Ladies' Gaelic football

Ladies' Gaelic football (Irish: Peil Ghaelach na mBan) is a team sport for women, very similar to Gaelic football, and co-ordinated by the Ladies' Gaelic Football Association. The sport originated in Ireland and is most popular there, although it is played in other countries, often by members of the Irish diaspora.

Ladies' Gaelic football
DBGS-Team at the Gealic Euros 2017
Ladies' football game beginning with a "throw-in" by the referee
Highest governing bodyLadies' Gaelic Football Association (LGFA)
NicknamesLadies' Football
Ladies' Gaelic
First played1926
ClubsMore than 1,000
Characteristics
ContactNo
Team members15 on each team
Mixed genderSingle
TypeOutdoor
EquipmentGaelic football
Presence
OlympicNo
ParalympicNo

Play

Scoring in Gaelic games - H shaped posts
Goalposts and scoring system used in ladies' football

There are two teams of 15 players kick or hand-pass a round ball towards goals at either end of a grass pitch. There are two main competitions in this sport; the National League which is staged during the winter-spring months and is used as a warm-up to the All-Ireland Championship which is played during the summer. The All-Ireland Final is played on the last Sunday in September or the first Sunday in October in Croke Park, Dublin, where the winners receive the Brendan Martin Cup. The National League and Championship are organised by the Ladies' Gaelic Football Association.

Differences from men's football

Most of the rules of ladies' Gaelic football are the same as those for men's game. The main differences are -

  • A player may pick the ball up directly from the ground, so long as she is standing
  • Most matches last 60 minutes; in men's senior inter-county football, games last 70 minutes
  • Kickouts may be taken from the hand
  • Changing hands: Throwing the ball from your right hand to left or vice versa.
  • A countdown clock with siren is used if available; in the men's game, the referee decides the end of the game
  • All deliberate bodily contact is forbidden except when "shadowing" an opponent, competing to catch the ball, or blocking the delivery of the ball
  • A smaller size 4 Gaelic ball is used compared to the size 5 ball used in the men's game.

Ladies' Gaelic football outside Ireland

North America

Canada

Eastern Canada Division

Eastern Canada has multiple ladies teams, including the Halifax Gaels, PEI Celts and Quebec Patriotes and the Montreal Shamrocks

Toronto Division
Brampton Roger Casements

The Casements are a young women's team working on the development of the game in the Toronto region

Western Canada Division
Calgary Chieftains

The Chieftainettes have competed in the west and are currently supporting the development of Celtic games.

Vancouver Harps

In 2007 they became the first team other than the Edmonton ladies to win the Championship.

United States

Midwest Division Pittsburgh Banshees [1]

Southwest Division
Austin Celtic Cowboys
Dallas Fionn MacCumhaills
Denver Gaels
Houston Gaels
San Diego Na Fianna
Northwest Division
Seattle Gaels

Winners of the 2007 Junior B North American Gaelic Football Championship

New York
Manhattan Gaels

New York's newest GAA club

Australasia

  • Australia
  • New Zealand

Asia

  • China
  • Hong Kong
  • Japan
  • Thailand
  • South Korea
  • Singapore
  • UAE (Dubai and Abu Dhabi)

Africa

  • South Africa

External links

1974 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship Final

The 1974 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship Final was the first All-Ireland Final and the deciding match of the 1974 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship, an inter-county ladies' Gaelic football tournament for the top teams in Ireland.

Tipperary won the first title by a single point.

1975 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship Final

The 1975 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship Final was the second All-Ireland Final and the deciding match of the 1975 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship, an inter-county ladies' Gaelic football tournament for the top teams in Ireland.

Tipperary retained the title with an easy win.

1980 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship Final

The 1980 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship Final was the seventh All-Ireland Final and the deciding match of the 1980 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship, an inter-county ladies' Gaelic football tournament for the top teams in Ireland.

Cavan dominated the game but couldn't get the needed scores.

1992 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship Final

The 1992 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship Final was the nineteenth All-Ireland Final and the deciding match of the 1992 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship, an inter-county ladies' Gaelic football tournament for the top teams in Ireland.

Laois thought they had not done themselves justice in the 1991 final, but Waterford beat them again.

1994 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship Final

The 1994 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship Final was the 21st All-Ireland Final and the deciding match of the 1994 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship, an inter-county ladies' Gaelic football tournament for the top teams in Ireland.

Waterford defeated Monaghan.

1995 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship Final

The 1995 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship Final was the 22nd All-Ireland Final and the deciding match of the 1995 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship, an inter-county ladies' Gaelic football tournament for the top teams in Ireland.

Waterford defeated Monaghan for the second year in a row.

2012 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship

The 2012 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship is the 39th edition of the Ladies' Gaelic Football Association's premier inter-county Ladies' Gaelic football tournament. It is known for sponsorship reasons as the TG4 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship.

2013 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship

The 2013 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship was the 40th edition of the Ladies' Gaelic Football Association's premier inter-county Ladies' Gaelic football tournament. It was known for sponsorship reasons as the TG4 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship. It was won by Cork, who defeated Monaghan in the final.

2014 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship

The 2014 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship is the 41st edition of the Ladies' Gaelic Football Association's premier inter-county Ladies' Gaelic football tournament. It is known for sponsorship reasons as the TG4 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship. It will commence on 26 July 2014.

2019 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship

The 2019 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship is the 46th edition of the Ladies' Gaelic Football Association's premier inter-county Ladies' Gaelic Football tournament. It is known for sponsorship reasons as the TG4 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship.

2019 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship Final

The 2019 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship Final is the 46th All-Ireland Final and the deciding match of the 2019 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship, an inter-county ladies' Gaelic football tournament for the county teams of Ireland.

If it is a draw, the game will be replayed on 28 or 29 September.

All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship

The All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship is the premier inter-county competition in the game of ladies' Gaelic football in Ireland. The series of games are organised by the Ladies' Gaelic Football Association (Irish: Cumann Peil Gael na mBan) and are played during the summer months, with the All-Ireland Final being played at Croke Park in Dublin on the last Sunday in September or the first Sunday in October. The qualifiers were introduced in 2008.The winning team is presented with the Brendan Martin Cup. The cup is named after Brendan Martin, a native of Tullamore, County Offaly, who organised Ladies' Gaelic football games in the early 1970s and became one of the first treasurers of the newly founded Ladies' Gaelic Football Association.

Cork senior ladies' football team

The Cork senior ladies' football team represents Cork GAA in senior Ladies' Gaelic football competitions such as the All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship, the Munster Senior Ladies' Football Championship and the Ladies' National Football League. After winning their first All-Ireland and League titles in 2005, Cork went onto dominate both competitions during the late 2000s and the 2010s. Between 2005 and 2009 Cork were All-Ireland champions five times in a row. They then achieved an All-Ireland six in a row between 2011 and 2016. During this era they also won eleven consecutive League titles. In 2014 the Cork senior ladies' football team also won the RTÉ Sports Team of the Year Award.

Dublin Ladies' Senior Football Championship

The Dublin Ladies' Senior Football Championship is the premier Gaelic football championship in Dublin. The 2018 Dublin champions were Foxrock Cabinteely who won their fourth title in a row. Ballyboden St. Enda's are the most successful side in Dublin, having won the title on 10 occasions, Leinster on six occasions and the All Ireland twice. Na Fianna, Portobello & Foxrock-Cabinteeley are the other Dublin clubs to have won provincial honours.

Dublin senior ladies' football team

The Dublin senior ladies' football team represents Dublin GAA in senior Ladies' Gaelic football competitions such as the All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship, the Leinster Senior Ladies' Football Championship and the Ladies' National Football League. Dublin played in their first All-Ireland final in

2003 and won their first All-Ireland title in 2010. Between

2014 and 2018 they played in five successive All-Ireland finals, finishing as winners in 2017 and 2018. In 2018 Dublin also won their first League title.

Gaelic games

Gaelic games are sports played in Ireland under the auspices of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). Gaelic football and hurling are the two main games. Other games organised by the GAA include Gaelic handball (also referred to as GAA Handball or Wallball) and rounders.

Women's versions of hurling and football are also played: camogie, organised by the Camogie Association of Ireland, and ladies' Gaelic football, organised by the Ladies' Gaelic Football Association. While women's versions are not organised by the GAA, they are closely associated with it.Almost a million people (977,723) attended 45 GAA senior championships games in 2017 (up 29% in hurling and 22% in football on 2016 figures) combined with attendances at other championship and league games generating Gate receipts of €34,391,635.

Higher Education GAA

Higher Education GAA is the governing body overseeing the Gaelic games of hurling, camogie and Gaelic football at third level institutions. The body coordinates competitions in both Ireland and Britain, and is a part of the parent organisation, the Gaelic Athletic Association. The main competitions are the Fitzgibbon Cup for hurling and Sigerson Cup for football.

Ireland women's international rules football team

The Ireland women's international rules football team is the Ireland women's representative team in international rules football.

The team was launched in 2006 by the Ladies' Gaelic Football Association, for the purpose of competing against the Australia women's international rules football team, organised by Women's Football Australia, on an annual basis. However the 2006 series was the only series to be played between the two nations.

Ladies' Gaelic Football Association

The Ladies' Gaelic Football Association (Irish: Cumann Peil Gael na mBan) is the organisation which promotes and regulates ladies' Gaelic football in Ireland.

The association has also selected the Ireland women's international rules football team, which will play the Australia women's international rules football team in international rules football for the first time in 2006.

Men's
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Ladies' Gaelic football
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Awards
See also
Overview
Founder members
Presidents
County games
Provincial councils
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