Lee Fohl

Leo Alexander Fohl (November 28, 1876 – October 30, 1965) was an American manager in Major League Baseball for the Cleveland Indians, St. Louis Browns, and Boston Red Sox.

Lee Fohl
Lee fohl
Catcher/Manager
Born: November 28, 1876
Lowell, Ohio
Died: October 30, 1965 (aged 88)
Brooklyn, Ohio
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 29, 1902, for the Pittsburgh Pirates
Last MLB appearance
September 27, 1903, for the Cincinnati Reds
MLB statistics
Batting average.294
Home runs0
Runs batted in3
Teams
As Player

As Manager

Biography

Born in Lowell, Ohio, Fohl's involvement in professional baseball began in the early 1900s, when he served as a catcher for minor-league clubs in Ohio.[1] His subsequent major-league playing career consisted of just five games as a catcher and 17 at-bats over two seasons. In 1915, he took over as manager of the Indians, with his best finish coming in 1918 when the Tribe finished in second place behind the Red Sox. He never made an important move, however, without consulting Tris Speaker, who arrived via a trade with Boston in the same year Fohl took over. In 1919, Fohl resigned as the Indians' manager after 78 games, and Speaker stepped in as manager for the remainder of the season.[2]

Fohl resurfaced in 1921 with the Browns, where in 1922 the team was only eliminated from the pennant race on the penultimate game of the season, finishing just one game behind the New York Yankees. When the 1923 Browns fell back closer (but still above) .500, he was fired in midseason. In 1924, he joined the Red Sox, where he finished his managerial career on a dismal note; his Red Sox teams never finished higher than seventh place. (In fact, he was the only man to manage in the American League between 1924 and 1926 and not be enshrined in the Hall of Fame.) He finished with a 713-792 (.474 winning percentage) as manager. He managed the Toronto Maple Leafs of the International League in 1927, but was fired mid-way through the season.

He died in Brooklyn, Ohio at age 88.[3]

References

  1. ^ "News Notes". Sporting Life. December 16, 1905. p. 9.
  2. ^ "Lee Fohl Resigns as Indians' Boss: Tris Speaker Appointed to Manage Cleveland Club for Remainder of Season". The New York Times. July 20, 1919. p. 17.
  3. ^ Ex-Indians Manager, Fohl, dies

External links

1902 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1902 Pittsburgh Pirates won a second straight National League pennant, by an overwhelming 27.5 game margin over the Brooklyn Superbas. It was the Pirates' first ever 100-win team, and still holds the franchise record for best winning percentage at home (.789).

Ginger Beaumont won the batting title with a .357 mark, Tommy Leach led the league in home runs with 6 (a major league record for fewest HRs to lead the league), Honus Wagner led the league in RBI with 91, and Jack Chesbro led the league with 28 wins. As a team, the Pirates led the league in every significant batting category, the last time that has been done in the NL. They scored 775 runs, which was 142 more than any other team.

The team allowed four home runs during their 1902 season, the fewest in MLB history.

1915 Cleveland Indians season

The 1915 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the American League with a record of 57–95, 44½ games behind the Boston Red Sox.

1916 Cleveland Indians season

The 1916 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the American League with a record of 77–77, 14 games behind the Boston Red Sox.

1917 Cleveland Indians season

The 1917 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 88–66, 12 games behind the Chicago White Sox.

1918 Cleveland Indians season

The 1918 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the American League with a record of 73–54, 2½ games behind the Boston Red Sox.

1919 Cleveland Indians season

The 1919 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the American League with a record of 84–55, 3.5 games behind the Chicago White Sox.

1921 St. Louis Browns season

The 1921 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing third in the American League with a record of 83 wins and 73 losses.

1923 Major League Baseball season

The 1923 Major League Baseball season.

1923 St. Louis Browns season

The 1923 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 5th in the American League with a record of 74 wins and 78 losses.

1924 Boston Red Sox season

The 1924 Boston Red Sox season was the 24th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished seventh in the American League (AL) with a record of 67 wins and 87 losses.

1924 Major League Baseball season

The 1924 Major League Baseball season.

1925 Boston Red Sox season

The 1925 Boston Red Sox season was the 25th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 47 wins and 105 losses.

1926 Boston Red Sox season

The 1926 Boston Red Sox season was the 26th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 46 wins and 107 losses.

1926 Major League Baseball season

The 1926 Major League Baseball season.

Akron Champs

The Akron Champs was the dominant name of a minor league baseball team that represented Akron, Ohio between 1905 and 1920.

Cliff Garrison

Clifford Raymond Garrison (August 13, 1906 – February 9, 1994) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Boston Red Sox during the 1928 and 1929 seasons. Drafted in the second round of the 1928 Major League Baseball Draft and listed at 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m), 180 lb., Garrison batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Bowling Green, Ohio.

Garrison attended North Baltimore High School, where he set a school record 57 touchdowns in his three years, a record that remains unbroken today. While attending Ohio State University, he was initiated as a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity. Initially, Garrison went to Ohio State on a football scholarship, where he was preparing to pursue a degree in engineering. However, before his first semester, under the influence of Boston Red Sox manager Lee Fohl, he was advised to play on a summer professional baseball team under a false name, Clifford Lewis, despite the fact that it could jeopardize his collegiate sports eligibility.

Professionally, Garrison posted a 2.08 ERA with ninety-four strikeouts and 112.0 innings of work in sixteen appearances. His record was 11–2 with three no decisions. Due to an unfortunate car accident in 1929, rendering him unable to pitch, Garrison's career was cut short midway through his second season in Boston. Nonetheless, Garrison continued his involvement in the game of baseball by founding the C. R. Garrison Fellowship Fund, raising money for economically disadvantaged athletes who aspired to play at the collegiate level. With such outstanding success in the field of philanthropy, Garrison became just the fifth man to be awarded the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award in 1959 given annually to a Major League Baseball player who, both on and off the field, best exemplifies the character and integrity of Baseball Hall of Famer Lou Gehrig.

Cliff Garrison died of natural causes at the age of 87 in Palm Beach, Florida with support from his wife of sixty-seven years, Denise, two sons Harry & Robert, grandkids, Rick, Rod, Randy, and the favorite of all, Melissa.

Homestead Steel Workers

The Homestead Steel Workers were a professional baseball team based Homestead, Pennsylvania. The club played in the Ohio–Pennsylvania League in 1905 and was managed by Howard Risher. Lee Fohl, Rube Sellers and Hughie Tate played for the club. It is the only known professional baseball team to be based in Homestead.

Huntington Blue Sox

The Huntington Blue Sox were a Mountain States League (1911-1912) and Ohio State League (1913-1914, 1916) minor league baseball team that played during the early 1900s. They were based in Huntington, West Virginia. Players of note include Ernie Alten, Bill Cramer, Lee Fohl, Al Mamaux, Ralph Shafer, Skeeter Shelton, Johnny Siegle, and Dan Tipple. Managers included Ezra Midkiff, Shelton, and Siegle, among others. They were the last team to be based in Huntington until the Huntington Boosters were formed in 1931.

Ohio–Pennsylvania League

The Ohio–Pennsylvania League (1905–1912) was among scores of minor league baseball organizations that popped up throughout the country in the early 20th century. During its seven-year lifespan, the league comprised dozens of local teams that served as training grounds for athletes and officials who would later distinguish themselves in major league baseball.

The association had its beginnings in March 1905, when league president Charlie Morton invited six prospective members to a meeting in Akron, Ohio. In May 1905, eleven teams joined the Protective Association of Independent Clubs, which formed the basis of the Class C Division Ohio–Pennsylvania League. Ultimately, the league trimmed down to eight teams from the following cities: Akron, Newark, Niles, Youngstown, and Zanesville in Ohio, and Homestead, Lancaster, and Sharon in Pennsylvania;.That September, the Youngstown Ohio Works won the league championship, although sources disagree on the team's final record. As one researcher writes: "The Reach Guide (1906) credits Youngstown with an 84–32 won-lost record where the Spalding Guide of the same year lists a 90–35 record. The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball (1993) tells a third story, giving Youngstown an 88–35 mark".By the end of its seven-year lifespan, in 1912, the Ohio–Pennsylvania League had enlisted the membership of no less than 40 ball clubs based in over 20 cities. While the Ohio–Pennsylvania League was disorganized (like many of its counterparts), it provided regional sports teams with an alternative to the established minor-league system. Baseball luminaries who were once connected to the league include Billy Evans, Lee Fohl, Bill Phyle, and Everett Scott. Future Hall-of-Fame infielder George Sisler signed his first professional contract with an Akron club associated with the O-P League, although he never actually played for the team.

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