25. ^ Carter, Bob. ""Merry Mex" was golf's showman". ESPN. Retrieved August 4, 2013.
  26. ^ Kelley, Brent. "Lee Trevino profile". About.com. Retrieved January 15, 2014.

Further reading

Hoobler, Dorothy and Thomas (1995). The Mexican American Family Album. New York: Oxford University Press. ASIN B004HOS1EC.

External links

1968 U.S. Open (golf)

The 1968 U.S. Open was the 68th U.S. Open, held June 13–16 at the East Course of Oak Hill Country Club in Rochester, New York. Lee Trevino equaled the tournament scoring record and won the first of his six major titles, four strokes ahead of runner-up Jack Nicklaus. It was also the first win on the PGA Tour for Trevino, age 28.

This was the second of three U.S. Opens at the East Course; Cary Middlecoff won the first in 1956 and Curtis Strange successfully defended in 1989. It also hosted the PGA Championship in 1980, 2003, and 2013, and the Ryder Cup in 1995.

1971 Open Championship

The 1971 Open Championship was the 100th Open Championship, played 7–10 July at Royal Birkdale Golf Club in Southport, England. Lee Trevino won the first of his consecutive Open Championships, one stroke ahead of Lu Liang-Huan. It was the third of his six major titles and his second consecutive; he won the U.S. Open less than a month earlier in a playoff over Jack Nicklaus.Trevino became the fourth player to win both the U.S. Open and the Open Championship in the same year, joining Bobby Jones (1926, 1930), Gene Sarazen (1932), and Ben Hogan (1953). Subsequent winners of both were Tom Watson (1982) and Tiger Woods (2000); all six are Americans.

Trevino also won the Canadian Open the previous week near Montreal for three national titles in 1971, all won in less than a month.

This was the last major championship of 1971 because the PGA Championship was played earlier in the year. Trevino's win, therefore, assured that Americans won all four major championships in 1971. This was the fifth time this has happened in golf history.

1971 PGA Tour

The 1971 PGA Tour season was from January 7 to December 12. The season consisted of 44 official money events. Lee Trevino won the most tournaments, six, and there were 10 first-time winners. Trevino won two majors, the U.S. Open and British Open, in a span of three weeks. In between, he also won the Canadian Open to become the first to win all three in the same season. The tournament results and award winners are listed below.

1971 U.S. Open (golf)

The 1971 U.S. Open was the 71st U.S. Open, held June 17–21 at the East Course of Merion Golf Club in Ardmore, Pennsylvania, a suburb northwest of Philadelphia. Lee Trevino, the 1968 champion, won his second U.S. Open, defeating Jack Nicklaus by three strokes in an 18-hole playoff. It was the second of Trevino's six major titles and the second of four times in which Nicklaus was the runner-up to Trevino in a major; Nicklaus won his third U.S. Open the following year.

The U.S. Open was just part of an outstanding year for Trevino in 1971 and following this playoff win, his confidence soared. Two weeks later he won the Canadian Open in a playoff; the next week the British Open, and became the first to win those three national opens in the same year; only Tiger Woods has done it since, in 2000. Trevino won six times on tour in 1971 with two majors and was PGA Player of the Year. He was named athlete of the year by the Associated Press and Sporting News, and was the Sports Illustrated "Sportsman of the Year." Trevino was the first to win the U.S. and British Opens in the same year in 18 years, last accomplished by Ben Hogan in 1953. The others were Gene Sarazen in 1932 and amateur Bobby Jones in 1926 and 1930, his grand slam year. Subsequent winners of both were Tom Watson in 1982 and Woods in 2000.

For Jim Simons, a Pennsylvania native entering his senior year at Wake Forest, his fifth-place finish remains the most recent top ten by an amateur at the U.S. Open. It is the best since Nicklaus' tie for fourth in 1961, following his runner-up finish the year before at age 20 in 1960. The last victory by an amateur at any major was at the U.S. Open in 1933, won by Johnny Goodman of Omaha. Bobby Jones won four U.S. Opens as an amateur, the last in 1930 was part of his grand slam.

This was the third U.S. Open played at Merion, which previously hosted in 1934 and 1950. A fourth was played in 1981, and a fifth in 2013.

1972 Open Championship

The 1972 Open Championship was the 101st Open Championship, held 12–15 July at Muirfield Golf Links in Gullane, East Lothian, Scotland. Lee Trevino won his second straight Claret Jug, the first to successfully defend his title since Arnold Palmer in 1962. Trevino finished one stroke ahead of runner-up Jack Nicklaus, ending his bid for the grand slam. Nicklaus had won the first two majors in 1972 and was the odds-on favorite at Muirfield, where he won his first Open in 1966. He also held the PGA Championship title from February 1971; a win at Muirfield and he would become the first to hold all four major titles at once.

Six strokes back at even-par after 54 holes, Nicklaus shot a final round 66 (−5) on Saturday to tie the course record, but played the final three holes at one-over par. Trevino posted his own 66 in the third round and held on with an even-par 71, which included a chip-in for par at 17, to gain the fourth of his six major titles.It was the third of four times that Nicklaus was a runner-up to Trevino in a major championship.

Thirty years later, Tiger Woods became the first since Nicklaus to win the first two majors of the year. His bid for a grand slam in 2002 also ended at Muirfield, foiled by stormy weather during his third round. Woods is the only one to hold all four major titles at once, completed at the Masters in April 2001.

1972 PGA Tour

The 1972 PGA Tour season was played from January 6 to December 3. The season consisted of 47 official money events. Jack Nicklaus won the most tournaments, seven, and there were five first-time winners. The tournament results and award winners are listed below.

1980 Open Championship

The 1980 Open Championship was a men's major golf championship and the 109th Open Championship, held from 17–20 July at Muirfield Golf Links in Gullane, Scotland. Tom Watson won his third Open Championship, four strokes ahead of runner-up Lee Trevino. It was the fourth of Watson's eight major titles; he won two additional Opens in 1982 and 1983. It was Watson's first win in a major in three years.Trevino, 40, had won the last Open played at Muirfield in 1972, successfully defending his 1971 title and ending the grand slam bid of Jack Nicklaus. Nicklaus, also 40, tied for fourth. He won at Muirfield in 1966 and was runner-up by a stroke in 1972.

This was the first Open scheduled to end on a Sunday, with a Thursday start. The Open previously began on Wednesday and ended on Saturday. Prior to 1966, the final two rounds were scheduled for Friday.

1980 PGA Tour

The 1980 PGA Tour season was played from January 10 to October 19. The season consisted of 44 official money events. Tom Watson won the most tournaments, seven, and there were 11 first-time winners. The tournament results, leaders, and award winners are listed below.

1983 Open Championship

The 1983 Open Championship was a men's major golf championship and the 112th Open Championship, held from 14–17 July at Royal Birkdale Golf Club in Southport, England. It was the sixth time the course had hosted, with the first in 1954.

Defending champion Tom Watson won his fifth Open Championship, one stroke ahead of runners-up Andy Bean and Hale Irwin. It was his second consecutive Open win and third in the last four, but was helped by Irwin "whiffing" a one-inch putt on the 14th hole on the third day, which cost him a chance of a play-off with Watson for the tournament.At age 33, this was Watson's eighth and final major title; he had won three of the last six majors, but had not won any event for twelve months.Watson was the fifth to win five Open Championships, last accomplished in 1965 by Peter Thomson, also at Royal Birkdale. He was the first to successfully defend the title in over a decade, since Lee Trevino in 1972 at Muirfield. Of his five Open wins, this was the only one outside Scotland.Seven years earlier at Royal Birkdale in 1976, defending champion Watson posted an 80 in the third round, finishing with a pair of sixes, and missed the 54-hole cut by a stroke.

1984 PGA Championship

The 1984 PGA Championship was the 66th PGA Championship, held August 16–19 at Shoal Creek Golf and Country Club in Birmingham, Alabama. Lee Trevino shot four rounds in the 60s to win his second PGA Championship and sixth and final major title, four strokes ahead of runners-up Gary Player and Lanny Wadkins.Trevino, age 44, was tied for the lead after two rounds at 137 (−7) with Player and Wadkins. Despite a double bogey at 18 on Saturday, Trevino carded a 67 (−5) for 204 (−12) and a one shot lead. A 69 on Sunday led to a total of 273 (−15), which set a new record for under-par by five strokes for the championship, which was later broken by Steve Elkington in 1995.

Shoal Creek hosted the PGA Championship again in 1990 and the Regions Tradition, a senior major championship, from 2011 through 2015.

1985 PGA Championship

The 1985 PGA Championship was the 67th PGA Championship, held August 8–11 at Cherry Hills Country Club in Cherry Hills Village, Colorado, a suburb south of Denver. Hubert Green won his second major title, two strokes ahead of defending champion Lee Trevino. It was Green's 19th and final victory on the PGA Tour.Trevino led after 36 holes at 134 (−8), but a 75 (+4) on Saturday allowed Green to take the lead at 206 (−7), three strokes ahead. An eagle on Sunday at the fifth hole gave the 45-year-old Trevino a one stroke lead, but four three-putts produced an even-par round with six bogeys. The two were tied as late as the 15th tee; Green continued making pars, while Trevino bogeyed 15 and 17. Trevino admitted that the $50 heavy putter which helped him win in 1984 on wetter, softer greens in Alabama hurt him on the drier, faster greens in Colorado, especially on Sunday.This was the fifth major championship at Cherry Hills, which hosted the PGA Championship in 1941 and the U.S. Open in 1938, 1960, and 1978. The average elevation of the course exceeds 5,300 feet (1,620 m) above sea level.

1990 Senior PGA Tour

The 1990 Senior PGA Tour was the 11th season since the Senior PGA Tour officially began in 1980 (it was renamed the Champions Tour in October 2002 and has been known as PGA Tour Champions since the 2016 season). The season consisted of 38 official money events with purses totalling $17,800,000, including four majors. Lee Trevino won the most tournaments, seven. The tournament results, leaders, and award winners are listed below.

1992 Senior PGA Tour

The 1992 Senior PGA Tour was the 13th season since the Senior PGA Tour officially began in 1980 (it was renamed the Champions Tour in 2003 and PGA Tour Champions in 2016). The season consisted of 37 official money events with purses totalling $20,600,000, including four majors. Lee Trevino won the most tournaments, five. The tournament results, leaders, and award winners are listed below.

1994 Senior PGA Tour

The 1994 Senior PGA Tour was the 15th season since the Senior PGA Tour officially began in 1980 (it was renamed the Champions Tour in 2003 and PGA Tour Champions in 2016). The season consisted of 37 official money events with purses totalling $29,150,000, including four majors. Lee Trevino won the most tournaments, six. The tournament results, leaders, and award winners are listed below.

Mike Hill (golfer)

Michael Joseph Hill (born January 27, 1939) is an American professional golfer.

Born in Jackson, Michigan, Hill attended Arizona State University in Tempe and turned professional in 1967. He had a moderately successful career on the PGA Tour, with three wins. His best finish in a major was a tie for eleventh at the PGA Championship in 1974.

Hill found greater success in his fifties, when he won 18 times on the Senior PGA Tour (now PGA Tour Champions) and topped the money list in 1991. He is the brother of the late tour player Dave Hill (1937–2011).

NFL Golf Classic

The NFL Golf Classic was a golf tournament on the Champions Tour from 1993 to 2002. It was played in May or June at the Upper Montclair Country Club in Clifton, New Jersey. It was a joint production with the NFL and attracted top NFL talent to play in a tournament within a tournament (separate from the golf pros). NFL players Trent Dilfer and Al Del Greco frequently played to the top of the leaderboard. The 2000 edition was also the final competitive win for golfing great Lee Trevino. In its day it was amongst the more popular stops of the Champions Tour.

The purse for the 2002 tournament was US$1,300,000, with $195,000 going to the winner. The tournament was founded in 1993 as the Cadillac NFL Golf Classic.

St. Jude Classic

The FedEx St. Jude Classic was a professional golf tournament held in Memphis, Tennessee as a regular event on the PGA Tour. The tournament was held annually from 1958 through 2018, and was played in June at TPC Southwind (since 1989).

In 2019, FedEx took over sponsorship of the WGC Invitational and relocated the tournament to Memphis in late July. The relocated WGC event continues the charitable relationship with St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. The new name for the relocated event is the WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational

Tournament of Champions (golf)

The Sentry Tournament of Champions is the calendar-year opening tournament of golf's PGA Tour season, played in Hawaii on the island of Maui. The tournament was founded in 1953; its field is restricted to golfers who won a tournament on the tour during the previous calendar year. From 1986 through 2013, it was the opening event of each tour season; the PGA Tour switched to its wrap-around October–September season in the fall of 2013.

Vardon Trophy

The Vardon Trophy is awarded by the PGA of America to the PGA Tour's leader in scoring average. When the award was first given in 1937, it was awarded on the basis of a points system. No award was given from 1942–1946 due to World War II. In 1947, the PGA began awarding it for low scoring average. In 1988, the trophy began going to the golfer with the lowest adjusted scoring average over a minimum of 60 rounds, with no mid-round withdrawals (instituted in 1988). The trophy is named for the Jersey golfing great Harry Vardon, who died in 1937.

The PGA Tour presents its own Byron Nelson Award annually to the player with the lowest adjusted scoring average for the year. It has a 50-round minimum, and was instituted in 1980.For both awards, non-medal rounds (such as in the WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship and The International) count towards the minimum number of rounds but are not included in the calculation of the scoring average.Differences in the eligibility criteria for the awards have resulted in different players winning the awards on six occasions. In 1988, 1993, and 1995, Greg Norman won the Byron Nelson Award but not the Vardon Trophy because he failed to meet the 60 round minimum for the Vardon Trophy (52, 54, and 58 rounds, respectively). This also happened to Tiger Woods in 2006 (55 rounds) and Steve Stricker in 2013 (51 rounds). In 1989, Payne Stewart failed to qualify for the Vardon Trophy because of his mid-round withdrawal from the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. In 1987, Dan Pohl won the Vardon Trophy even though David Frost and Paul Azinger both had lower averages; Frost and Azinger were not PGA of America members, a requirement for eligibility that was dropped after the 1987 season. The minimum rounds required also dropped from 80 to 60 at that time.

Lee Trevino in the major championships
Lee Trevino in the senior major championships
Lee Trevino – awards and achievements
Lee Trevino in the Ryder Cup

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