Lea Schüller

Lea Schüller (born 12 November 1997) is a German footballer who plays as a forward for SGS Essen and the German national team.

Lea Schüller
Lea Schueller BL FCB gg. SGS Essen Muenchen-1
Schüller playing for SGS Essen in 2017
Personal information
Date of birth 12 November 1997 (age 21)
Place of birth Tönisvorst, Germany
Height 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in)
Playing position Forward
Club information
Current team
SGS Essen
Number 24
Youth career
0000–2012 Hülser SV
2012–2014 SGS Essen
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2013– SGS Essen 101 (46)
National team
2013–2014 Germany U17 6 (5)
2014–2016 Germany U19 15 (6)
2013–2015 Germany U20 4 (2)
2017– Germany 17 (9)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 4 September 2018
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 18:28, 29 June 2019 (UTC)

Playing career

Club

Schüller started playing football at Hülser SV before joining the youth department of SGS Essen in 2012. She made her Frauen-Bundesliga debut aged 16 on 1 December 2013, in a 2–0 home defeat against VfL Wolfsburg.[1] She scored her first two Bundesliga goals on 26 February 2014, in a 3–1 away win against BV Cloppenburg. In July 2017, Schüller extended her contract with SGS Essen for two years until June 2020.[2]

International

Schüller appeared for Germany under-17 national team at the 2014 U-17 Women's World Cup in Costa Rica, playing in all three group matches. With the under-19 team, she participated in the UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship in Israel, again playing in all three group matches and the defeat on penalties to Sweden in the semi-finals. She was then a member of the German under-20 squad at the U-20 Women's World Cup in Papua New Guinea in 2016, where they lost to France in the quarter-finals.[3]

Schüller was first called up by coach Steffi Jones to train with the full German national squad in June 2017,[4] but didn't make the final squad for the 2017 UEFA Women's Championship.[5] She made her full international debut against Iceland in a 2019 World Cup qualifying match on 20 October 2017, coming on as a late substitute and scoring the final goal in a 3–2 defeat for Germany. Later in qualifying in April 2018, Schüller scored all 4 goals against the Czech Republic in a 4–0 win.

International goals

Scores and results list Germany's goal tally first:

Petermann – goals for Germany
# Date Location Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 20 October 2017 Wiesbaden, Germany  Iceland 2–3 2–3 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualifying
2. 7 April 2018 Zwickau, Germany  Czech Republic 1–0 4–0
3. 2–0
4. 3–0
5. 4–0
6. 4 September 2018 Tórshavn, Faroe Islands  Faroe Islands 1–0 8–0
7. 6 October 2018 Essen, Germany  Austria 3–1 3–1 Friendly
8. 28 February 2019 Laval, France  France 1–0 1–0
9. 22 June 2019 Grenoble, France  Nigeria 3–0 3–0 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup

Source:[6]

References

  1. ^ "Lea Schüller unterschreibt bis 2020 bei der SGS Essen" (in German). SGS Essen. 11 July 2017. Retrieved 9 March 2018.
  2. ^ "FC Bayern holt Islacker aus Frankfurt" (in German). DFB. 27 May 2017. Retrieved 9 March 2018.
  3. ^ "0:1 gegen Frankreich: U 20 unglücklich im Viertelfinale ausgeschieden" (in German). DFB. 25 November 2016. Retrieved 9 March 2018.
  4. ^ Burgner, Benedict (27 June 2017). "SGS Essen: Lea Schüller war bei der Nationalmannschaft". RevierSport (in German). Retrieved 9 March 2018.
  5. ^ "EM-Generalprobe gegen Brasilien: Testphase für DFB-Frauen vorbei". Eurosport Deutschland (in German). 3 July 2017. Retrieved 9 March 2018.
  6. ^ "Players Lea Schüller Goals". DFB. Retrieved 7 April 2018.

External links

2013–14 DFB-Pokal Frauen

The DFB-Pokal 2013–14 was the 34th season of the cup competition, Germany's second-most important title in women's football.

2014 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup squads

This article lists the squads for the 2014 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup, to be held in Costa Rica. Each competing federation is allowed a 21-player squad, which had to be submitted to FIFA.

2015 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship qualification

The 2015 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship qualifying competition was a women's under-19 football competition played in 2014 and 2015 to determine the seven teams joining Israel, who qualified automatically as hosts, in the 2015 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship final tournament. A total of 47 UEFA member national teams entered the qualifying competition.

The final tournament also acted as the UEFA qualifier for the 2016 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup in Papua New Guinea, with the four semi-finalists qualifying.

2015–16 Frauen-Bundesliga

The 2015–16 season of the Frauen-Bundesliga was the 26th season of Germany's premier women's football league. FC Bayern Munich successfully defended the title. This season started on 29 August 2015.

2016 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup

The 2016 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup was the 8th edition of the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup, the biennial international women's youth football championship contested by the under-20 national teams of the member associations of FIFA. The tournament was held in Papua New Guinea from 13 November to 3 December 2016. This was the first FIFA tournament held in the country.

North Korea won their 2nd title in this event by beating France in the final, 3–1. They became the first country to win the U-20 and U-17 Women's World Cup in the same year, with their under-17 team winning the 2016 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup earlier in the year.

2016 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup squads

This article lists the squads for the 2016 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup, held in Papua New Guinea. Each competing federation was allowed a 21-player squad, which had to be submitted to FIFA.

2016–17 Frauen-Bundesliga

The 2016–17 season of the Frauen-Bundesliga was the 27th season of Germany's premier women's football league. Bayern Munich were the defending champions.

VfL Wolfsburg secured their third title.

2018–19 Frauen-Bundesliga

The 2018–19 season of the Frauen-Bundesliga was the 29th season of Germany's premier women's football league. It ran from 15 September 2018 to 12 May 2019.VfL Wolfsburg won their third straight and fifth overall title.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was the eighth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship contested by 24 women's national teams representing member associations of FIFA. It took place between 7 June and 7 July 2019, with 52 matches staged in nine cities in France, which was awarded the right to host the event in March 2015, the first time the country hosted the tournament. The tournament was the first Women's World Cup to use the video assistant referee (VAR) system.

The United States entered the competition as defending champions after winning the 2015 edition in Canada and successfully defended their title with a 2–0 victory over the Netherlands in the final. In doing so, they secured their record fourth title and became the second nation, after Germany, to have successfully retained the title.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup Group B

Group B of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup took place from 8 to 17 June 2019. The group consisted of China PR, Germany, South Africa and Spain. The top two teams, Germany and Spain, along with the third-placed team, China PR (as one of the four best third-placed teams), advanced to the round of 16.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup knockout stage

The knockout stage of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was the second and final stage of the competition, following the group stage. It began on 22 June with the round of 16 and ended on 7 July with the final match, held at the Parc Olympique Lyonnais in Décines-Charpieu. A total of 16 teams (the top two teams from each group, along with the four best third-placed teams) advanced to the knockout stage to compete in a single-elimination style tournament.All times listed are local, CEST (UTC+2).

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification process decided all 24 teams which will play in the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup, with the hosts France qualifying automatically. It is the eighth FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football world championship tournament. The tournament is the third to be hosted in Europe, after the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup in Sweden and the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup in Germany.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification (UEFA)

The European qualifying competition for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was a women's football competition that determined the eight UEFA teams joining the automatically qualified hosts France in the final tournament.Apart from France, 46 of the remaining 54 UEFA member national teams entered the qualifying competition, with Andorra making their World Cup debut and Kosovo making their competitive debut.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 5

UEFA Group 5 of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition consisted of five teams: Germany, Iceland, the Czech Republic, Slovenia, and the Faroe Islands (which advanced from the preliminary round). The composition of the seven groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 25 April 2017, with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.The group was played in home-and-away round-robin format between 14 September 2017 and 4 September 2018. The group winners qualified for the final tournament, while the runners-up advanced to the play-offs if they were one of the four best runners-up among all seven groups (not counting results against the fifth-placed team).

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup squads

This is a list of squads of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup, an international women's association football tournament being held in France from 7 June until 7 July 2019. Each of the 24 national teams involved in the tournament had to provide to FIFA a preliminary squad of between 23 and 50 players by 26 April 2019, which FIFA did not publish. From the preliminary squad, each team named a final squad of 23 players (three of whom must be goalkeepers) by 24 May 2019. FIFA published the 23-player final lists, with the squad numbers, on their website on 27 May 2019. Players in the final squad could be replaced by a player from the preliminary squad due to serious injury or illness up to 24 hours prior to kickoff of the team's first match.The age listed for each player is on 7 June 2019, the first day of the tournament. The numbers of caps and goals listed for each player do not include any matches played after the start of the tournament. The club listed is the club for which the player last played a competitive match prior to the tournament. A flag is included for coaches that are of a different nationality than their own national team.

Germany women's national football team

The Germany women's national football team (German: Deutsche Fußballnationalmannschaft der Frauen) is governed by the German Football Association (DFB).

The German national team is one of the most successful in women's football. They are two-time world champions, having won the 2003 and 2007 tournaments. They are also the only nation to have won both the men's and women's tournament. The team has won eight of the twelve UEFA European Championships, claiming six consecutive titles between 1995 and 2013. Germany is one of the two nations to win both the men's and women's European tournament, along with the Netherlands. Germany has won Olympic gold in 2016, after three consecutive bronze medals at the Women's Olympic Football Tournament, finishing third in 2000, 2004 and 2008. Birgit Prinz holds the record for most appearances and is the team's all-time leading goalscorer. Prinz has also set international records; she has received the FIFA World Player of the Year award three times and is the joint second overall top goalscorer at the Women's World Cup.

Women's football was long met with skepticism in Germany, and official matches were banned by the DFB until 1970. However, the women's national team has grown in popularity since winning the World Cup in 2003, as it was chosen as Germany's Sports Team of the Year. As of July 2019, Germany is ranked 2nd in the FIFA Women's World Rankings.

SGS Essen

SGS Essen are a German association football club based in Essen, North Rhine-Westphalia. The team was founded in 2000 as a merger of VfB Borbeck and SC Grün-Weiß Schönebeck. The club is renowned for the women's football team, which plays in the Bundesliga.

SGS Essen – current squad

Languages

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