Laurin D. Woodworth

Laurin Dewey Woodworth (September 10, 1837 – March 13, 1897) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio and member of the Woodworth political family.

Laurin Dewey Woodworth
Laurin D. Woodworth
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 17th district
In office
March 4, 1873 – March 3, 1877
Preceded byJacob A. Ambler
Succeeded byWilliam McKinley
Member of the Ohio Senate
from the 23rd district
In office
January 6, 1868 – December 31, 1871
Preceded byG. F. Brown
Succeeded byLucien C. Jones
Personal details
BornSeptember 10, 1837
Windham, Ohio
DiedMarch 13, 1897 (aged 59)
Youngstown, Ohio
Resting placeWindham Cemetery, Windham, Ohio
Political partyRepublican
Alma materHiram College
Ohio State University

Biography

Education

Woodworth was born in Windham, Ohio, Woodworth attended the common schools, Windham (Ohio) Academy, Hiram (Ohio) College, and the Ohio State University at Columbus, Ohio. He studied law at Union Law College, Cleveland, Ohio. He was admitted to the bar in 1859 and commenced practice in Ravenna, Ohio.

Public Service

He served as member of the Portage County Board of School Examiners. During the American Civil War, he served in the Union Army as major of the One Hundred and Fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry from July 1862 to December 1862. He moved to Youngstown, Ohio, in 1864 and resumed the practice of law.

Woodworth was elected to the State senate in 1867. He was reelected in 1869 and served as president pro tempore. Woodworth was elected as a Republican to the Forty-third and Forty-fourth Congresses (March 4, 1873 – March 3, 1877). He was an unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 1876 to the Forty-fifth Congress, losing to future U.S. President William McKinley.

He continued the practice of law in Youngstown, Ohio, until his death there on March 13, 1897. He was interred in Windham Cemetery, Windham, Ohio.

References

  • United States Congress. "Laurin D. Woodworth (id: W000735)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved on 2008-10-18

External links

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Jacob A. Ambler
Member from Ohio's 17th congressional district
1873–1877
Succeeded by
William McKinley
104th Ohio Infantry

The 104th Ohio Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Union army during the American Civil War. It played a conspicuous role at the Battle of Franklin during the 1864 Franklin-Nashville Campaign, where six members later received the Medal of Honor, most for capturing enemy flags.

1872 United States House of Representatives elections

Elections to the United States House of Representatives were held in 1872 and 1873 for representatives to the 43rd Congress, coinciding with the re-election of President Ulysses S. Grant.

Grant's Republican Party increased its majority greatly at the expense of the opposition Democratic Party. The pro-industry outlook of the Republicans appealed to many Northern voters, especially as the post-war economy exploded, and this allowed the party to flourish as the Industrial Revolution grew more widespread. The Republicans also benefited from a continuing association with Civil War victory as well as disarray amongst Democratic leadership.

43rd United States Congress

The Forty-third United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1873, to March 4, 1875, during the fifth and sixth years of Ulysses S. Grant's presidency . The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Ninth Census of the United States in 1870. Both chambers had a Republican majority.

44th United States Congress

The Forty-fourth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1875, to March 4, 1877, during the seventh and eighth years of Ulysses S. Grant's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Ninth Census of the United States in 1870. For the first time since the American Civil War, the House had a Democratic majority. The Senate maintained a Republican majority.

Hiram College

Hiram College ( HY-rəm) is a private liberal arts college in Hiram, Ohio. It was founded in 1850 as the Western Reserve Eclectic Institute by Amos Sutton Hayden and other members of the Disciples of Christ Church. The college is nonsectarian and coeducational. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission. Hiram's most famous alumnus is James A. Garfield, who served as a college instructor and principal before he was elected the 20th President of the United States.

Jacob A. Ambler

Jacob A. Ambler (February 18, 1829 – September 22, 1906) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Ambler attended the local schools of Allegheny City and also received private instruction.

He moved to Salem, Ohio, and studied law in his brother's law office.

He was admitted to the bar on March 27, 1851, and commenced practice in Salem, Ohio.

Ambler was elected to the State house of representatives in 1857 and served two terms.

He was appointed judge of the ninth judicial district in 1859 and served until 1867.

Ambler was elected as a Republican to the Forty-first and Forty-second Congresses (March 4, 1869 – March 3, 1873).

He declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1872.

He resumed the practice of law and also became interested in various business enterprises in Salem, Ohio.

He served as vice president of a bank and of a steel and wire nail mill corporation and also as president of a publishing company.

He served as a delegate to every Republican National Convention between 1876 and 1896.

He was appointed a member of the United States Tariff Commission by President Arthur in 1882.

He retired from the general practice of law in 1898 but continued active business pursuits until his death in Canton, Ohio, September 22, 1906.

He was interred in Hope Cemetery, Salem, Ohio.

Laurin

Laurin is both a surname and a given name.

List of United States Representatives from Ohio

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Ohio. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state (through the present day), see United States Congressional Delegations from Ohio. The list of names should be complete (as of January 2019), but other data may be incomplete.

List of members of the United States House of Representatives in the 43rd Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States House of Representatives during the 43rd United States Congress listed by seniority.

As an historical article, the districts and party affiliations listed reflect those during the 43rd Congress (March 4, 1873 – March 3, 1875). Current seats and party affiliations on the List of current members of the United States House of Representatives by seniority will be different for certain members.Seniority depends on the date on which members were sworn into office. Since many members are sworn in on the same day, subsequent ranking is based on previous congressional service of the individual and then by alphabetical order by the last name of the congressman.

Committee chairmanship in the House is often associated with seniority. However, party leadership is typically not associated with seniority.

Note: The "*" indicates that the representative/delegate may have served one or more non-consecutive terms while in the House of Representatives of the United States Congress.

List of members of the United States House of Representatives in the 44th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States House of Representatives during the 44th United States Congress listed by seniority.

As an historical article, the districts and party affiliations listed reflect those during the 44th Congress (March 4, 1875 – March 3, 1877). Current seats and party affiliations on the List of current members of the United States House of Representatives by seniority will be different for certain members.Seniority depends on the date on which members were sworn into office. Since many members are sworn in on the same day, subsequent ranking is based on previous congressional service of the individual and then by alphabetical order by the last name of the congressman.

Committee chairmanship in the House is often associated with seniority. However, party leadership is typically not associated with seniority.

Note: The "*" indicates that the representative/delegate may have served one or more non-consecutive terms while in the House of Representatives of the United States Congress.

Ohio's 17th congressional district

The 17th congressional district of Ohio is an obsolete congressional district last represented by Representative Tim Ryan.

This district became obsolete for the 113th Congress in 2013 as congressional district lines were redrawn to accommodate the loss of the seat as a result of the 2010 Census. Most of the territory within the current 17th district has been merged into the Akron-based 13th district.

United States congressional delegations from Ohio

These are tables of congressional delegations from Ohio to the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

William McKinley

William McKinley (January 29, 1843 – September 14, 1901) was the 25th president of the United States, serving from March 4, 1897, until his assassination six months into his second term. McKinley led the nation to victory in the Spanish–American War, raised protective tariffs to promote American industry and kept the nation on the gold standard in a rejection of free silver (effectively, expansionary monetary policy).

McKinley was the last president to have served in the American Civil War and the only one to have started the war as an enlisted soldier, beginning as a private in the Union Army and ending as a brevet major. After the war, he settled in Canton, Ohio, where he practiced law and married Ida Saxton. In 1876, he was elected to Congress, where he became the Republican Party's expert on the protective tariff, which he promised would bring prosperity. His 1890 McKinley Tariff was highly controversial, which together with a Democratic redistricting aimed at gerrymandering him out of office led to his defeat in the Democratic landslide of 1890. He was elected governor of Ohio in 1891 and 1893, steering a moderate course between capital and labor interests. With the aid of his close adviser Mark Hanna, he secured the Republican nomination for president in 1896 amid a deep economic depression. He defeated his Democratic rival William Jennings Bryan after a front porch campaign in which he advocated "sound money" (the gold standard unless altered by international agreement) and promised that high tariffs would restore prosperity.

Rapid economic growth marked McKinley's presidency. He promoted the 1897 Dingley Tariff to protect manufacturers and factory workers from foreign competition and in 1900 secured the passage of the Gold Standard Act. McKinley hoped to persuade Spain to grant independence to rebellious Cuba without conflict, but when negotiation failed he led the nation into the Spanish–American War of 1898—the United States victory was quick and decisive. As part of the peace settlement, Spain turned over to the United States its main overseas colonies of Puerto Rico, Guam and the Philippines while Cuba was promised independence, but at that time remained under the control of the United States Army. The United States annexed the independent Republic of Hawaii in 1898 and it became a United States territory.

Historians regard McKinley's 1896 victory as a realigning election in which the political stalemate of the post-Civil War era gave way to the Republican-dominated Fourth Party System, which began with the Progressive Era. McKinley defeated Bryan again in the 1900 presidential election in a campaign focused on imperialism, protectionism and free silver. His legacy was suddenly cut short when he was shot on September 6, 1901 by Leon Czolgosz, a second-generation Polish-American with anarchist leanings. McKinley died eight days later and was succeeded by his Vice President Theodore Roosevelt. As an innovator of American interventionism and pro-business sentiment, McKinley's presidency is generally considered above average, though his highly positive public perception was soon overshadowed by Roosevelt.

William R. Stewart

William R. Stewart (October 29, 1864 – April 5, 1958) was the second African American to be elected to the Ohio State Senate. As a lawmaker, he was instrumental in the passage of anti-lynching legislation and also sponsored bills providing pensions to civil servants. He was the first African American to practice law in Youngstown, Ohio.During his two terms as a lawmaker and almost seven decades as a private attorney, Stewart participated in projects and policies designed to improve the condition of African Americans. Toward the end of his life, he was publicly honored for his role in promoting interracial cooperation.Stewart retained his law practice until failing health and advanced age intervened. At the time of his death, he was one of the most prominent figures in Youngstown's legal community.

Windham, Ohio

Windham is a village in Portage County, Ohio, United States. It is formed from portions of Windham Township, one of the original townships of the Connecticut Western Reserve. The population was 2,209 at the 2010 census. In 1942, the US government chose Windham as the site of an army camp for workers at the newly built Ravenna Arsenal. As a result, Windham experienced the largest increase in population of any municipality in the United States between the 1940 and 1950 censuses: The population increased from 316 residents to 3,946.Windham is part of the Akron Metropolitan Statistical Area. Owing to its location, which is slightly closer to Youngstown than Akron and significantly closer to Warren (at 12.8 miles (20.6 km) away, even closer to Windham than the county seat of Ravenna), the village also positions itself in relation to cities in the Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, OH-PA Metropolitan Area. Accordingly, the sole bank in Windham holds membership in the Youngstown-Warren Regional Chamber of Commerce.

Windham Exempted Village School District

The Windham Exempted Village School District is the public school district for the village of Windham and Windham Township in Portage County in the U.S. state of Ohio. The district was founded as the Windham School Company by act of the Ohio Legislature (O.L., XXVIII, 93) on February 18, 1830. The district has one high school, Windham High School; and one elementary school, Katherine Thomas Elementary School.

Windham High School (Ohio)

Windham High School is a public high school in Windham, Ohio. It is the only high school in the Windham Exempted Village School District. Their nickname is the Bombers. Windham High School was founded in 1883.

Woodworth political family

The Woodworth political family is a collection of American and Canadian politicians who descend directly from colonial settler Walter Woodworth. They rose to prominence in the 19th century, serving in several states, in the United States House of Representatives, the House of Commons of Canada, and included America's first Surgeon General. In the modern era, two United States Presidents claim lineage to Walter.

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