Lakeville, Massachusetts

Lakeville is a town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 10,602 at the 2010 census.[1]

For geographic and demographic information on the village of North Lakeville, please see the article North Lakeville, Massachusetts.

Lakeville, Massachusetts
Assawompset Pond, Lakeville
Assawompset Pond, Lakeville
Official seal of Lakeville, Massachusetts

Seal
Location in Plymouth County in Massachusetts
Location in Plymouth County in Massachusetts
Coordinates: 41°50′45″N 70°57′00″W / 41.84583°N 70.95000°WCoordinates: 41°50′45″N 70°57′00″W / 41.84583°N 70.95000°W
CountryUnited States
StateMassachusetts
CountyPlymouth
Settled1717
IncorporatedMay 13, 1853
Government
 • TypeOpen town meeting
Area
 • Total36.1 sq mi (93.6 km2)
 • Land29.6 sq mi (76.6 km2)
 • Water6.6 sq mi (17.0 km2)
Elevation
90 ft (27 m)
Population
 (2017)
 • Total11,424
 • Density320/sq mi (120/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (Eastern)
ZIP code
02347
Area code(s)508 / 774
FIPS code25-33920
GNIS feature ID0618344
Websitewww.lakevillema.org

History

Lakeville MA Ancient House
Ancient House in Lakeville

Lakeville was settled in 1717 as a western parish of Middleborough. It was incorporated as a separate town in 1853. The town's name comes from the system of lakes in the town, including Assawompset Pond, Great Quittacas Pond, Little Quittacas Pond, Pocksha Pond, and Long Pond. Long Pond is the source of the Acushnet River, and Assawompsett Pond is the source of the Nemasket River, which feeds the Taunton River. Ocean Spray is headquartered in Lakeville. Lakeville is also commonly referred to as "The Promised Land."

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 36.1 square miles (93.6 km2), of which 29.6 square miles (76.6 km2) is land and 6.6 square miles (17.0 km2), or 18.17%, is water.[2] Lakeville is irregularly shaped, bordered by Middleborough to the northeast and east, Rochester to the southeast, Freetown to the south and southwest, and Berkley and Taunton to the west. Its borders with Taunton, Berkley and Freetown are also a central section of the western borders of Plymouth County. Lakeville is roughly at the center of what is considered Southeastern Massachusetts, and is approximately 20 miles (32 km) west of Plymouth, 20 miles (32 km) north of New Bedford, 30 miles (48 km) east of Providence, Rhode Island, and 40 miles (64 km) south of Boston.

The town's geography is dominated by its namesake lakes, which are referred to as "ponds" in general usage. In addition to the main bodies of water and their feeder brooks and rivers, there are also several smaller ponds, as well as many brooks and swamps, including the Casual Swamp and the Cedar Swamp, which is protected as a part of the Assonet Cedar Swamp Wildlife Management Area, which is operated by the Massachusetts Audubon Society. There are also several small conservation areas, four country clubs and two parks, including the Ted Williams Camp, which was once the site of a summer baseball camp run by Ted Williams. According to "Lakeville, Massachusetts Gravestone Inscriptions 1711-2003" by Jean Douillette, there are 31 known cemeteries in Lakeville, or almost 1 per square mile.

The body of John Sassamon, advisor to Governor Josiah Winslow, was discovered beneath the ice of Assawompsett Pond. He was believed to have been murdered, and three Native Americans were arrested. On the testimony of only one witness (contrary to English law, which required the testimony of at least two witnesses in a murder trial), the three were sentenced to death by hanging. When the sentence was carried out, Tobias, senior counselor to the Pokanoket sachem King Philip, and a second supposed accomplice died. When the attempt was made to carry out the sentence on the third "accomplice" - Tobias's son - the rope broke and he was imprisoned, having first confessed to the killings. His confession is widely believed to have been coerced.

The death of John Sassamon and the subsequent trial and execution of the Native Americans - while not the cause of King Philip's War and the bloodshed that followed - nonetheless probably contributed to the ardor of the participants.

Demographics

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 9,821 people, 3,292 households, and 2,659 families residing in the town. The population density was 328.4 people per square mile (126.8/km²). There were 3,662 housing units at an average density of 122.5 per square mile (47.3/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 97.29% White, 0.31% African American, 0.14% Native American, 0.59% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.50% from other races, and 1.16% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.06% of the population.

The most common ancestries in Lakeville are: Irish (23.2%), English (20.1%), French (12.9%), Italian (11.9%), Portuguese (11.4%) and French Canadian (10.1%). 3.8% of Lakeville's residents are foreign-born.[13]

There were 3,292 households out of which 40.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 69.7% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.2% were non-families. 14.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.91 and the average family size was 3.24.

In the town, the population was spread out with 27.4% under the age of 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 31.1% from 25 to 44, 24.4% from 45 to 64, and 11.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.1 males. Of the population 25 years and older in Lakeville, 87.2% have a high school degree or higher. 32.7% of this demographic group has a bachelor's degree or higher. 11% of Lakeville residents 25 years or older have a graduate or professional degree. The average person's commute to work is 33.8 minutes and 2.6% of the town's population above the age of 25 is unemployed.[2]

The median income for a household in the town was $70,495, and the median income for a family was $75,838. Males had a median income of $51,321 versus $31,374 for females. The per capita income for the town was $26,046. About 1.9% of families and 3.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.8% of those under age 18 and 8.5% of those age 65 or over.

Lakeville's median household income and the medium house value are above the Massachusetts state average.[13]

Government

Lakeville MA Town Hall
Lakeville Town Hall

Lakeville is governed with the Open Town Meeting form of government, and is led by a town administrator and a board of selectmen. The town has its own police department and a single fire station, located next to the town hall. The "new" library is located behind the old town hall, just across Route 18 from its former location at the junction of Routes 18 and 105. The town of Lakeville also has other services, such as a Council on Aging and a historical commission.

On the state level, Lakeville is represented in the Massachusetts House of Representatives as a part of the Twelfth Bristol District. The town is represented by Senator Michael J. Rodrigues (D-Westport), as a part of the First Bristol and Plymouth District, which also includes Fall River, Freetown, Rochester, Somerset, Swansea and Westport.[14][15]

On the national level, Lakeville is a part of Massachusetts's 4th congressional district, and is currently represented by Joseph P. Kennedy III. The state's senior (Class I) member of the United States Senate, elected in 2012, is Elizabeth Warren. The junior (Class II) senator, elected in 2013, is Ed Markey.

Education

Since 1959, Lakeville has shared its school department with Freetown, creating the Freetown - Lakeville Regional School District. Lakeville operates several schools for its school aged population. Assawompsett Elementary School is operated by the town for grades K-3. The George R. Austin Intermediate School is operated jointly with Freetown for grade 4 and 5. Freetown-Lakeville Middle School is operated jointly with Freetown for grades 6-8, and Apponequet Regional High School is jointly operated with Freetown for grades 9-12. Apponequet's colors are navy, white, and red, their nickname is the "Lakers," and their mascot was a Wampanoag brave, but after a sensitivity issue among one of the faculty at Apponequet, it was changed to an "A". The school, like several others in the region, used to use the spear logo made famous by Florida State University and the Washington Redskins for its athletics marks, but this was deemed to promote violence, so it was replaced with the "A". Their teams compete in the South Coast Conference, and their chief rival is Old Rochester Regional High School in Mattapoisett.

Transportation

Massachusetts Route 140, a four-lane divided highway, passes through the town on its trip between Route 24 in nearby Taunton and Interstate 195 in New Bedford. The town is also crossed by Route 18, Route 79 and Route 105, as well as a short, 0.4-mile (0.64 km) stretch of U.S. Route 44 in the far northern point of town. Route 79's eastern terminus is at its intersection with Route 105 on the town line. Additionally, three exits of Interstate 495 are located just over the town line in Middleborough, granting access to Routes 44, 18 and 105 (from north to south in order).

In addition to its highways, the terminus of the Middleborough-Lakeville Line of the MBTA's commuter rail is along the town's border (the rail itself passes along the town line; the parking lots are entirely within Lakeville). There is also a spur off that line, heading due west to Taunton, which is operated by CSX Transportation. This spur links the two main lines of the railroad in southeastern Massachusetts; the easternmost heads to Cape Cod via the line used by the MBTA, and the westernmost proceeds to split in Taunton, sending two lines towards Fall River and New Bedford, respectively. The New Bedford line also passes through the town on its west side. The town has no air facilities of its own. The nearest private airfield is in Taunton; the nearest regional airport is in New Bedford, and the nearest national and international airport is T. F. Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island.

References

  1. ^ "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Lakeville town, Plymouth County, Massachusetts". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved March 20, 2012.
  2. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Kingston town, Plymouth County, Massachusetts". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved March 20, 2012.
  3. ^ "TOTAL POPULATION (P1), 2010 Census Summary File 1, All County Subdivisions within Massachusetts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 13, 2011.
  4. ^ "Massachusetts by Place and County Subdivision - GCT-T1. Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on November 3, 2011. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  5. ^ "1990 Census of Population, General Population Characteristics: Massachusetts" (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1990. Table 76: General Characteristics of Persons, Households, and Families: 1990. 1990 CP-1-23. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 7, 2013. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  6. ^ "1980 Census of the Population, Number of Inhabitants: Massachusetts" (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1981. Table 4. Populations of County Subdivisions: 1960 to 1980. PC80-1-A23. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  7. ^ "1950 Census of Population" (PDF). 1: Number of Inhabitants. Bureau of the Census. 1952. Section 6, Pages 21-10 and 21-11, Massachusetts Table 6. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1930 to 1950. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  8. ^ "1920 Census of Population" (PDF). Bureau of the Census. Number of Inhabitants, by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions. Pages 21-5 through 21-7. Massachusetts Table 2. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1920, 1910, and 1920. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  9. ^ "1890 Census of the Population" (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. Pages 179 through 182. Massachusetts Table 5. Population of States and Territories by Minor Civil Divisions: 1880 and 1890. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  10. ^ "1870 Census of the Population" (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1872. Pages 217 through 220. Table IX. Population of Minor Civil Divisions, &c. Massachusetts. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  11. ^ "1860 Census" (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1864. Pages 220 through 226. State of Massachusetts Table No. 3. Populations of Cities, Towns, &c. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  12. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  13. ^ a b [1]
  14. ^ Index of Legislative Representation by City and Town, from Mass.gov
  15. ^ Station D-4, SP Middleborough

External links

Acushnet River

The Acushnet River is the largest river, 8.6 miles (13.8 km) long, flowing into Buzzards Bay in southeastern Massachusetts, in the United States. The name "Acushnet" comes from the Wampanoag or Algonquian word, "Cushnea", meaning "as far as the waters", a word that was used by the original owners of the land in describing the extent of the parcel they intended to sell to the English settlers from the nearby Plimouth colony. Quite naturally, the English mistook "Cushnea" for a fixed placename or the name of a specific river.

Anuxanon Island

Anuxanon Island is a small forested crescent-shaped island in the Great Quittacas Pond within the town of Lakeville, Massachusetts, United States. The island is southeast of Cedar Pond and the intersection of Route 105 & Long Point Road.

Apponequet Regional High School

Apponequet Regional High School opened September 21, 1959, and serves secondary academic education students from the towns of Freetown, Assonet, and Lakeville, Massachusetts.

Assawompset Pond

Assawompset Pond is a reservoir/pond within the towns of Lakeville and Middleboro, in southeastern Massachusetts. It shares its waters with Long Pond and is openly connected with Pocksha Pond. These lakes provide a source of drinking water to the city of New Bedford, the largest city in southeastern Massachusetts. At almost four square miles, it is the largest natural lake in Massachusetts.

It is known in Wampanoag as Place of the White Stones and is host for the largest alewife (herring) run in the eastern seaboard. In the early spring the Nemasket River runs black with fish heading for the spawning grounds. The area known as Betty's Neck was one of the summer encampments for Native Americans who would traverse the Taunton River and Nemasket River to enter the pond. The Nemasket, being known as Where the fish are, explains the significance as a food source.

The origins of the King Philip's War started with the discovery of John Sassamon's body and the subsequent trial of his suspected murderers. His body was slipped under the ice on the pond and found the following spring. The outcome of the trial sparked the beginning of hostilities.

The pond was dammed in 1894 at the Nemasket River, which raised the water level about five feet.

Camp Joe Hooker

Camp Joe Hooker was an American Civil War training camp located in Lakeville, Massachusetts.

Cedar Pond (Massachusetts)

Cedar Pond is a small oval-shaped pond in the town of Lakeville, Massachusetts. It is located just off of Somserset Lane from Long Point Road, which is easily accessible from Route 105. The pond is primarily used for irrigating nearby bogs and farmland.

Cedar Swamp River

The Cedar Swamp River is a small river in Lakeville, Massachusetts that flows 4.6 miles (7.4 km) in a northwesterly direction through the western part of the town to where it forms the Assonet River near the Freetown line, just south of the village of Myricks. It is a tributary of the Taunton River.The river is crossed by a railroad line that was originally built as the Taunton and New Bedford Railroad in 1840. It is now operated by CSX.

Freetown

Freetown is the capital and largest city of Sierra Leone. It is a major port city on the Atlantic Ocean and is located in the Western Area of the country. Freetown is Sierra Leone's major urban, economic, financial, cultural, educational and political centre, as it is the seat of the Government of Sierra Leone. The population of Freetown was 1,055,964 at the 2015 census.The city's economy revolves largely around its harbour, which occupies a part of the estuary of the Sierra Leone River in one of the world's largest natural deep water harbours.

The population of Freetown is ethnically, culturally, and religiously diverse. The city is home to a significant population of all of Sierra Leone's ethnic groups, with no single ethnic group forming more than 29% of the city's population. As in virtually all parts of Sierra Leone, the Krio language is Freetown's primary language of communication and is by far the most widely spoken language in the city.

The city of Freetown was founded on March 11, 1792 by Lieutenant John Clarkson and African American ex-slaves and free people called the Nova Scotian Settlers, who were transported to Sierra Leone by the Sierra Leone Company in 1792. The city of Freetown was a haven for free-born and freed African American, Liberated African and Caribbean settlers; and their descendants are known as the Creole people. Freetown is the oldest capital to be founded by African Americans, having been founded thirty years before Monrovia, Liberia and is noted for its unique Creole architecture reflecting American and Caribbean influences.

Freetown is locally governed by the Freetown City Council, headed by a mayor. The mayor and members of the Freetown City Council are directly elected by the residents of Freetown in an election held every four years.

The current mayor of Freetown is Yvonne Aki Sawyerr, who was sworn in on May 11, 2018, after her victory in the 2018 Freetown Mayoral election. The Freetown city council has its own municipal police force.

The city of Freetown is divided into three municipal regions; the East End, Central, and the West End, which in turns are divided into 8 electoral wards: East I, East II, East III, Central I, Central II, West I, West II, and West III. The East End is both the most populous, and the most densely populous of the three regions within Freetown.

Great Quittacas Pond

Great Quittacas Pond is a lake, reservoir, or pond within the towns of Lakeville, Middleboro, and Rochester, in southeastern Massachusetts. It shares its waters with Pocksha Pond and possibly nearby Little Quittacas Pond. These lakes provide a source of drinking water to the city of New Bedford, the largest city in southeastern Massachusetts.

Little Quittacas Pond

Little Quittacas Pond is a lake/reservoir/pond within the towns of Lakeville and Rochester, in southeastern Massachusetts. Little Quittacas is one of the five great ponds of Southeastern Massachusetts that includes Long Pond, Assawompset Pond. Pocksha Pond, Great Quittacas and Little Quittacas Ponds. It is the location of the New Bedford Water Works. These lakes provide a source of drinking water to the city of New Bedford, the largest city in southeastern Massachusetts. Snipatuit Pond is an outlier pond that flows into Buzzards Bay, via the Mattapoisett River and is connected to Great Quittacas through Snipituit Brook. The other great ponds drain into Narragansett Bay through the Taunton River. The five ponds are the largest natural fresh watersheds in Massachusetts.

Long Pond (Lakeville, Massachusetts)

Long Pond is a lake within the towns of Lakeville and Freetown, in southeastern Massachusetts. It shares its waters with Assawompset Pond. These lakes provide a source of drinking water to the city of New Bedford, the largest city in southeastern Massachusetts. Long Pond is roughly one mile wide by four miles long, and contains three islands within its boundaries. In 1894 Assawompset Pond was dammed, increasing the water depth of Long Pond (which is connected by a small river) by about five feet. This created Nelson Island and caused Sunken Island to disappear due to erosion. All that remains of Sunken Island are the rocks in a shallow area just to the northwest of Lewis Island. Lewis Island is the largest of the three remaining islands today, containing sixteen privately owned cottages, while the second largest island, Nelson Island, was purchased in 2005 and now is a year-round private residence. The smallest island, Goat Island, was recently purchased from the Boy Scouts by a private citizen. Along the perimeter of the lake are many homes and private access points to the waterfront. Long Pond is well known for fishing and boating.

At the northeast corner of the lake is a canal that meanders through the Parkhurst development and is navigable by boat. There is a small bridge that allows foot and road traffic onto the artificial island. In the northwest corner of the lake is a river that feeds into Assawompset Pond, which winds through the marshland before passing under Route 18 and connecting with Assawompset. It is locally known as the "Snake River," but is also labeled as the Long Pond River on some maps.

Nemasket River

The Nemasket or Namasket River is a small river in southeastern Massachusetts. It flows north 11.2 miles (18.0 km) from Assawompset Pond in Lakeville and through Middleborough where it empties into the Taunton River.In Wampanoag Nemasket means Place where the fish are, because it is the largest alewife run on the eastern seaboard. The water is clear and there are several good places to put in, such as Old Bridge Street, Wareham Street and Oliver Mills on U.S. Route 44.

The Native American Wampanoag Indians would leave their winter encampments inland and navigate the Taunton River to the Nemasket River in the early spring to take advantage of the alewife run and relocate to their summer encampment on Betty's Neck on Assawompsett Pond. When Oliver Mills built the factory that spanned the river, it created contention with the Wampanoags by forcing them to portage around the facility.

The remnants of Camp Joe Hooker, a training camp for Massachusetts regiments during the American Civil War located on the left side of Staples Shore Road, and the tie-up for the side-paddle wheeler Assawompset can still be seen off the canal that cuts across the right hand side of the marsh between Bridge Street and Vaughn Street. This was a tourist destination (before the dam was erected) for folks that wanted to spend a day on Assawompset Pond.

Norman Orrall

Norman Orrall is a State Representative currently serving in the Massachusetts House of Representatives representing Berkley, East Taunton, Lakeville, and Middleborough as the 12th Bristol District. He has been serving since 2018 and is a member of the Republican Party. Orall serves on the Joint Committee on State Administration and Regulatory Oversight, the House Committee on Bonding, Capital Expenditures and State Assets, the Joint Committee on Environment, Natural Resources and Agriculture, and the Joint Committee on Transportation. He is a 1990 graduate of the University of Massachusetts, and worked as a civil engineer and Lakeville Town Moderator prior to his election in 2018. He and his wife, Keiko, have two children.

North Lakeville, Massachusetts

North Lakeville is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Lakeville in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 2,630 at the 2010 census.

Ocean Spray (cooperative)

Ocean Spray is an American agricultural cooperative of growers of cranberries and grapefruit headquartered in Plymouth County, Massachusetts. It currently has over 700 member growers (in Massachusetts, Wisconsin, New Jersey, Oregon, Washington, Florida, British Columbia and other parts of Canada, as well as Chile). The cooperative employs about 2,000 people, with sales of $1.2 billion in fiscal year 2013 and account for 70% of North American cranberry production. Their products include cranberry sauce, fruit juices, fruit snacks, and dried cranberries.

The cooperative has made a number of innovations, including the first juice blend, the first juice boxes, and sweetened dried cranberries (Craisins). Its cranberry juice won the ChefsBest Award for best taste.

Pocksha Pond

Pocksha Pond is a lake/reservoir/pond within the towns of Lakeville and Middleboro, in southeastern Massachusetts. It shares its waters with Great Quittacas Pond and openly connected with Assawompset Pond. These lakes provides a source of drinking water to the city of New Bedford, the largest city in southeastern Massachusetts.

Historical population
YearPop.±%
18601,160—    
18701,159−0.1%
18801,008−13.0%
1890935−7.2%
1900958+2.5%
19101,141+19.1%
19201,419+24.4%
19301,574+10.9%
19401,780+13.1%
19502,066+16.1%
19603,209+55.3%
19704,376+36.4%
19805,931+35.5%
19907,785+31.3%
20009,821+26.2%
201010,602+8.0%
* = population estimate. Source: United States Census records and Population Estimates Program data.[3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11]
Municipalities and communities of Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States
Cities
Towns
CDPs
Other
villages
Counties
Major cities
Cities and towns
100k-250k
Cities and towns
25k-100k
Cities and towns
10k-25k
Sub-regions

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