Lamprey River

The Lamprey River is a 50.2-mile-long (80.8 km)[1] river in southeastern New Hampshire, the United States. It rises in Meadow Lake in Northwood, and flows south, then generally east through Raymond, Epping, Lee, Durham and finally Newmarket. Here, it meets Great Bay, a tidal inlet of the Atlantic Ocean, to which it is connected by a tidal estuary, the Piscataqua River. The river from the Bunker Pond Dam in Epping to the confluence with the Piscassic River is part of the designated National Wild and Scenic River System.

Coordinates: 43°03′54″N 70°54′18″W / 43.0651°N 70.9049°W

Lamprey River
Lamprey River, Newmarket NH 6
Lamprey River in Newmarket, New Hampshire
Location
CountryUnited States
StateNew Hampshire
DistrictRockingham County
MunicipalitiesRaymond, Epping, Newmarket
Physical characteristics
SourceMeadow Lake
 ⁃ locationNorthwood
 ⁃ coordinates43°12′3″N 71°12′19″W / 43.20083°N 71.20528°W
 ⁃ elevation594 ft (181 m)
MouthGreat Bay
 ⁃ location
Newmarket
 ⁃ coordinates
43°3′54″N 70°54′20″W / 43.06500°N 70.90556°W
 ⁃ elevation
0 ft (0 m)
Length50.2 mi (80.8 km)[1]
Basin features
Tributaries 
 ⁃ leftPawtuckaway River, North River, Little River
 ⁃ rightNorth Branch River, Piscassic River
TypeRecreational
DesignatedNovember 12, 1996
Lamprey River, Epping, NH
Lamprey River c. 1920, Epping, New Hampshire

Wildlife

The shoreline of the Lamprey River, its floodplain and its wetlands provide a wide range of valuable wildlife habitats. Its anadromous fishery is one of the strongest in the Great Bay watershed. Anadromous fish species that use the Lamprey River include shad, river herring, smelt and even Atlantic salmon. These fish are hatched in the river, then spend most of their lives out at sea, returning to the river to spawn. The fish species will move up the river as far as Durham, where they are prevented from moving further upstream by Wiswall Dam.

The river is also rich in species of freshwater mussels. The river is managed by the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department for several different types of game fish, including brook trout which is native to the river. Rainbow trout and brown trout are also stocked in many parts of the river but are not native to the area.

Lampreys are also present in the river. However, the Lamprey River derives its name from an early settler, John Lamprey, who lived in the area,[2] rather than the fish itself.

History

Segments of the river are rich in history. Saw- and gristmills which operated by water power were common along the river. The Wiswall Falls Mills Site in Durham is on the National Register of Historic Places. Originally a sawmill, the site was used subsequently to make knives, nuts and bolts, pitchforks, carriages, matches and wallpaper. Sites such as Wadleigh Falls show the remnants of old mills and the rich river culture that used to be. Wadleigh Falls, located in Lee, is the remains of a dam created to power a mill which fed a 150-acre (61 ha) mill pond at one point.

Setting

Along the banks are hardwood forests and numerous farms. The area is under pressure from suburban development as one of the fastest-growing areas in New England. There is a strong local culture surrounding the Lamprey River with several local events held on the river, including numerous town-run fishing derbies and the Lamprey River Canoe Race held annually in Epping.

During the course of its journey from the Saddleback Mountains in Northwood down to Newmarket, the Lamprey changes from a small torrential stream to a large tidal river. The river between these points has slow meanders and rapids, and small waterfalls such as Packers Falls in Durham.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b NH GRANIT database Archived 2013-08-03 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ "Community Profiles: Newmarket, NH". NH Economic & Labor Market Information Bureau. Retrieved September 25, 2017.

External links

Bean River

The Bean River is a 7.4-mile (11.9 km) long river located in southeastern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the North River, part of the Lamprey River/Great Bay/Piscataqua River watershed leading to the Atlantic Ocean.

The river rises near the summit of Saddleback Mountain on the border between Northwood and Deerfield. The river flows southeast through Deerfield and quickly enters Nottingham, where it picks up the north outlet of Pawtuckaway Lake shortly before joining the North River one mile north of Nottingham village.

Epping, New Hampshire

Epping is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 6,411 at the 2010 census.The primary settlement in town, where 1,681 people resided at the 2010 census, is defined by the U.S. Census Bureau as the Epping census-designated place (CDP) and includes the densely populated portion of the town centered on New Hampshire Route 27 just west of New Hampshire Route 125.

Fresh River (New Hampshire)

The Fresh River is a 3.2-mile (5.1 km) long stream in southeastern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Piscassic River, which flows into the Lamprey River and is part of the Great Bay and Piscataqua River watershed leading to the Atlantic Ocean.

Nearly the entire course of the river is through freshwater wetlands. The vertical drop of the stream over its three-mile length is less than 20 feet. It rises on the border between the towns of Epping and Brentwood and flows east into the northern corner of Exeter. The river crosses into Newfields just before joining the Piscassic River at the Piscassic Ice Pond.

Lamprey (disambiguation)

A lamprey is a parasitic aquatic vertebrate with a toothed, funnel-like sucking mouth.

Lamprey may refer to:

Lamprey (surname)

Lamprey River, a river in southeastern New Hampshire, U.S.

Lamprey (comics), a character from Marvel Comics' original Squadron Supreme series

Lamprey (G.I. Joe), a set of fictional characters in the G.I. Joe universe

Lamprey (album), an album by Bettie Serveert

USS Lamprey (SS-372), a Balao-class submarine of the United States Navy

Lamprey, a Beast General character in Shadow Raiders

Lamprey, a character in A Trick to Catch the Old One

Lamprey, Manitoba, an unincorporated place in Manitoba, Canada

Lamprey railway station in Lamprey, Manitoba, Canada

List of rivers of New Hampshire

This is a list of rivers and significant streams in the U.S. state of New Hampshire.

All watercourses named "River" (freshwater or tidal) are listed here, as well as other streams which are either subject to the New Hampshire Comprehensive Shoreland Protection Act or are more than 10 miles (16 km) long. New Hampshire rivers and streams qualify for state shoreland protection (and are listed here in bold) if they are fourth-order or larger water bodies, based on the Strahler method of stream order classification.

Little River (Lamprey River tributary)

The Little River is a 10.4 mile long (16.7 km) river located in southeastern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Lamprey River, part of the Great Bay and Piscataqua River watershed leading to the Atlantic Ocean.

The river rises in Barrington, New Hampshire as a tributary of Mendums Pond. Upon leaving Mendums Pond, the river enters Nottingham, flowing south through Nottingham Lake and then east, where it joins the Lamprey River near the town center of Lee.

Little River (New Hampshire)

The Little River in New Hampshire may refer to:

Little River (Ammonoosuc River), a tributary of the Ammonoosuc River

Little River (Big River), a tributary of the Big River

Little River (Brentwood, New Hampshire), a tributary of the Exeter River

Little River (Exeter, New Hampshire), another tributary of the Exeter River

Little River (Lamprey River), a tributary of the Lamprey River

Little River (Merrimack River) in New Hampshire and Massachusetts, a tributary of the Merrimack River

Little River (New Hampshire Atlantic coast), in the Seacoast region of New Hampshire

Mendum's Pond

Mendums Pond (occasionally spelled Mendum's Pond) is a 253-acre (1.02 km2) reservoir located primarily in Strafford County in eastern New Hampshire, United States, in the town of Barrington. Its extreme southern end dips into the town of Nottingham in Rockingham County. The pond is located on the Little River, a tributary of the Lamprey River and part of the larger Piscataqua River watershed.

Like nearby Pawtuckaway Lake, Mendums Pond was created to ensure a consistent water supply for the Newmarket Manufacturing Company, a water powered cotton textile manufacturer founded in 1822. During drought, a regulated flow would be released from the dam to run mills downriver in Newmarket.

The University of New Hampshire owns 187.6 acres (0.8 km2) of forestland on Mendums Pond. Arthur W. McDaniel donated a small parcel to the college in 1930, then the remainder in 1970. Located at the shoreline is the UNH Sailing Club, which holds intra-collegiate races, with the rest of the property divided into areas for recreation, wildlife and timber harvesting.The pond is classified as a warm water fishery, with observed species including smallmouth and largemouth bass, chain pickerel, and horned pout.

Newmarket, New Hampshire

Newmarket is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 8,936 at the 2010 census. Some residents are students and employees at the nearby University of New Hampshire in Durham.

The primary settlement in town, where 5,297 people resided at the 2010 census, is defined as the Newmarket census-designated place, or CDP, and is located at the junction of New Hampshire routes 108 and 152, along the Lamprey River.

Newmarket (CDP), New Hampshire

Newmarket is a census-designated place (CDP) and the main village in the town of Newmarket in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population of the CDP was 5,297 at the 2010 census, out of 8,936 people in the entire town of Newmarket.

North Branch River

The North Branch River is an 8.2-mile (13.2 km) long river in southeastern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Lamprey River, part of the Great Bay and Piscataqua River watershed leading to the Atlantic Ocean.

The river begins in Bear Brook State Park, in Deerfield, New Hampshire, at the outlet to Beaver Pond. Flowing southeast, it quickly leaves the park, then enters the town of Candia. It passes under New Hampshire Route 43 just south of the village of Candia, then reaches NH 27 just before entering the town of Raymond, where the river ends at the Lamprey River.

North River (New Hampshire)

The North River is a 15.1-mile (24.3 km) long river located in southeastern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Lamprey River, part of the Great Bay and Piscataqua River watershed leading to the Atlantic Ocean.

The river begins at the outlet of North River Pond in the northern corner of Nottingham, New Hampshire. It flows southeast through hilly, wooded terrain, crossing the entire town of Nottingham, the southwest corner of Lee, and a northern part of Epping, where it joins the Lamprey. A major tributary of the North River is the Bean River, which joins from the west in the center part of Nottingham.

Pawtuckaway Lake

Pawtuckaway Lake (official name Pawtuckaway Pond) is a 784-acre (3.17 km2) reservoir in Rockingham County in southeastern New Hampshire, United States, in the town of Nottingham. The lake is located in the Piscataqua River drainage basin.

The original, natural pond was enlarged in the 18th and 19th centuries by the construction of dams and dikes. In the lake's present configuration has two dams and three dikes. The dam on the southern end of the lake, Dolloff Dam, feeds the Pawtuckaway River, which flows southeast to the Lamprey River in the western part of the town of Epping. The dam at the north end of the lake, Drown's Dam, releases water to the Bean River, leading to the North River and ultimately the Lamprey River in the northern part of Epping.

Approximately half of the lake's shoreline consists of private homes, a mixture of seasonal and year-round residents. Most of the western side of Pawtuckaway Lake is occupied by Pawtuckaway State Park, a popular camping, swimming, boating, hiking, bouldering, and orienteering destination. Canoe orienteering events are held on the lake.

Pawtuckaway River

The Pawtuckaway River is a 3.6-mile (5.8 km) long river in southeastern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Lamprey River, part of the Great Bay and Piscataqua River watershed leading to the Atlantic Ocean.

The river forms the south outlet of Pawtuckaway Lake, a 900-acre (360 ha) lake in the town of Nottingham, New Hampshire. The river travels southeast through a wooded valley, passing under New Hampshire Route 156, entering the town of Raymond briefly, then crossing into Epping, where it joins the Lamprey River near the village of West Epping.

Piscassic River

The Piscassic River is a 15.3-mile (24.6 km) long river located in southeastern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Lamprey River, part of the Great Bay and Piscataqua River watershed leading to the Atlantic Ocean.The river rises in the northeast corner of Fremont and flows east across flat, swampy terrain through the town of Epping. Upon reaching the town of Newfields, where it is joined by the Fresh River, the river turns northeast and winds through rolling terrain to Newmarket, where it reaches the Lamprey River. The Fresh River joins the Piscassic just upstream from the Piscassic Ice Pond in a marshy area of beaver ponds.

Raymond, New Hampshire

Raymond is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 10,138 at the 2010 census, and the estimated population in 2017 was 10,376. Part of Pawtuckaway State Park is in the north.

The central village in town, where 2,855 people resided at the 2010 census, is defined as the Raymond census-designated place (CDP), and is located along the Lamprey River near New Hampshire Route 27.

Raymond (CDP), New Hampshire

Raymond is a census-designated place (CDP) and the primary village in the town of Raymond in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population of the CDP was 2,855 at the 2010 census, out of 10,138 people in the entire town of Raymond.

Squamscott River

The Squamscott River is a 6-mile-long (9.7 km) tidal river in Rockingham County, southeastern New Hampshire, in the United States. It rises at Exeter, fed by the Exeter River. The Squamscott runs north between Newfields and Stratham to Great Bay, a tidal estuary, which is connected to the Piscataqua River, a tidal inlet of the Atlantic Ocean.

More specifically, after rising at the Great Bridge (actually a very modest Works Progress Administration project) adjacent to the former "Loaf & Ladle" restaurant in downtown Exeter, the Squamscott River passes the "Wooden Wave" (an interesting architectural statement next to the Phillips Exeter Academy boathouse), then tends north alongside the Swasey Parkway, through the haymarshes, passing by the town's water purification plant and then under State Route 101, a major east-west arterial road in New Hampshire. The river next passes under Route 108 at the site of the former "Singing Bridge", a metal bridge which was recently replaced. The river then debouches into Great Bay, a broad and shallow tidal estuary, just south of the mouth of the Lamprey River, arriving at the bay from Newmarket.

The Squamscott, also spelled Swampscott and Swamscott, gets its name from the Squamscott Indians who called it Msquam-s-kook (or Msquamskek) translated as 'at the salmon place' or 'big water place.' Plentiful game, the marshes and lush river-fed vegetation, and an abundance of fish supported the northeast Native American Indians who were present in the region for thousands of years until English settlers displaced them in the early 17th century. The Native American tribes of New Hampshire were most likely from the Abenaki nation, but independent of the Maine-based tribes. The name “Abenaki” and its derivatives originated from a Montagnais (Algonquin) word meaning "people of the dawn" or "easterners". In the eastern part of New Hampshire were the Pequaquaukes (or Pequakets), the Ossipees, the Minnecometts, the Piscataquas and the Squamscotts (Msquamskek).

The Phillips Exeter Academy crew team holds its practices on the Squamscott River in Exeter.

Wiswall Falls Mills Site

The Wiswall Falls Mill Site (site 27-ST-38) is a historic archaeological industrial site in Durham, New Hampshire. It is located in John Hatch Park, a small public park just south of Wiswall Road on the eastern bank of the Lamprey River. The 3-acre (1.2 ha) site encompasses the remains of a small 19th-century mill complex that was one of Durham's major industrial sites of the 19th century until it burned in 1883. The site, which includes remains of the waterworks and foundations, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

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