Larry Corcoran

Lawrence J. Corcoran (August 10, 1859 – October 14, 1891) was an American pitcher in Major League Baseball. He was born in Brooklyn, New York.[1]

Corcoran debuted in the 1880 season, where he won 43 games and led the Chicago team to the National League championship. Cap Anson alternated him with pitcher Fred Goldsmith, giving Chicago the first true pitching "rotation" in professional baseball.

In 1882, Corcoran became the first pitcher to throw two no-hitters in a career. Two seasons later, he became the first pitcher to throw three no-hitters, setting a record that would stand until 1965, when Sandy Koufax threw his fourth no-hitter. He is also famous for being one of baseball's very few switch-pitchers, and is the only player in MLB history whose batting-throwing combination was "bats left, throws both." A natural righty, Corcoran pitched four innings alternating throwing arms on June 16, 1884, due to the inflammation of his right index finger.[2] He is credited with creating the first method of signaling pitches to his catcher,[2] which consisted of moving a wad of chewing tobacco in his mouth to indicate what pitch would be thrown.[2]

Corcoran's arm was dead by 1885, and by 1887 he was out of the league.

Corcoran, afflicted with Bright's disease, died in Newark, New Jersey at the age of 32.[1] He was interred in the Holy Sepulchre Cemetery in East Orange.[1]

His brother, Mike, pitched in one major league game in 1884.[3]

Larry Corcoran
Larry Corcoran baseball card
Pitcher
Born: August 10, 1859
Brooklyn, New York
Died: October 14, 1891 (aged 32)
Newark, New Jersey
Batted: Left Threw: Switch
MLB debut
May 1, 1880, for the Chicago White Stockings
Last MLB appearance
May 20, 1887, for the Indianapolis Hoosiers
MLB statistics
Win–loss record177–89
Earned run average2.36
Strikeout1,103
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "Larry Corcoran Stats". Baseball-Almanac.com. Retrieved November 15, 2006.
  2. ^ a b c Carroll, Bob. "Larry Corcoran". BaseballLibrary.com. Archived from the original on October 1, 2007. Retrieved November 15, 2006.
  3. ^ "Mike Corcoran". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved November 15, 2006.

External links

Preceded by
John Montgomery Ward
Guy Hecker
Frank Mountain
No-hitter pitcher
August 19, 1880
September 20, 1882
June 27, 1884
Succeeded by
Pud Galvin
Charles Radbourn
Pud Galvin
1880 Chicago White Stockings season

The 1880 Chicago White Stockings season was the 9th season of the Chicago White Stockings franchise, the 5th in the National League and the 3rd at Lakefront Park. The White Stockings won the National League championship with a record of 67–17.

1880 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1880 throughout the world.

1881 Chicago White Stockings season

The 1881 Chicago White Stockings season was the 10th season of the Chicago White Stockings franchise, the 6th in the National League and the 4th at Lakefront Park. The White Stockings won the National League championship with a record of 56–28.

1882 Chicago White Stockings season

The 1882 Chicago White Stockings season was the 11th season of the Chicago White Stockings franchise, the 7th in the National League and the 5th at Lakefront Park. The White Stockings won the National League championship with a record of 55–29, 3 games ahead of the second place Providence Grays.

1882 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1882 throughout the world.

1883 Chicago White Stockings season

The 1883 Chicago White Stockings season was the 12th season of the Chicago White Stockings franchise, the 8th in the National League and the 6th at Lakefront Park. The White Stockings finished second in the National League with a record of 59–39.

1884 Chicago White Stockings season

The 1884 Chicago White Stockings season was the 13th season of the Chicago White Stockings franchise, the 9th in the National League and the 7th at Lakefront Park. The White Stockings finished fifth in the National League with a record of 62–50. White Stocking 3rd baseman, Ned Williamson set the then major league single season home run record with 27 home runs.

1885 Chicago White Stockings season

The 1885 Chicago White Stockings season was the 14th season of the Chicago White Stockings franchise, the 10th in the National League and the 1st at the first West Side Park. The White Stockings won the National League pennant for the first time since 1882, beating the New York Giants by two games. They went on to face the St. Louis Browns in the 1885 World Series. The series ended without a champion, with both teams winning three games with one tie.

1885 New York Giants season

The 1885 New York Giants season was the franchise's 3rd season. The team finished in second place, 2 games behind the Chicago White Stockings.

1886 Washington Nationals season

The 1886 Washington Nationals finished with a 28–92 record in the National League, finishing in last place in their debut season.

1887 Indianapolis Hoosiers season

The 1887 Indianapolis Hoosiers finished with a 37–89 record in the National League, finishing in last place in their first season in Indianapolis. They had played the previous three seasons in St. Louis, Missouri as the Maroons.

Charlie Guth

Charles J. Guth (1856 in Chicago – July 5, 1883 in Cambridge, Massachusetts) was a professional baseball player who played pitcher in the Major Leagues in 1880. He played one game for the Chicago White Stockings.

Guth was a semi-professional player who was called up to pitch due to both Larry Corcoran and Fred Goldsmith being ill.

Chicago Browns/Pittsburgh Stogies

The Chicago Browns/Pittsburgh Stogies (also known as Chicago/Pittsburgh) were a short-lived professional baseball team in the Union Association of 1884. They were to battle the Chicago White Stockings, of the National League, for the Chicago baseball market; however, the Browns lost that battle to the White Stockings. After a Baltimore mattress maker gave the club a degree of financial support, the Browns then tried to entice the White Stockings' Larry Corcoran, one of the 1880s top pitchers, to join the team. However, the club did not succeed in doing so. The Chicago Browns disbanded after a game on August 22, 1884. The club then moved to Pittsburgh and became the Stogies, which disbanded after a game played on September 18, 1884. Many of the club's players then joined the Baltimore Monumentals. Altogether, they won 41 games, lost 50 (including one forfeit), and tied 2, finishing sixth in the twelve-team league.

While in Chicago, they played their home games at the first South Side Park. After they moved to Pittsburgh, their home games were played at Exposition Park, which was located in Allegheny, Pennsylvania.

The Union Association officially folded on January 15, 1885 after only one season in existence.

List of Chicago Cubs Opening Day starting pitchers

The Chicago Cubs are a Major League Baseball franchise based in Chicago that plays in the National League Central division. In the history of the franchise, it has also played under the names Chicago White Stockings, Chicago Colts and Chicago Orphans. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The Cubs have used 68 different starting pitchers on Opening Day since they first became a Major League team in 1876. The Cubs have a record of 74 wins, 60 losses and 2 ties in their Opening Day games.

The Cubs have played in seven different home ball parks. They have played at their current home, Wrigley Field, since 1916. They have a record of 22 wins, 21 losses and 1 tie in Opening Day games at Wrigley Field. They had an Opening Day record of six wins, one loss and one tie at their other home ball parks, for a total home record in Opening Day games of 28 wins, 22 losses and 2 ties. Their record in Opening Day away games is 46 wins and 38 losses.

Ferguson Jenkins holds the Cubs record for most Opening Day starts with seven, in which his record was two wins, two losses and three no decisions. Carlos Zambrano has made six Opening Day starts. Larry Corcoran, Clark Griffith, Grover Cleveland Alexander, Charlie Root and Rick Sutcliffe have each made five Opening Day starts for the Cubs. Orval Overall, Lon Warneke, Bob Rush, Larry Jackson and Rick Reuschel each made four Opening Day starts for the Cubs, and Bill Hutchinson, Jon Lieber, Claude Passeau, Jack Taylor and Hippo Vaughn each made three such starts.

Five Cubs' Opening Day starting pitchers have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame: Griffith, Alexander, Jenkins, Al Spalding and John Clarkson. In addition, 300–game winner Greg Maddux was the Cubs' Opening Day starting pitcher in 1992. The Cubs have won the modern World Series championship twice, in 1907 and 1908. Overall was the Cubs' Opening Day starting pitcher both seasons, and the Cubs won both of those Opening Day games. Don Cardwell was the Cubs' Opening Day starting pitcher against the Houston Colt .45s on April 10, 1962, the first game in Houston's history. The Cubs lost the game by a score of 11–2.

List of Chicago Cubs no-hitters

The Chicago Cubs are a Major League Baseball franchise based in Chicago. They play in the National League Central division. Also known in their early years as the "Chicago White Stockings" (1876–89), "Chicago Colts" (1890–97), and "Chicago Orphans" (1898–1902), pitchers for the Cubs have thrown 15 no-hitters in franchise history. A no-hitter is officially recognized by Major League Baseball only "when a pitcher (or pitchers) allows no hits during the entire course of a game, which consists of at least nine innings". No-hitters of fewer than nine complete innings were previously recognized by the league as official; however, several rule alterations in 1991 changed the rule to its current form.No Cubs pitcher has yet pitched a perfect game. The closest performance came on September 2, 1972, when Milt Pappas lost his perfect game bid against the San Diego Padres with two outs in the ninth by allowing a walk to Larry Stahl on a 3–2 count; he retired the next batter to finish the no-hitter. During that at-bat, he was ahead of the batter with a 0–2 count before throwing four straight close pitches to allow the walk.

Larry Corcoran threw the first no-hitter in Cubs history on August 19, 1880; the most recent no-hitter was thrown by Jake Arrieta on April 21, 2016. Two left-handed pitchers have thrown no-hitters in franchise history while nine were by right-handers. Corcoran, Arrieta, and Ken Holtzman are the only pitchers in Cubs history to throw more than one no-hitter. Corcoran threw three and Arrieta and Holtzman threw two.

On July 31, 1910, King Cole of the Cubs pitched all seven innings in a 4–0 win over the St. Louis Cardinals, without giving up a hit. The second game of a doubleheader, the teams had agreed to end the game at 5 p.m. so they could catch their trains. Due to a 1991 change to the official MLB definition of a no-hitter—it must last at least nine innings—Cole's effort is not recognized by as a no-hitter by MLB and does not appear on the below list.Ten no-hitters were thrown at home and five on the road. Two occurred in April, two in May, two in June, one in July, five in August, and three in September. A different umpire presided over each of the franchise's 15 no-hitters. Nine different managers led the team during the franchise's 15 no-hitters.

The longest interval between no-hitters was between the games pitched by Jimmy Lavender and Sam Jones, encompassing 39 years, 8 months, and 12 days from August 31, 1915, until May 12, 1955. The shortest interval in days between no-hitters was between the games pitched by Burt Hooton and Milt Pappas, encompassing four months and sixteen days from April 16, 1972, until September 2, 1972. The shortest interval in games between no-hitters was between the games pitched by Jake Arrieta on August 30, 2015, and April 21, 2016, 49 regular-season games. (The Cubs also played nine postseason games in October 2015, between these two no-hitters.)Cubs pitchers have thrown two no-hitters against the Atlanta Braves and their predecessors – one by Corcoran in 1880 and one by Holtzman in 1969. They also threw two no-hitters against the Cincinnati Reds: Holtzman in 1971, Arrieta in 2016.

The Cubs have not allowed a run in any of their no-hitters. The most baserunners allowed in a no-hitter was seven each by Jones (in 1955) and Hooton (in 1972). Of the fifteen no-hitters, four have been won by a score of 4–0, more than any other score. The largest margin of victory in a no-hitter (and the largest margin of victory in an MLB no-hitter since 1900) was a 16–0 win by Arrieta in 2016. The smallest margin of victory was a 1–0 win by Holtzman in 1971.

In the 1990 film Taking Care of Business, the no-hitters thrown by Burt Hooton and Milt Pappas during the 1972 season are the subject of a radio trivia contest that sets up the film's plot, which features the Cubs playing in the World Series.

Mike Corcoran (baseball)

Michael Corcoran (October 10, 1858 – October 11, 1927) was a Major League Baseball pitcher who played for the Chicago White Stockings (later renamed Chicago Cubs) of the National League. He started one game for the White Stockings on July 15, 1884 in a game against the Detroit Wolverines at Recreation Park. He pitched all 9 innings for a complete game but gave up 16 hits and 14 runs, 4 of which were earned, and was charged with the loss in a 14–0 defeat. He also struck out 2 batters. His brother, Larry Corcoran, was also a Chicago White Stockings pitcher, and was Mike's teammate in 1884. Larry Corcoran pitched both the game before and the game after Mike Corcoran's start, giving the Corcoran brothers three consecutive starts.

Pud Galvin

James Francis "Pud" Galvin (December 25, 1856 – March 7, 1902) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher in the 19th century. He was MLB's first 300-game winner and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1965.

Putout

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by one of the following methods:

Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout)

Catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a force out)

Catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play

Catching a third strike (a strikeout)

Catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout)

Being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference

Switch pitcher

In baseball, a switch-pitcher is an ambidextrous pitcher who is able to pitch with both the right and left hand from the pitcher's mound.

Four 19th-century pitchers are known to have thrown with both hands: Tony Mullane in 1882 and in 1893, Elton Chamberlain in 1888, Larry Corcoran in 1884, and George Wheeler.Greg A. Harris was one of few major league pitchers in the modern era to pitch with both his left and his right arm, though he only did so in a single Major League game. A natural right-hander, by 1986 he could throw well enough left-handed that he felt capable of pitching with either arm in a game. Harris did not throw left-handed in a regular-season game until September 28, 1995, the penultimate game of his career. Pitching for the Montreal Expos against the Cincinnati Reds in the ninth inning, Harris retired Reggie Sanders pitching right-handed, then switched to his left hand for the next two hitters, Hal Morris and Eddie Taubensee, who were both left-handed batters. Harris walked Morris but got Taubensee to ground out. He then went back to his right hand to retire Bret Boone to end the inning.

Pat Venditte regularly pitches with both arms. Venditte was drafted by the New York Yankees, played for the Seattle Mariners, Toronto Blue Jays, Philadelphia Phillies, Oakland Athletics and now plays for the Los Angeles Dodgers. While with the Staten Island Yankees, the Yankees' Single-A affiliate, when he opposed switch hitter Ralph Henriquez, Venditte switched his modified glove to his left arm. (Hitters traditionally derive advantages from batting from the opposite side of the plate to the pitcher's throwing arm.) Henriquez then switched to batting left-handed, and a series of changes continued for several minutes. This prompted the PBUC (Professional Baseball Umpires Corporation) to issue a new rule about switch-pitching. In short, switch-pitchers must indicate to the umpire, batter, and any runners the hand with which they will use to pitch. The pitcher must continue using this hand for the duration of the at bat, with some exceptions for injury and the use of pinch hitters. Following this choice, batters can then select with which hand they will bat. Right-handed pitcher Yu Darvish throws with his left hand when training. He does this to keep both arms strong and balanced. He does not pitch left-handed during a game, however.

In 2003, the Atlanta Braves drafted switch pitcher Brandon Berdoll of Temple (Texas) Junior College in the 27th round. He never made it to the major leagues.

In the collegiate ranks, Matt Brunnig (Harvard class of 2006–07) was able to pitch over 85 mph left-handed and over 90 mph right-handed, but only pitched with both arms in the same game a few times. In college, he pitched more from the right side as a starter and pitched some relief as a lefty although he did start one game left-handed. When playing the outfield after a start he would typically play the position with the other arm to rest the arm he just pitched with.Switch-throwers are commonly taught to switch-throw at a young age. For instance, Venditte's father trained him in ambidextrous throwing from the age of three and Brunnig's father taught him from age five.

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.