Larry Elkins

Lawrence Clayton "Larry" Elkins (born July 28, 1943) is a former American football player. He was a two-time All-American flanker at Baylor and later for the AFL's Houston Oilers.

Larry Elkins
No. 26
Position:Wide receiver
Personal information
Born:July 28, 1943 (age 75)
Career information
High school:Brownwood (TX)
College:Baylor
NFL Draft:1965 / Round: 1 / Pick: 10
AFL draft:1965 / Round: 1 / Pick: 2
(by the Houston Oilers)[1]
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:24
Receiving yards:315
Touchdowns:3
Player stats at PFR

Early life

Elkins is the youngest of ten children.[2] One of his mother's ex-husbands was Marshall Ratliff, best known as one of three perpetrators of the infamous Santa Claus Bank Robbery.[2][3]

College career

Elkins was an all-around athletic star at Brownwood High School and turned down a $25,000 baseball offer to enroll at Baylor University. He had received an offer from the Texas Longhorns, then coached by legend Darrell Royal, but chose Baylor on the recommendation of his high school coach Gordon Wood, who felt that the Bears' pro-style offense suited Elkins better.[3] One of the best receivers in Baylor history, Elkins set a NCAA record with his seventy catches in 1963.[2] Elkins also played safety for the defense and returned kicks. In 1962, he had a ninety-two-yard punt return against TCU. For his career, he caught 144 passes for 2,094 yards with a school-record nineteen touchdowns. He still shares Baylor's single-game record for receptions with twelve, which he caught against Texas in 1963. He ranks number three in all-time career receptions and career receiving yards.

Elkins was a consensus All-American his last two years (1963, 1964) — Baylor's first-ever two-time consensus pick. He played in the 1965 East-West Shrine Game, Coaches All-America Game, and Hula Bowl. He was MVP of the Hula Bowl. He appeared on the Tonight Show Dec. 3, 1964 as part of the Look Magazine All-American Football Team with his contemporaries Fred Biletnikoff, Craig Morton and Gayle Sayers. He was chosen by Johnny Carson because of his deep Texas accent to simulate a television commercial.

Elkins was inducted into the Baylor Athletic Hall of Fame in 1976 and into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1994.

Professional career

He was drafted in the first round of the 1965 NFL Draft by the Green Bay Packers and second overall in the 1965 AFL Draft by the Houston Oilers, one selection after the New York Jets drafted Alabama quarterback Joe Namath. He was with Houston from 1965 to 1968. He suffered a knee injury in training camp with the Oilers in 1965 and was not on their active roster that year. His first season was 1966.

But Elkins' pro career never really got off the ground. After going to the Steelers, he broke his collarbone in a 1969 preseason game after earning a starting job with the Pittsburgh Steelers. "Rather unlucky, I suppose," he told the Baylor Line in 2001.

After football

After leaving football, Elkins became something of a globe-trotter. From 1971 to 1978, he worked for Brown and Root Inc. in the safety, health, and claims department, both in the United States and in Europe.[2] From 1979-82, he worked with off-shore drilling companies in the Gulf of Mexico and in Africa. Elkins described the years of 1982 to 1989 as "various midlife crises endeavors, including stints with the artistic peoples in the entertainment business." He spent ten months renovating parts of Robert Duvall's horse farm in Virginia and took the actor all over Texas to research accents for his 1983 movie Tender Mercies. When Duvall won the Oscar the movie that year, Elkins was there as his special guest.

Duvall also asked him to find him the voice and character of Augustus McRae in Lonesome Dove. Elkins introduced himto the legendary quarterback, Sammy Baugh, who was retired to his ranch in Rotan, Texas. Elkins said he also rubbed shoulders with Gene Hackman, Robert De Niro, Meryl Streep, and Robert Redford during those years.

After that, Elkins spent more than a dozen years in Saudi Arabia, where he was a consultant for the country's Ministry of Water, which managed twenty-six desalination plants and several pipelines and pumping stations along the Red Sea and Persian Gulf.

Now Elkins has retired and moved back to his hometown of Brownwood, where he lives in a little bungalow on a hilltop overlooking Lake Brownwood.

References

  1. ^ "1965 AFL Draft". Archived from the original on February 25, 2017. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d "Baylor football star Lawrence Elkins took roundabout route to Texas Sports Hall of Fame". Dallas Morning News. 7 February 2010.
  3. ^ a b "Baylor legend Elkins helped shape future of college football, gets Hall of Fame nod". Waco Tribune-Herald. November 14, 2009.

See also

1962 Baylor Bears football team

The 1962 Baylor Bears football team represented Baylor University in the Southwest Conference (SWC) during the 1962 college football season. In their fourth season under head coach John Bridgers, the Bears compiled a 4–6 record (3–4 against conference opponents), tied for fourth place in the conference, and were outscored by opponents by a combined total of 169 to 159. They played their home games at Baylor Stadium in Waco, Texas.

The team's statistical leaders included Don Trull with 1,627 passing yards, Tom Davies with 230 rushing yards, Ronnie Goodwin with 414 receiving yards, and Trull, Goodwin, and Larry Elkins each with 24 points scored. Robert Black was the team captain.

1963 All-Southwest Conference football team

The 1963 All-Southwest Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Southwest Conference teams for the 1963 college football season. The selectors for the 1963 season included the Associated Press (AP) and the United Press International (UPI). Players selected as first-team players by both the AP and UPI are designated in bold.

1963 Baylor Bears football team

The 1963 Baylor Bears football team represented Baylor University in the Southwest Conference (SWC) during the 1963 college football season. In their fifth season under head coach John Bridgers, the Bears compiled an 8–3 record (6–1 against conference opponents), finished in second place in the conference, defeated LSU in the 1963 Bluebonnet Bowl, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 205 to 120. They played their home games at Baylor Stadium in Waco, Texas.

The team's statistical leaders included Don Trull with 2,157 passing yards and 60 points scored, Dalton Hoffman with 458 rushing yards, and Larry Elkins with 873 receiving yards. Trull and Bobby Crenshaw were the team captains.

1963 College Football All-America Team

The 1963 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1963. The seven selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1963 season are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Central Press Association (CP), (4) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (5) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (6) the Sporting News, and (7) the United Press International (UPI).

1964 All-Southwest Conference football team

The 1964 All-Southwest Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Southwest Conference teams for the 1964 college football season. The selectors for the 1964 season included the Associated Press (AP) and the United Press International (UPI). Players selected as first-team players by both the AP and UPI are designated in bold.

1964 Baylor Bears football team

The 1964 Baylor Bears football team represented Baylor University in the Southwest Conference (SWC) during the 1964 college football season. In their sixth season under head coach John Bridgers, the Bears compiled a 5–5 record (4–3 against conference opponents), finished in third place in the conference, and were outscored by opponents by a combined total of 176 to 162. They played their home games at Baylor Stadium in Waco, Texas.

The team's statistical leaders included Terry Southall with 1,623 passing yards, Tom Davies with 401 rushing yards, and Larry Elkins with 851 receiving yards and 42 points scored. Bobby R. Maples and James W. Rust were the team captains.

1964 College Football All-America Team

The 1964 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1964. The six selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1964 season are (1) the Associated Press (AP), (2) the United Press International (UPI), (3) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (4) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (5) the Central Press Association (CP), and (6) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA). Other selectors include Time magazine, Football News, and The Sporting News.

AP, UPI, NEA, and Central Press were all press organizations that polled writers and players. FWAA was also a poll of writers, and the AFCA was a poll of college coaches. The Sporting News and Time magazine polled football scouts and coaches. AP, UPI, NEA, Central Press, and The Sporting News chose both first and second teams. AP, UPI, NEA, and Central Press also listed numerous honorable mentions.

1965 American Football League draft

The 1965 American Football League draft took place on November 28, 1964. Held via telephone conference call, it remains the only draft in major professional football history to be held without a central location. The NFL draft was held the same day.

1965 NFL Draft

The 1965 National Football League draft was held at the Summit Hotel in New York City on Saturday, November 28, 1964. The first player selected was Tucker Frederickson, back from Auburn, by the New York Giants.The draft was marked by the failure of the St. Louis Cardinals to sign quarterback Joe Namath of Alabama, who went with the New York Jets of the American Football League. The AFL draft was held the same day.

Baylor–TCU football rivalry

The Baylor–TCU football rivalry, also referred to as The Revivalry, is an American college football rivalry between the Baylor Bears and TCU Horned Frogs. The first game of the 113-game series was played in 1899, making the rivalry one of the oldest and most played in FBS college football.

Brownwood High School

Brownwood High School is a public high school located in Brownwood, Texas, United States. It is part of the Brownwood Independent School District located in central Brown County, and is classified as a 4A school by the UIL. In 2015, the school was rated "Met Standard" by the Texas Education Agency.

Elkins (surname)

Elkins is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Aaron Elkins (born 1935), American mystery writer

Caroline Elkins (born 1959), American academic

Carolyn Elkins, American poet, teacher, and editor

Charlotte Elkins (born 1948), American author and wife of writer Aaron Elkins

Corey Elkins (born 1985), left wing for the Los Angeles Kings of the National Hockey League

Dane Elkins (born 1999), American professional racquetball player

Darren Elkins, American mixed martial artist

Davis Elkins (1876–1959), American industrialist, son of Stephen Benton Elkins

Gary Elkins (born 1966), English football player

Gary Elkins (born 1955), American politician

Hillard Elkins ("Hilly" Elkins, born 1929), American theatre and film producer

Jim Elkins (Oregon criminal), crime boss in Portland, Oregon in the mid-20th century

James Elkins (art critic) (born 1954), art critic and art historian based in Chicago

John Elkins (1815-1898), American politician

Larry Elkins (born 1943), former American football player

Luther Elkins (1809–1887), American politician and pioneer in the state of Oregon

Margreta Elkins (1939–2009), Australian opera singer

Mike Elkins (born 1966), former quarterback in the National Football League and the World League of American Football

Bob Elkins (born 1932), American character actor who has appeared in movies, plays and television productions

Stanley Elkins, (1925-2013) American Historian, History Professor, Jewish Nonfiction Author who wrote: “Slavery: a problem in American institutional and intellectual life” and “Age of Federalism”

Stephen Benton Elkins (1841–1911), American industrialist, father of Davis Elkins

Terence James Elkins (born 1936), American physicist

Wilson Homer Elkins (1909–1994), president of the University of Maryland from 1954 to 1978

Harry Schuh

Harry Frederick Schuh (September 25, 1942 – May 20, 2013) was an American football player. He was an All-American tackle at the University of Memphis in 1963 and 1964. He was the third player drafted overall in the 1965 American Football League draft, after Joe Namath and Larry Elkins. He played for the American Football League's Oakland Raiders from 1965 through 1969 as the starting right tackle, winning the AFL Championship in 1967 and playing in the Second AFL-NFL World Championship Game. Schuh was an AFL Western Division All-Star in 1967, an AFL All-League tackle in 1969, and an AFC selection for the AFC-NFC Pro Bowl in 1970 as a member of the NFL's Raiders. But he was traded before the 1971 season for his replacement at right tackle, Bob Brown, an eventual member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Schuh finished his career with the Green Bay Packers. He was a member of the Raiders' All-Time Team.

Schuh died in Memphis, Tennessee on May 20, 2013.

Hula Bowl

The Hula Bowl was an independently administered post-season invitational college football game held annually in Hawaii from 1947 to 2008, usually in January. The game was last played at Aloha Stadium in the Halawa district of Honolulu. At one point the longest-running sporting event in Hawaii, it had been considered a premier venue to launch professional careers in the National Football League (NFL).

Kentucky House of Representatives

The Kentucky House of Representatives is the lower house of the Kentucky General Assembly. It is composed of 100 Representatives elected from single-member districts throughout the Commonwealth. Not more than two counties can be joined to form a House district, except when necessary to preserve the principle of equal representation. Representatives are elected to two-year terms with no term limits. The Kentucky House of Representatives convenes at the State Capitol in Frankfort.

List of American Football League players

The following is a list of men who played for the American Football League (AFL, 1960–1969).

List of Green Bay Packers players

The following is a list of notable past or present players of the Green Bay Packers professional American football team.

List of NCAA major college football yearly receiving leaders

The list of college football yearly receiving leaders identifies the major college receiving leaders for each season from 1937 to the present. It includes yearly leaders in three statistical categories: (1) receptions, (2) receiving yardage; (3) yards per reception; and (4) receiving touchdowns.

Eleven players have led the NCAA in one or more of these categories in multiple seasons. They are: Reid Moseley of Georgia (1944-1945); Hugh Campbell of Washington State (1960-1961); Vern Burke of Oregon State (1962-1963); Howard Twilley of Tulsa (1964-1965); Ron Sellers of Florida State (1967-1968); Jerry Hendren of Idaho (1968-1969); Mike Siani of Villanova (1970-1971); Steve Largent of Tulsa (1974-1975); Jason Phillips of Houston (1987-1988); Alex Van Dyke of Nevada (1994-1995); and Brennan Marion of Tulsa (2007-2008).

Since 1937, the NCAA record for receiving yards in a single season has been set or broken nine times as follows: Jim Benton of Arkansas in 1937 (814 yards); Hank Stanton of Arizona in 1941 (820 yards); Ed Barker of Washington State 1951 (864 yards); Hugh Campbell of Washington State in 1960 (881 yards); Vern Burke of Oregon State in 1962 (1,007 yards); Fred Biletnikoff of Florida State in 1964 (1,179 yards); Howard Twilley of Tulsa in 1965 (1,779 yards); Alex Van Dyke of Nevada in 1995 (1,854 yards); and Trevor Insley of Nevada in 1999 (2,060 yards).

During that same time, the record for receptions in a single season has been set or broken 13 times as follows: Jim Benton of Arkansas in 1937 (48); Hank Stanton of Arizona in 1941 (50); Barney Poole of Ole Miss in 1947 (52); Ed Brown of Fordham in 1952 (57); Dave Hibbert of Arizona in 1958 (61); Hugh Campbell of Washington State in 1962 (69); Larry Elkins of Baylor in 1963 (70); Howard Twilley of Tulsa in 1964 (95) and 1965 (134); Manny Hazard of Houston in 1989 (142); Freddie Barnes of Bowling Green in 2009 (155); and Zay Jones of East Carolina in 2016 (158).

List of Tennessee Titans first-round draft picks

The Tennessee Titans are a National Football League (NFL) franchise that began play as the Houston Oilers in 1960, a charter member of the American Football League. The Oilers relocated to Nashville, Tennessee in 1997, playing as the Tennessee Oilers before changing their name to the Tennessee Titans in 1999. The Titans' first draft selection was Billy Cannon, a halfback from Louisiana State University. The team's most recent first round selection was Marcus Mariota, a quarterback from the University of Oregon. The Titans have selected the number one overall pick in the draft twice. They have also selected the second overall pick thrice and the third overall pick six times. The team's five selections from the University of Texas are the most chosen by the Titans from one university.

Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft known as "the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting", which is more commonly known as the NFL Draft. Teams are ranked in inverse order based on the previous season's record, with the worst record picking first, and the second worst picking second and so on. The two exceptions to this order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion always picks 32nd, and the Super Bowl loser always picks 31st. Teams have the option of trading away their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or a combination thereof. Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.

The Titans drafted three consecutive future Pro Football Hall of Fame inductees, Earl Campbell, Mike Munchak and Bruce Matthews in the first rounds of the 1978, 1982 and 1983 NFL Drafts respectively.

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