League Park (San Antonio)

League Park was a stadium in San Antonio, Texas. It was primarily used for baseball and was the home of minor league San Antonio Bears.

History

The ballpark was used from 1923 through 1932.[1] It was located at East Josephine and Isleta streets near Brackenridge Park Golf Course,[1] and had a capacity of 6,000 people.[2] It hosted its first night game on July 24, 1930, with 3,400 in attendance. It burned down on June 18, 1932, after a fire started in the clubhouse.[3]

League Park was used for spring training by the Boston Red Sox in 1924,[4] and hosted Babe Ruth and the New York Yankees in a preseason game on March 31, 1930.[2]

A different ballpark in San Antonio, Block Stadium, was used from 1913 through 1923; it was also known as "League Park" after 1915.[1]

Sources

  • "Baseball in the Lone Star State: Texas League's Greatest Hits," Tom Kayser and David King, Trinity University Press 2005

References

  1. ^ a b c Whisler, John (March 18, 2015). "Diamond gems: History of baseball in S.A. runs deep". San Antonio Express-News. Retrieved November 4, 2018.
  2. ^ a b Olivo, Benjamin (September 5, 2010). "Paula Allen: DiMaggio, Ruth played several games in S.A." mysanantonio.com. Retrieved November 4, 2018.
  3. ^ "Fire Destroys Baseball Plant at San Antonio". The Marshall News Messenger. Marshall, Texas. UP. June 19, 1932. p. 1. Retrieved November 4, 2018 – via newspapers.com.
  4. ^ "Ehmke Arrives at the Sox Camp". The Boston Globe. February 27, 1924. p. 11. Retrieved November 4, 2018 – via newspapers.com.

External links

League Park (disambiguation)

League Park, and variations on that name, used as the name of a Major League Baseball park, was a designation frequently applied in the late 19th century to early 20th century to distinguish a professional team's stadium from a public park or other recreational venue. As such, the term may refer to any one of these former baseball parks:

League Park (Akron) in Akron, Ohio

League Park in Cleveland, Ohio; the most enduring of the various "League Parks"

League Park (Cincinnati) in Ohio

League Park (Houston) in Texas

League Park (Toledo) in Ohio

League Park (San Antonio) in Texas

League Park in St. Louis, Missouri, better known as Robison Field

American League Park, better known as Hilltop Park, in New York City

American League Park in Washington, D.C.

National League Park in Cleveland, Ohio

National League Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, better known as Baker Bowl

League Park, in Springfield, Massachusetts, also known as Pynchon Park

Sports in San Antonio

Sports in San Antonio includes a number of professional major and minor league sports teams. The American city of San Antonio, Texas also has college, high school, and other amateur or semi-pro sports teams.

The city's only top-level professional sports team, and consequently the team most San Antonians follow, is the San Antonio Spurs of the National Basketball Association. The Spurs have been playing in San Antonio since 1973 and have won five NBA Championships (1999, 2003, 2005, 2007, and 2014). Previously, the Spurs played at the Alamodome, which was built for football, and before that the HemisFair Arena, but the Spurs built – with public money – and moved into the SBC Center in 2002, since renamed the AT&T Center, following the merger of SBC and AT&T.

The AT&T Center is also home to the San Antonio Rampage of the American Hockey League, also owned by the Spurs. San Antonio is home to the Triple-A Minor League affiliate of the Milwaukee Brewers, the San Antonio Missions who play at Nelson Wolff Stadium on the west side of the city.

The University of Texas at San Antonio and the University of the Incarnate Word fields San Antonio's two college athletic teams.

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