Larry Kelley

Lawrence Morgan Kelley (May 30, 1915 – June 27, 2000) was an American football player born in Conneaut, Ohio. He played college football as an end at Yale University. While at Yale he was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity and Skull and Bones, and was the second winner of the Heisman Trophy in 1936, the year it was renamed in honor of John Heisman. His jersey number was 19. Kelley was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1969.

Kelley was an All-American and the captain of the Yale football team. Following his career at Yale, he signed a one-game contract with the Boston Shamrocks of the American Football League in 1937 but never played. Following his career in football, Kelley was a history teacher and alumni director at the Peddie School in Hightstown, New Jersey, his alma mater.[1][2] He taught algebra at Cheshire Academy and spent 12 years in the glove manufacturing industry.

The Ian Graham Athletic Center at the Peddie School holds a replica of the Heisman Trophy donated to the school by Kelley. To benefit his nieces and nephews, Kelley sold his Heisman Trophy at an auction in December 1999 for $328,110 to the owner of The Stadium Museum, Restaurant & Bar in Garrison, New York, where it now resides.[3] His health was visibly failing by then after having suffered a minor stroke and having open-heart surgery, and on June 27, 2000, Kelley died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound at his home in Hightstown, ruled a suicide by the police.[1] He was 85 when he died. He was survived by his fourth wife and 18 nieces and nephews.

Larry Kelley
Larry Kelley
Yale Bulldogs – No. 19
PositionEnd
ClassGraduate
Career history
College
High schoolHightstown (NJ) Peddie
Personal information
Born:May 30, 1915
Conneaut, Ohio
Died:June 27, 2000 (aged 85)
Hightstown, New Jersey
Height6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight190 lb (86 kg)
Career highlights and awards
College Football Hall of Fame (1969)

References

  1. ^ a b Richard Goldstein (June 28, 2000). "COLLEGE FOOTBALL; Kelley Is a Suicide; Won 1936 Heisman". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-02-27.
  2. ^ "1999 Heisman Trophy - Former Heisman winner puts trophy up for auction". CNN/SI. December 2, 1999. Retrieved 2008-01-06.
  3. ^ The selling price was a record for a Heisman, easily surpassing the $230,000 that O.J. Simpson's Heisman earned at auction. John D. Lukacs (December 7, 2007). "From the legendary to the little-known, Heisman history is never dull". ESPN. Retrieved 2008-01-06.

External links

1934 College Football All-America Team

The 1934 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1934. The nine selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1934 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the United Press (UP), (4) the All-America Board (AAB), (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Liberty magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) the North American Newspaper Alliance (NANA), and (9) the Sporting News (SN).

No player was the unanimous choice of all nine selectors. Quarterback Bobby Grayson of Stanford and fullback Pug Lund of Minnesota led the group with first-team designations from eight of the nine official selectors. Dixie Howell of Alabama and Chuck Hartwig of Pittsburgh each received six official first-team designations.

1935 college football season

The 1935 college football season was the last one before the Associated Press writers' poll was used in selecting the national champion. The Dickinson System, consisting of the calculations of University of Illinois Professor Frank Dickinson, crowned Southern Methodist University (SMU) as the best in the nation. A poll of newspaper writers, taken at year's end—by United Press rather than the AP—concluded that Minnesota was the best in the nation.

The 1935 season also marked the first time the Heisman Trophy was awarded. It was won by Jay Berwanger of Chicago. Halfback Ray Zeh of Case Western Reserve led the nation in scoring.

1936 College Football All-America Team

The 1936 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1936. The nine selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1936 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the United Press (UP), (4) the All-America Board (AAB), (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Liberty magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) the North American Newspaper Alliance (NANA), and (9) the Sporting News (SN).

1936 college football season

The 1936 college football season was the first in which the Associated Press writers' poll selected a national champion. The first AP poll, taken of 35 writers, was released on October 20, 1936. Each writer listed his choice for the top ten teams, and points were tallied based on 10 for first place, 9 for second, etc., and the AP then ranked the twenty teams with the highest number of points. In the first poll, Minnesota received 32 first place votes, and 3 votes for an additional 25 points, for a total of 345 altogether.

The 1936 season also saw the addition of another major New Year's Day bowl game, as Dallas hosted the first Cotton Bowl Classic.

1937 NFL Draft

The 1937 National Football League Draft was the second draft held by the National Football League (NFL). The draft took place December 12, 1936, at the Hotel Lincoln in New York City. The draft consisted of 10 rounds, with 100 player selections, two of which would later become members of the Professional Football Hall of Fame. Notable for this draft were the league's draft selections for a planned expansion team, the Cleveland Rams, who were admitted into the league prior to the 1937 season.

1976–77 Syracuse Orangemen basketball team

The 1976–77 Syracuse Orangemen basketball team represented Syracuse University during the 1976–77 NCAA men's basketball season.

Boston Shamrocks (AFL)

The Boston Shamrocks were a professional American football team based in Boston, Massachusetts. The team played in the second American Football League from 1936 to 1937, followed by at least one year as an independent in 1938. The team was coached by George Kenneally and split its games between Braves Field and Fenway Park.The Shamrocks were a successful franchise in the AFL, outdrawing the NFL's Boston Redskins and prompting George Preston Marshall to move the Redskins to Washington, D.C., where the team remains to this day. During the 1936 American Football League season, the Shamrocks won the league's championship. The Shamrocks did not fare so well in 1937, falling to a 2-7 record that year. During that year, the team managed to sign former Heisman Trophy winner Larry Kelley to a one-game contract; Kelley reneged on the deal and never played.After the failure of the second AFL (and no apparent effort to join the succeeding minor leagues), the Shamrocks continued as an independent, picking up mostly players that had been released from the Pittsburgh Pirates (now the Pittsburgh Steelers). The Steelers, led by Byron White, defeated the Shamrocks 16-6 that year.

Conneaut, Ohio

Conneaut ( KON-ee-awt) is a city in Ashtabula County, Ohio, United States, along Lake Erie at the mouth of Conneaut Creek. The population was 12,841 at the 2010 Census. Conneaut is located at the far northeastern corner of the state.

Ducky Pond

Raymond W. "Ducky" Pond (February 17, 1902 – August 25, 1982) was an American football and baseball player and football coach. He was the head football coach at Yale University from 1934 to 1940, and at Bates College in 1941 and from 1946 to 1951, compiling career college football record of 52–55–3. Pond's record at Yale was 30–25–2 record, including a 4–3 mark versus Harvard. He mentored two of the first three winners of the Heisman Trophy, Larry Kelley and Clint Frank. At Bates, Pond led the undefeated and untied 1946 Bobcats squad to the inaugural Glass Bowl.Pond was a public relations executive after his career in athletics.

Heisman Trophy

The Heisman Memorial Trophy (usually known colloquially as the Heisman Trophy or The Heisman), is awarded annually to a player in NCAA football. Winners epitomize great ability combined with diligence, perseverance, and hard work. It is presented by the Heisman Trophy Trust in early December before the postseason bowl games.

The award was created by the Downtown Athletic Club in 1935 to recognize "the most valuable college football player east of the Mississippi," and was first awarded to University of Chicago halfback Jay Berwanger. After the death in October 1936 of the Club's athletic director, John Heisman, the award was named in his honor and broadened to include players west of the Mississippi. Heisman had been active in college athletics as a football player; a head football, basketball, and baseball coach; and an athletic director. It is the oldest of several overall awards in college football, including the Maxwell Award, Walter Camp Award, and the AP Player of the Year. The Heisman and the AP Player of the Year honor the most outstanding player, while the Maxwell and the Walter Camp award recognizes the best player, and the Archie Griffin Award recognizes the most valuable player. The most recent winner of the Heisman Trophy is University of Oklahoma quarterback Kyler Murray.

Hightstown, New Jersey

Hightstown is a borough in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 5,494, reflecting an increase of 278 (+5.3%) from the 5,216 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 90 (+1.8%) from the 5,126 counted in the 1990 Census.Hightstown was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 5, 1853, within portions of East Windsor Township. The borough became fully independent c. 1894. Additional portions of East Windsor Township were annexed in 1913, 1915 and 1927. It was named for John and Mary Hight, who established a tavern in the area in the 1750s.

Johnny Rodgers

Johnny Steven Rodgers (born July 5, 1951) is an American former gridiron football player. He played college football at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, where he won the Heisman Trophy in 1972. Rodgers played professionally in the Canadian Football League (CFL) with the Montreal Alouettes and in the National Football League (NFL) with the San Diego Chargers. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2000.

List of Heisman Trophy winners

The Heisman Trophy, one of the highest individual awards in American college football, has been awarded 81 times since its creation in 1935, including 79 unique winners and one two-time winner. The trophy is given annually to the most outstanding college football player in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), and is awarded by the Heisman Trust, successors of the awards from the Downtown Athletic Club at an annual ceremony at the PlayStation Theater in Times Square, Manhattan.

In 1935, the award, then known as the DAC Trophy, was created by New York City's Downtown Athletic Club to recognize the best college football player "east of the Mississippi River". In that inaugural year, the award went to Jay Berwanger from the University of Chicago. Berwanger was later drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League but declined to sign for them. He never played professional football for any team, instead choosing to pursue a career in business. In 1936, the club's athletic director, football pioneer John Heisman, died and the trophy was renamed in his honor. Larry Kelley, the second winner of the award, was the first to win it as the "Heisman Trophy". In addition to the name change, the award also became a nationwide achievement. With the new name, players west of the Mississippi became eligible; the first player from the western United States was selected in 1938. Only one player, Ohio State's Archie Griffin, has won the award twice.On June 10, 2010, following several years of investigation, the NCAA announced that USC running back Reggie Bush, the 2005 Heisman trophy winner, received gifts from agents while still in college. The university received major sanctions, and there were reports that the Heisman Trophy Trust would strip his award. In September of that year, Bush voluntarily forfeited his title as the 2005 winner. The Heisman Trust decided to leave the award vacated with no new winner to be announced.Between 1936 and 2001, the award was given at an annual gala ceremony at the Downtown Athletic Club in New York City. The Downtown Athletic Club's facilities were damaged during the September 11, 2001 attacks. Due to financial difficulties stemming from the damage, the DAC declared bankruptcy in 2002, turning over its building to creditors. Following the club's bankruptcy and the loss of the original Downtown Athletic Club building, the Yale Club of New York City assumed presenting honors in 2002 and 2003. The ceremony was moved to the New York Marriott Marquis in Times Square for the 2002, 2003, and 2004 presentations, but since 2005, the event has been held at the venue now known as PlayStation Theater, also in Times Square. The move to the PlayStation Theater allowed the Downtown Athletic Club (and ultimately, the award's successor, The Heisman Trust) to resume full control of the event—the most prominent example of which was the return of the official portraits of past winners—despite the loss of the original presentation hall.In terms of balloting, the fifty states of the U.S. are split into six regions (Far West, Mid Atlantic, Mid West, North East, South, South West), and six regional representatives are selected to appoint voters in their states. Each region has 145 media votes, for a total of 870 votes. In addition, all previous Heisman winners may vote, and one final vote is counted through public balloting. The Heisman ballots contain a 3-2-1 point system, in which each ballot ranks the voter's top three players and awards them three points for a first-place daddy vote, two points for a second-place vote, and one point for a third-place vote. The points are tabulated, and the player with the highest total of points across all ballots wins the Heisman Trophy.

List of Yale Bulldogs in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Yale Bulldogs football players in the NFL Draft.

List of people from Lycoming County, Pennsylvania

The following is a list of people from Lycoming County, Pennsylvania. Inclusion on the list should be reserved for notable people past and present who have resided in the county, either in cities or rural areas.

Now They Call Me Infidel

Now They Call Me Infidel: Why I Renounced Jihad for America, Israel, and the War on Terror is a best-selling book authored by Egyptian-American human rights activist Nonie Darwish. First published by Sentinel in 2006, the book discusses —among other topics—Darwish's change in attitude toward Jews and Israelis, Islamic extremism in the United States and Darwish's trip to Israel. The book has made Dawrish "one of the heroines of the Conservative Right."In a review for the Hoover Institution, author Aaron Mannes says that Now They Call Me Infidel provides support for the claim that "improving the status of women is essential to reform in the Muslim world." In a review for Human Events, Larry Kelley says the "book is a blistering indictment of a misogynistic polygamous world of the supposedly moderate Egyptian society." Jim Hulston, writing in the Electronic Intifada, was generally critical of the book, saying, "as a whole, the book is tedious, predictable, and badly edited -- born to be bought, scanned and displayed, not actually read."

Peddie School

Peddie School is a college preparatory school in Hightstown, in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States. It is a non-denominational, coeducational boarding school located on a 280-acre (110 ha) campus, and serves students in the ninth through twelfth grades, plus a small post-graduate class. The school has been accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Secondary Schools since 1928.In its 2015 rankings, Business Insider ranked the school's tuition as the 18th most expensive private high school tuition in the United States, with tuition and fees of $44,800. The site ranked Peddie 13th on its 2015 list of the Most Elite Boarding Schools In The US, with rankings based on the size of each school's endowment, average SAT scores and selectivity.As of the 2015-16 school year, the school had an enrollment of 544 students and 79.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 6.9:1. The school's student body was 59.2% White, 16.0% Asian, 12.9% Black, 6.1% Hispanic and 5.9% two or more races. Peddie had 62% of students in residence. The student body represented 26 states as well as 29 foreign countries. Peddie had an average class size of 12. The senior class of 2015 was composed of 141 seniors, including 13 post-graduate students.Peter Quinn succeeded John Green as head of school in 2013.

Princeton–Yale football rivalry

The Princeton–Yale football rivalry is an American college football rivalry between the Princeton Tigers of Princeton University and the Yale Bulldogs of Yale University. The football rivalry is among the oldest in American sports.

Yale Bulldogs football

The Yale Bulldogs football program represents Yale University in college football at the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (formerly Division I-AA). Yale's football program is one of the oldest in the world (i.e. North America), having begun competing in the sport in 1872. The Bulldogs have a legacy that includes 27 national championships, two of the first three Heisman Trophy winners (Larry Kelley in 1936 and Clint Frank in 1937), 100 consensus All-Americans, 28 College Football Hall of Fame inductees, including the "Father of American Football" Walter Camp, the first professional football player Pudge Heffelfinger, and coaching giants Amos Alonzo Stagg, Howard Jones, Tad Jones and Carmen Cozza. With 890 wins, Yale ranks second in wins in college football history, trailing only the University of Michigan.

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