Larry Parrish

Larry Alton Parrish (born November 10, 1953) is a former Major League Baseball third baseman and manager. Parrish played with the Montreal Expos (1974–81), Texas Rangers (1982–88), and Boston Red Sox (1988). He also played two seasons in Japan for the Yakult Swallows (1989) and the Hanshin Tigers (1990). Later, he served as manager of the Detroit Tigers (1998–99).

Larry Parrish
Larry Parrish
Third baseman / Right fielder / Designated hitter / Manager
Born: November 10, 1953 (age 65)
Winter Haven, Florida
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 6, 1974, for the Montreal Expos
Last MLB appearance
October 2, 1988, for the Boston Red Sox
MLB statistics
Batting average.263
Home runs256
Runs batted in992
Managerial record82–104
Winning %.441
Teams
As player

As manager

Career highlights and awards

Playing career

Making his debut in 1974 at the age of 20, Parrish became a solid hitter as a third baseman in the 1970s and 1980s, hitting 20 or more home runs in a season 5 times during his Major League career. He was a two-time All-Star, and in 1979, he was named the Montreal Expos Player of the Year after batting .307 with 30 homers and 82 runs batted in. Parrish is the only Montreal Expos player to ever hit three home runs in one game on three separate occasions (May 29, 1977, July 30, 1978, and April 25, 1980). In the May 1977 game against the Cardinals, he went 5–for–5, batting in 5 runs in a 14–4 victory. In the April 1980 game, he drove in all 7 runs for Montreal in an 8–7 loss to Atlanta. Parrish ranks seventh on the Texas Rangers all-time home run list with 149 and eighth in RBIs at 522. He closed out his American Major League career by joining the Boston Red Sox during the stretch run of the 1988 season; while he was with the Red Sox, the team won the American League Eastern Division championship.

After his Major League Baseball career ended, Parrish played for two different Japanese major league teams. Parrish had a career .263 batting average in Major League Baseball with 256 home runs and 992 runs batted in. In 13 career playoff games, he batted .182 with no home runs and three RBIs.

Coaching career

After retiring from the majors and spending time playing for the Yakult Swallows and Hanshin Tigers of the Japanese Central League, Parrish became a full-time coach within the Detroit Tigers organization. In 1992, Parrish was named the manager for the Single-A Niagara Falls of the New York–Penn League and won the league championship in 1993. In 1995, he was named the roving hitting instructor for the Tigers minor league system. In 1996, he returned to the dugout as the manager of the Double-A Jacksonville Suns, where he won another League Championship the same year. Parrish then served as bench coach under manager Buddy Bell for the 1997 season and part of the 1998 season before Bell was fired. Parrish was promoted as the replacement and managed the Tigers from 1998–99, compiling an 82–104 record; however, he was replaced by Phil Garner for the 2000 season. Parrish managed the Tigers through their final season at Tiger Stadium. Parrish remained in the Tigers organization as a scout from 2000–2002, and in 2003, he returned to the dugout once again as the manager for the Triple-A Toledo Mud Hens of the International League.

In 2005, Parrish managed the Mud Hens to an impressive 89–55 record and the Governors' Cup as champions of the International League. The Mud Hens defeated the Indianapolis Indians. Following the season, Parrish was named the 2005 Minor League Manager of the Year by The Sporting News.

In 2006, Parrish led the Mud Hens to a 76–66 record and a repeat of the Governor's Cup, giving the Mud Hens their third title and making them back-to-back champions for the first time in team history. This time, the Mud Hens defeated the Rochester Red Wings. The team moved on to play in the first Triple-A Baseball National Championship Game, in Oklahoma City, where they would take on the Tucson Sidewinders of the Pacific Coast League. The Mud Hens fell to the Sidewinders by a score of 5–2.

On October 29, 2010, it was announced that Parrish would become the hitting coach for the Atlanta Braves, replacing Terry Pendleton, who was moved to first base coach. After the Braves offense went from first in the National League in On-base percentage in 2010 to fourteenth in 2011 with roughly the same lineup, Braves general manager Frank Wren announced on September 30, 2011 that Parrish would not return to his duties for the 2012 season.[1]

Parrish was named manager of the West Michigan Whitecaps for the 2013 season.

Parrish was elected to the International League Hall of Fame as a manager in 2013.[2]

On September 18, 2013, it was announced that Parrish would return to the Mud Hens for his third stint as manager. He replaced Phil Nevin, whose contract was not renewed.[3] On August 2, 2015, Parrish announced his plan to retire at the end of the Mud Hens' season.[4][5]

Highlights

  • Four league championships as manager:
    • 1993 (Niagara Falls of the New York–Penn League)
    • 1996 (Jacksonville Suns of the Southern League)
    • 2005 and 2006 (Toledo Mud Hens of the International League)

See also

References

  1. ^ "Parrish let go as Braves hitting coach". Atlanta Braves. MLB. 30 September 2011.
  2. ^ "International League Hall of Fame Class of 2013" (PDF). Retrieved June 10, 2013.
  3. ^ Wallner, Peter (September 18, 2013). "West Michigan Whitecaps lose manager Larry Parrish to Toledo Mud Hens". MLive. Retrieved September 18, 2013.
  4. ^ Sipple, George (August 22, 2015). "Q&A with Mud Hens retiring manager Larry Parrish". Detroit Free Press. Retrieved August 22, 2015.
  5. ^ Kaiser, Cameron (September 7, 2015). "In finale, extra-inning win sends Parrish out on top". Toledo Mud Hens. Retrieved September 7, 2015.

External links

1975 Montreal Expos season

The 1975 Montreal Expos season was the seventh season in the history of the franchise. The Expos finished in last place in the National League East with a record of 75–87, 17½ games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1976 Montreal Expos season

The 1976 Montreal Expos season was the eighth season in the history of the franchise. The Expos finished in last place in the National League East with a record of 55–107, 46 games behind the Philadelphia Phillies. The Expos played their final season of home games at Jarry Park, before moving their home games to Olympic Stadium for the 1977 season.

1977 Montreal Expos season

The 1977 Montreal Expos season was the ninth season in the history of the franchise. The team finished fifth in the National League East with a record of 73–87, 26 games behind the Philadelphia Phillies. This was the first year the team played their home games in Olympic Stadium, having left Jarry Park after the 1976 season.

1978 Montreal Expos season

The 1978 Montreal Expos season was the tenth season in franchise history. The team finished fourth in the National League East with a record of 76-86, 14 games behind the first-place Philadelphia Phillies.

1979 Montreal Expos season

The 1979 Montreal Expos season was the 11th in franchise history. The team finished second in the National League East with a record of 95-65, 2 games behind the first-place Pittsburgh Pirates.

1980 Montreal Expos season

The 1980 Montreal Expos season was the 12th season in franchise history.

1981 Montreal Expos season

The 1981 Montreal Expos season was the 13th season in franchise history. They made it to the postseason for the first time in franchise history (the only time while the franchise was in Montreal, and the only time in franchise history until the Washington Nationals made the playoffs in 2012). The season was separated into two halves due to the 1981 Major League Baseball strike.

1981 National League Championship Series

The 1981 National League Championship Series was a best-of-five series between the first-half West Division champion Los Angeles Dodgers and the second-half East Division champion Montreal Expos. The Dodgers won the NLCS three games to two over the Expos, thanks to a ninth-inning home run in Game 5 by Rick Monday in what has ever since been referred to as Blue Monday by Expos fans.

1982 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 1982 season involved the Rangers finishing 6th in the American League West with a record of 64 wins and 98 losses.

1983 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 1983 season involved the Rangers finishing third in the American League West with a record of 77 wins and 85 losses. The Rangers did break a Major League Baseball record for the most runs ever scored by one team during a single extra inning.

1985 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 1985 season involved the Rangers finishing 7th in the American League west with a record of 62 wins and 99 losses.

1986 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 1986 season involved the Rangers finishing 2nd in the American League west with a record of 87 wins and 75 losses.

1987 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1987 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 58th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 14, 1987, at the Oakland–Alameda County Coliseum in Oakland, California, the home of the Oakland Athletics of the American League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 2-0 in 13 innings. Montreal Expos outfielder Tim Raines was named the Most Valuable Player.

1987 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 1987 season involved the Rangers finishing sixth in the American League West with a record of 75 wins and 87 losses.

1988 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 1988 season involved the Rangers finishing 6th in the American League west with a record of 70 wins and 91 losses.

1998 Detroit Tigers season

The 1998 Detroit Tigers finished in fifth place in their first season in the American League Central Division with a record of 65-97 (.401), 24 games behind the Cleveland Indians. The Tigers were outscored by their opponents 863 to 722. The Tigers drew 1,409,391 fans to Tiger Stadium in 1998, ranking 11th of the 14 teams in the American League.

The Tigers missed the playoffs for the eleventh straight season, tying a record set between 1973–83

Frank Verdi

Frank Michael Verdi (June 2, 1926 – July 9, 2010) was an American professional baseball infielder and longtime manager. He spent his career in minor league baseball, except for a single playing appearance in the Major Leagues for the 1953 New York Yankees. As a player, he was listed at 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) and 170 pounds (77 kg); he both batted and threw right-handed. He was selected to the Syracuse Baseball Wall of Fame in 1999 and the International League Hall of Fame in 2008.

Governors' Cup

The Governors' Cup is the trophy awarded each year to the champion of the International League, one of the two current Triple-A level minor leagues of Major League Baseball. It was first awarded in 1933 to the winner of a new postseason playoff system. The champions from the International League's creation in 1884 until 1932 were simply the regular season pennant winners.

Montreal Expos Player of the Year

The Montreal Expos Player of the Year award was voted by the Montreal chapter of the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) at the end of each season, until the Montreal Expos moved to Washington, D.C., US, following the 2004 season.

Toledo Mud Hens managers

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