Lahaina, Hawaii

Lahaina is the largest census-designated place (CDP) in West Maui, Maui County, Hawaii, United States and includes the Ka'anapali and Kapalua beach resorts. As of the 2010 census, the CDP had a resident population of 11,704.[1] Lahaina encompasses the coast along Hawaii Route 30 from a tunnel at the south end, through Olowalu and to the CDP of Napili-Honokowai to the north. During the tourist season, the population can swell to nearly 40,000 people.

Lahaina's popularity as a tropical getaway has made its real estate some of the most expensive in Hawaii; many luxury homes and condos sell for more than $5 million.[2]

Lahaina, Hawaii
Scenic Lahaina oceanfront
Scenic Lahaina oceanfront
Location in Maui County and the state of Hawaii
Location in Maui County and the state of Hawaii
Lahaina is located in Hawaii
Lahaina
Lahaina
Location in Hawaii
Coordinates: 20°53′10″N 156°40′29″W / 20.88611°N 156.67472°WCoordinates: 20°53′10″N 156°40′29″W / 20.88611°N 156.67472°W
CountryUnited States
StateHawaii
CountyMaui
Area
 • Total9.3 sq mi (24.1 km2)
 • Land7.8 sq mi (20.2 km2)
 • Water1.5 sq mi (3.9 km2)
Elevation
3 ft (1 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total11,704
 • Density1,300/sq mi (490/km2)
Time zoneUTC-10 (Hawaii-Aleutian)
ZIP codes
96761, 96767
Area code(s)808
FIPS code15-42950
GNIS feature ID0361678

History

Lahaina HokojiMission
Hokoji Shingon Mission in downtown Lahaina, a Japanese Buddhist temple

In antiquity Lahaina was the royal capital of Maui Loa, aliʻi nui of the island of Maui, after he ceded the royal seat of Hana to the ruler of Hawaii Island. In Lahaina, the focus of activity is along Front Street, which dates back to the 1820s. It is lined with stores and restaurants and often packed with tourists. The Banyan Court Park features an exceptionally large banyan tree (Ficus benghalensis) planted by William Owen Smith on April 24, 1873, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the arrival of Christian missionaries.[3] It is also the site of the reconstructed ruins of Lahaina Fort, originally built in 1832.[4] It is the largest Banyan Tree in the United States.

Lele was an ancient name of Lahaina. The Hawaiian language name Lā hainā means "cruel sun", describing the sunny dry climate.[5] Lahaina's historic district averages only 13 inches (330 mm) of rain per year, much of which occurs from December to February.

Lahaina, Maui, T.H. - Formerly the Capital - NARA - 296063
Circa 1903 - 1910

In 1795, before unification of the islands, the town was conquered by Kamehameha the Great. Lahaina was the capital of the Kingdom of Hawaii from 1820 to 1845.[6] King Kamehameha III, son of Kamehameha I, preferred the town to bustling Honolulu. He built a palace complex on a 1 acre (0.40 ha) island Mokuʻula surrounded by a pond called Moku Hina, said to be home to Kiwahine, a spiritual protector of Maui and the Pi'ilani royal line, near the center of town.[7] In 1824, at the chiefs' request, Betsey Stockton started the first mission school open to the common people.[8] It was once an important destination for the 19th-century whaling fleet, whose presence at Lahaina frequently led to conflicts with the Christian missionaries living there. On more than one occasion the conflict was so severe that it led to sailor riots and even the shelling of Lahaina by the British whaler John Palmer in 1827. In response, Maui Governor Hoapili built the Old Lahaina Fort in 1831 to protect the town from riotous sailors.[9][10]

Lahaina was the capital of the Kingdom of Hawaii from 1820 to 1845, when the capital was moved back to Honolulu. In the 19th century, Lahaina was the center of the global whaling industry, with many sailing ships anchoring at its waterfront; today pleasure craft make their home there. Lahaina's Front Street has been ranked one of the "Top Ten Greatest Streets" by the American Planning Association.[11]

Geography

Lahaina is located at 20°53′10″N 156°40′29″W / 20.88611°N 156.67472°W (20.886122, -156.674602).[12] According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 9.3 square miles (24.1 km2), of which 7.8 square miles (20.2 km2) is land and 1.5 square miles (3.9 km2), or 16.26%, is water.[13]

Climate

There are many different climates in the different districts of Lahaina. The historic district is the driest and calmest and hosts the small boat harbor. Kaanapali is north of a wind line and has double the annual rainfall and frequent breezes. The Kapalua and Napili areas have almost four times the annual rainfall compared to the historic district of Lahaina.

Maui's west coast includes several different micro climates and wind lines. Lahaina's northern end gets four times as much rainfall as historic Lahaina and is cooler. The Kaanapali area of Lahaina gets twice as much rain as historic Lahaina.

Lahaina has a tropical, semi-arid climate (Köppen BSh) with warm temperatures year-round.

Lahaina panorama
Lahaina panorama
Lahaina waterfront panorama
Lahaina waterfront panorama

Attractions

The southern end of Front Street is home to the largest Banyan Tree in the United States.

Front street is a popular attraction with stores and restaurants, as well as many historical sights such as the Bailey Museum, the Lahaina Courthouse, and the Prison. The many restaurants along Front Street offer a broad variety of food and entertainment, making it the hub of West Maui's night life. A variety of shops and galleries line both sides of the oceanfront Front Street.

The West Maui mountains have beautiful valleys visible from the historic district of Lahaina. The valleys are the backdrop for "the 5 o'clock rainbow" that happens almost every day. In 1831 a fort was built for defense, and the reconstructed remains of its 20-foot (6.1 m) walls and original cannons can still be seen. Also near the small boat harbor are the historic Pioneer Inn and the Baldwin House museum in the historic district of Lahaina.

Hale Paʻi, located at Lahainaluna High School, is the site of Hawaii's first printing press, including Hawaii's first paper currency, printed in 1843.

The Plantation Course at Kapalua hosts the PGA Tour's Sentry Tournament of Champions every January.

Carthaginian II was a museum ship moored in the harbor of this former whaling port-of-call. Built in 1920 and brought to Maui in 1973, it served as a whaling museum until 2005, and after being sunk in 95 feet (29 m) of water about 12-mile (0.80 km) offshore to create an artificial reef, now serves as a diving destination. It replaced an earlier replica of a whaler, Carthaginian, which had been converted to film scenes for the 1966 movie Hawaii.

Halloween is a major celebration in Lahaina and has become a signature event, with crowds averaging between 20-30 thousand people.[15] The evening starts off by closing Front Street to vehicles so the "Keiki Parade" of children in costumes can begin. Eventually, adults in costumes join in, and by dark the street becomes one big party. Some refer to Halloween night in Lahaina as the "Mardi Gras of the Pacific".[16] In 2008 the celebration was curtailed due to the objections of a group of cultural advisers who felt Halloween was an affront to Hawaiian culture. In the following years the event was poorly attended, as the street was not closed and no costume contest took place. In 2011, citing economic concerns, the County permitted the annual signature event to fully resume.[11]

From November to May, whale watching excursions are popular with tourists. The peak season for whale watching in Lahaina is January–March.[17]

Each November, Lahaina hosts the Maui Invitational, one of the top early-season tournaments in college basketball. The event is sponsored by Maui Jim and is held in the Lahaina Civic Center.

The Lahaina Aquatic Center hosts swim meets and water polo.[18]

Lahaina also hosts the finish of the Vic-Maui Yacht Race, which starts in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. This race started in the 1960s and is held every two years.

The historic district has preserved 60 historic sites within a small area and they are managed by the Lahaina Restoration.

Crime rate

The chances of becoming a victim of crime in Lahaina is 1 in 385, compared to a higher rate of 1 in 323 in the State of Hawaii as a whole.[19]

Media References

There have been many movies that were filmed in Lahaina such as Clint Eastwood's Hereafter, in which a monster tsunami ravages Front Street. [20]

Gallery

Banyan-tree-Lahaina-Hawaii

The banyan tree in Courthouse Square is the largest banyan tree in the United States.

BanyanatLāhainā

The banyan tree

Baldwin House

The Baldwin House, a historical landmark built in the 1800s

MauiActivities&Tours

Breaching humpback whale off beach of Lahaina

See also

References

  1. ^ "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Lahaina CDP, Hawaii". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved December 28, 2011.
  2. ^ "Hawaiian Real Estate Trends - A New Way to Look at Hawaii Realty". RealEstate.com. Retrieved 16 January 2013.
  3. ^ John R. K. Clark (2001). Hawai'i place names: shores, beaches, and surf sites. University of Hawaii Press. p. 23. ISBN 978-0-8248-2451-8.
  4. ^ Maui Historical Society. (1971) [1961]. Lahaina Historical Guide. Tokyo: Charles E. Tuttle, Co.
  5. ^ Pukui and Elbert (2004). "lookup of Lā-hainā". on Place Names of Hawai'i. Ulukau, the Hawaiian Electronic Library, University of Hawaii. Archived from the original on 2012-07-17. Retrieved 2009-12-31.
  6. ^ Pukui and Elbert (2004). "lookup of Lahaina". on Place Names of Hawai'i. Ulukau, the Hawaiian Electronic Library, University of Hawaii. Archived from the original on 2012-07-19. Retrieved 2009-12-31.
  7. ^ P.C. Klieger, 1998. The restoration of this site has been delayed. Moku`ula: Maui's Sacred Isle Bishop Museum Press, Honolulu.
  8. ^ Dodd, Carol Santoki (1984). "Betsey Stockton". In Peterson, Barbara Bennett (ed.). Notable Women of Hawaii. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. pp. 358–360. ISBN 978-0-8248-0820-4. OCLC 11030010.
  9. ^ "Lahaina Harbor History". Hawaii Harbors Network. Retrieved May 17, 2017.
  10. ^ Busch, Briton C. (1993). "Whalemen, Missionaries, and the Practice of Christianity in the Nineteenth-Century Pacific" (PDF). The Hawaiian Journal of History. Honolulu: Hawaiian Historical Society. 27: 91–118. hdl:10524/499. OCLC 60626541.
  11. ^ a b "Maui's Front Street Named to Top 10 Great Streets for 2011 - Maui Now". mauinow.com.
  12. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  13. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Lahaina CDP, Hawaii". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved December 28, 2011.
  14. ^ http://www.weather.com/weather/monthly/l/USHI0055:1:US
  15. ^ "In Lahaina, a monumental Maui Halloween" from Island Life October 29, 2004
  16. ^ "Halloween Destinations". Travel Channel.
  17. ^ http://mauiwhalewatching.com
  18. ^ "Lahaina Aquatic Center". mauicounty.gov. Retrieved 2019-04-10.
  19. ^ "Lahaina, 96761 Crime Rates and Crime Statistics - NeighborhoodScout". www.neighborhoodscout.com. Retrieved 2018-11-12.
  20. ^ "Maui in the Movies | Maui Time". mauitime.com. Retrieved 2019-07-08.

External links

2009 Maui Invitational Tournament

The 2009 Maui Invitational Tournament, an annual early-season college basketball tournament held in Lahaina, Hawaii, was held at Lahaina Civic Center. The winning team was Gonzaga.

2010 Maui Invitational Tournament

The 2010 Maui Invitational Tournament, an annual early-season college basketball tournament held in Lahaina, Hawaii, was won by the Connecticut Huskies.

Angus McKelvey

Angus L.K. McKelvey (born in 1968 in Honolulu, Hawaii) is an American politician and a Democratic member of the Hawaii House of Representatives since January 2007 representing District 10.

Cheeseburger in Paradise (restaurant)

Cheeseburger in Paradise was a casual dining restaurant chain in the United States but is now a single restaurant in Secaucus, New Jersey. The first restaurant opened on August 19, 2002, in the Southport area of Indianapolis, Indiana. It is a theme restaurant named for the song "Cheeseburger in Paradise" by American pop music singer Jimmy Buffett. The chain was a partnership of Buffett's company, the Orlando, Florida-based Margaritaville Holdings LLC, and OSI Restaurant Partners, with Buffett licensing the name and Outback Steakhouse operating the franchising of restaurants. It is currently a subsidiary of Luby's.

In September 2009, Cheeseburger in Paradise was sold to Paradise Restaurant Group, LLC. Jimmy Buffett was only a Royalty Partner receiving 2% of profits until selling Paradise Restaurant Group the rights to the song "Cheeseburger in Paradise". In December 2012, Luby's purchased Paradise Restaurant Group for $11 million, thereby acquiring all of the restaurants and ending Jimmy Buffett's association with the chain. At the time of the sale, the company had 23 locations in 14 states.In August 2018, all restaurants except for the Omaha, Nebraska, and Secaucus, New Jersey, locations were closed, including the original restaurant in Indianapolis.The Omaha location closed in early October 2018. The only remaining Cheeseburger in Paradise location left open is in Secaucus.

Hercules Mata'afa

Hercules Mata'afa (born September 18, 1995) is an American football defensive end for the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Washington State University.

Jean Okada

Jean Okada (born June 7, 1974) is a former professional tennis player from the United States.

KPOA

KPOA (93.5 FM) is a radio station broadcasting a Hawaiian Adult Contemporary format. Licensed to Lahaina, Hawaii, United States, the station is owned by Pacific Radio Group, Inc.

Lahaina Civic Center

The Lahaina Civic Center is a sports, convention and entertainment complex located at Ka'a'ahi Street and Honoapi'ilani Highway in Lahaina, Hawaii, on the island of Maui. It is the site of the annual Maui Invitational Basketball Tournament, held every November during Thanksgiving week and hosted by Chaminade University. Other events include the World Youth Basketball Tournament in July, concerts, trade shows, community festivals and fairs.

Lahaina Historic District

Lahaina Historic District is a historic district in Lahaina, Hawaii, on the west side of the island of Maui.

Donn Beach and Pete Wimberly played an important early role in establishing building ordinances to govern restoration and preservation projects in Lahaina. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1962. At that time it was described: Long the residence of Maui kings and chiefs, Lahaina preserves the atmosphere of a mid-19th century Hawaiian seaport, when it was a favorite port of call for American whalers. It was also the center of missionary activities.

Lahaina Roads

Lahaina Roads, also called the Lahaina Roadstead is a channel of the Pacific Ocean in the Hawaiian Islands. The surrounding islands of Maui, and Lānaʻi (and to a lesser extent, Molokaʻi and Kahoʻolawe) make it a sheltered anchorage.

Through the 1940s, Lahaina Roads was an alternative anchorage to Pearl Harbor. While planning for the attack on the U.S. Pacific Fleet, Japanese planners hoped that some significant units would be at anchor there. With Lahaina's deep water, any elements of the Pacific Fleet that were sunk there in all likelihood would never have been recovered.

It is located around the area 20°52′0″N 156°44′0″W, off the coast of the town of Lahaina.

The possibility that elements of the Pacific Fleet would be at Lahaina Anchorage was taken seriously in the plan of the Kido Butai (the Japanese naval strike force) for the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941. Scout planes were dispatched from the fleet, and I class submarines were sent to Lahaina Roads to reconnoiter the anchorage.The name is also used for a vacation condominium complex in Lahaina.

Maria Lanakila Catholic Church

Maria Lanakila Catholic Church is a parish of the Roman Catholic Church of Hawaii in the United States. Located in Lahaina on the island of Maui, the church falls under the jurisdiction of the Diocese of Honolulu and its bishop. The parish has a mission in Kapalua under the title of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary. Maria Lanakila means "Victorious Mary", the Hawaiian language equivalent to the English language epithet "Our Lady of Victory", which refers to the Blessed Virgin Mary.

The first Catholic priests arrived on Maui on April 21, 1846. The pastor was Fr. Aubert of the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary. A temporary church was built on the site, with a new structure dedicated September 8, 1858. In 1927–1928 a concrete church was built on the original foundation. The pastor as of 2009 was Gary P. Colton.

The church is a contributing property of the Lahaina Historic District, designated a National Historic Landmark District on December 29, 1962.

It is located on 712 Waineʻe Street, coordinates 20°52′31″N 156°40′36″W.

The church appeared in the ABC television series Hart to Hart ("Harts and Palms," Season 3, Episode 14).

Maui Invitational Tournament

The Maui Invitational, currently known as the Maui Jim Maui Invitational, is an annual early-season college basketball tournament that takes place Thanksgiving Week in Lahaina, Hawaii, at the Lahaina Civic Center on the island of Maui. It is hosted by Chaminade University of Honolulu, an NCAA Division II school. Seven NCAA Division I men's basketball teams are invited to Maui to complete the field. The Maui Invitational has been played since 1984, is carried by ESPN. Maui Jim became the title sponsor of the tournament in 2015; the previous fourteen tournaments sponsored by EA Sports.

Maui Jim

Maui Jim is a Peoria, Illinois-based manufacturer of sunglasses. The company was founded in Lahaina, Hawaii in 1980.As of 2015, the company was the third largest producer of sunglasses in the world.

Mitchell Loewen

Mitchell Loewen (born February 14, 1993) is an American football defensive end for the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Arkansas.

Mokuʻula

Mokuʻula is a tiny island now buried beneath an abandoned baseball field in Maluʻulu o Lele Park, Lahaina, Hawaiʻi. It was the private residence of King Kamehameha III from 1837 to 1845 and the burial site of several Hawaiian royals. The 1-acre (4,000 m2) island was and continues to be considered sacred to many Hawaiians as a piko, or symbolic center of energy and power. According to Klieger, "the moated palace of Mokuʻula...was a place of the "Sacred Red Mists," an oasis of rest and calm during the raucous, rollicking days of Pacific whaling." When the capital of Hawaiʻi moved from Lahaina to Honolulu, Mokuʻula fell into disrepair. By 1919, the county turned the land into a park. Efforts are currently underway to revive the site.

It was added to the Hawaiʻi State Register of Historic Places on August 29, 1994, and to the National Register of Historic Places on May 9, 1997 as King Kamehameha III's Royal Residential Complex.

Rosalyn Baker

Rosalyn H. Baker (born September 20, 1946 in El Campo, Texas) is an American politician and a Democratic member of the Hawaii Senate since January 16, 2013 representing District 6. Baker served consecutively from 2003 until 2013 in the District 5 seat, and previously served from 1993 until 1999, having served consecutively in the Hawaii State Legislature from 1989 until 1993 in the Hawaii House of Representatives. Baker was appointed to the Senate in 1993 and currently serves as the Senate Chair of Commerce and Consumer Protection.

Tennis Championships of Maui

The Tennis Championships of Maui (formerly known as the Honolulu Challenger, the Maui Challenger and the Royal Lahaina Challenger) is a professional tennis tournament played on outdoor hard courts. It is currently part of the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) Challenger Tour. It is held annually in Lahaina, Maui. It was moved from Honolulu to Maui in 2013, and to the Royal Lahaina in 2014. The tournament was included in the ITF Women's Circuit for one year, in 2016.

Waiola Church

Waiola Church is the site of a historic mission established in 1823 on the island of Maui in Hawaii. Originally called Waineʻe Church until 1953, the cemetery is the final resting place for early members of the royal family of the Kingdom of Hawaii.

Wo Hing Society Hall

The Wo Hing Society Hall is a building located at 858 Front Street in the Lahaina Historic District in Lahaina, Hawaii. Built around 1912, it served the growing Chinese population centered in Lahaina, primarily those working in the sugarcane industry as a social and fraternal hall for the Wo Hing Society. By the 1940s the declining Chinese population in Lahaina slowly made the building redundant and the property was neglected.

In 1983, the Lahaina Restoration Foundation worked with the Wo Hing Society to restore the building to its former appearance. After restoration and construction in 1984, the museum was opened to the public. It currently operates under the name Wo Hing Museum and is one of only two existing Chinese Society Halls on Maui. It was placed on the Hawaii State Register of Historic Places on July 30, 1982, and, as Wo Hing Society Building, was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on November 15, 1982.

Climate data for Lahaina, Maui
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 89
(32)
89
(32)
91
(33)
89
(32)
91
(33)
93
(34)
93
(34)
97
(36)
94
(34)
94
(34)
92
(33)
91
(33)
97
(36)
Average high °F (°C) 82
(28)
82
(28)
83
(28)
84
(29)
84
(29)
86
(30)
87
(31)
88
(31)
88
(31)
87
(31)
85
(29)
83
(28)
85
(29)
Average low °F (°C) 64
(18)
64
(18)
65
(18)
66
(19)
67
(19)
69
(21)
70
(21)
71
(22)
71
(22)
70
(21)
68
(20)
66
(19)
68
(20)
Record low °F (°C) 54
(12)
53
(12)
54
(12)
54
(12)
57
(14)
60
(16)
62
(17)
63
(17)
61
(16)
58
(14)
56
(13)
52
(11)
52
(11)
Average rainfall inches (mm) 3.15
(80)
2.04
(52)
1.83
(46)
0.74
(19)
0.44
(11)
0.08
(2.0)
0.14
(3.6)
0.28
(7.1)
0.31
(7.9)
0.89
(23)
1.83
(46)
2.90
(74)
14.63
(371.6)
Source: The Weather Channel[14]
Islands, municipalities, and communities of Maui County, Hawaii, United States
CDPs
Unincorporated
communities
Footnotes

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.