Larry Buhler

Lawrence "Larry" Abraham Buhler (May 28, 1917 – August 21, 1990) was a fullback/halfback in the National Football League who played 21 games for the Green Bay Packers. He played for the University of Minnesota Golden Gophers under Bernie Bierman.[1] In 1939, the Green Bay Packers used the 9th pick in the 1st round of the 1939 NFL Draft to sign Buhler out of the University of Minnesota. Buhler played for three seasons with the Packers and retired in 1941. Buhler ended his working career as the manager of the municipal liquor store in Windom, Minnesota.[2] He worked as assistant manager and manager for 16 years and 8 months before retiring at the end of 1983.[2] A statue of Buhler was erected on the grounds of the Cottonwood County Courthouse and was dedicated in 1993.[1]

Larry Buhler
refer to caption
Larry Buhler in his University of Minnesota sweater
Position:Fullback / Halfback
Personal information
Born:May 28, 1917
Mountain Lake, Minnesota
Died:August 21, 1990 (aged 73)
Rochester, Minnesota
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:210 lb (95 kg)
Career information
High school:Windom (MN)
College:Minnesota
NFL Draft:1939 / Round: 1 / Pick: 9
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

References

  1. ^ a b "Bronze statue honors Windom pro footballer". Daily Globe. April 1, 2010. Archived from the original on February 15, 2013. Retrieved August 14, 2012.
  2. ^ a b City of Windom Resolution #2-84

External links

1937 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1937 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams chosen by various selectors for the 1937 Big Ten Conference football season.

1938 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1938 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams selected by the Associated Press (AP) and United Press (UP) for the 1938 Big Ten Conference football season.

1938 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1938 Big Ten Conference football season was the 43rd season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1938 college football season.

The Big Ten Conference championship went to Bernie Bierman's 1938 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team. Minnesota compiled a 6–2 record, outscored its opponents 97 to 38, and was ranked No. 10 in the final AP Poll. Guard Frank Twedell was a first-team All-American. Twedell and quarterback Wilbur Moore were first-team picks for the All-Big Ten team.

Michigan, in its first year under head coach Fritz Crisler, compiled a 6–1–1 record, outscored opponents 131 to 40, led the conference in scoring offense (16.4 points per game), and was ranked No. 16 in the final AP Poll. The team's only setbacks were a 7-6 loss to Minnesota and a scoreless tie with Northwestern. Michigan guard Ralph Heikkinen was a consensus first-team All-American. Sophomore backs Tom Harmon and Forest Evashevski were both first-team All-Big Ten players.

Northwestern, under head coach Pappy Waldorf, compiled a 4–2–2 record, outscored opponents 93 to 32, led the conference in scoring defense (4.0 points per game), and was ranked No. 17 in the final AP Poll. Tackle Bob Voigts was a first-team All-American.

Wisconsin fullback Howard Weiss received the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the most valuable player in the conference. Ralph Heikkinen finished in second place in the voting and Larry Buhler of Minnesota was third.

1938 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1938 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1938 Big Ten Conference football season. In their seventh year under head coach Bernie Bierman, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–2 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 97 to 38.Guard Frank Twedell was named an All-American by the Associated Press and United Press. Twedell and quarterback Wilbur Moore were named All-Big Ten first team.Fullback Larry Buhler was awarded the Team MVP Award.Total attendance for the season was 237,000, which averaged to 47,400. The season high for attendance was against Michigan.

1939 Green Bay Packers season

The 1939 Green Bay Packers season was their 21st season overall and their 19th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 9–2 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a first-place finish in the Western Conference. The Packers ended the season by beating the New York Giants in the NFL Championship Game 27–0, earning the Packers their fifth NFL Championship and the first title game shutout ever recorded.

1939 NFL Draft

The 1939 National Football League Draft was held on December 9, 1938, at the New Yorker Hotel in New York City, New York.

1940 Green Bay Packers season

The 1940 Green Bay Packers season was their 22nd season overall and their 20th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–4–1 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning them a second-place finish in the Western Conference.

Green Bay Packers draft history

This page is a list of the Green Bay Packers NFL Draft selections. The Packers have participated in every NFL draft since it began in 1936, in which they made Russ Letlow their first-ever selection.

List of Green Bay Packers first-round draft picks

The Green Bay Packers joined the National Football League (NFL) in 1921, two years after their original founding by Curly Lambeau. They participated in the first ever NFL draft in 1936 and selected Russ Letlow, a guard from the University of San Francisco. The team's most recent first round selection was Jaire Alexander, a cornerback from Louisville in the 2018 NFL Draft. The Packers have selected the number one overall pick in the draft twice, choosing future Hall of Fame halfback Paul Hornung in 1957 and quarterback Randy Duncan in 1959. They have also selected the second overall pick three times and the third overall pick once. The team's eight selections from the University of Minnesota are the most chosen by the Packers from one university.

Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft officially known as "the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting" but more commonly known as the NFL Draft. Teams are ranked in inverse order based on the previous season's record, with the worst record picking first, and the second worst picking second and so on. The two exceptions to this order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion always picks 32nd, and the Super Bowl loser always picks 31st. Playoff teams will not pick before a non playoff team when determining the initial draft order. So a division winner with a losing record would have a lower pick after a 10-6 team that didn't make the playoffs. Teams have the option of trading away their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or a combination thereof. Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.

List of Green Bay Packers players

The following is a list of notable past or present players of the Green Bay Packers professional American football team.

List of Minnesota Golden Gophers in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Minnesota Golden Gophers football players in the NFL Draft.

Minnesota Golden Gophers football annual team awards

These are the Minnesota Golden Gophers annual team award recipients.

Windom, Minnesota

Windom is a city in Cottonwood County, Minnesota, United States. The population was 4,646 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Cottonwood County and is situated in the Coteau des Prairies.

Although it is a small, rural farming community, Windom is host to several parks including a newly installed disc golf course at Mayflower Park. The Des Moines River flows through Windom and serves as a gentle, rapid-free canoeing spot.

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