La Stampa

La Stampa (meaning The Press in English) is an Italian daily newspaper published in Turin, Italy. It is distributed in Italy and other European nations. It is one of the oldest newspapers in Italy.[1]

La Stampa
La Stampa front page 2006-12-10
Front page, 10 December 2006
TypeDaily newspaper
FormatBerliner
Owner(s)GEDI Gruppo Editoriale
PublisherEditrice La Stampa
EditorMaurizio Molinari
Founded1 February 1867
Political alignmentLiberalism
Centrism
LanguageItalian
HeadquartersVia Marenco 32, Turin, Italy
Circulation256,203 (2012)
ISSN1122-1763
WebsiteLa Stampa

History and profile

The paper was founded by Vittorio Bersezio, a journalist and novelist, in February 1867[1][2] with the name Gazzetta Piemontese.[3] In 1895, the newspaper was bought (and by then edited) by Alfredo Frassati (father of Pier Giorgio Frassati), who gave it its current name and a national perspective.[3] For criticising the 1924 murder of the socialist Giacomo Matteotti, he was forced to resign and sell the newspaper to Giovanni Agnelli.[3] The financier Riccardo Gualino also took a share.[4] The paper is now owned by GEDI Gruppo Editoriale[5] It has a centrist stance.[6] The former contributors of La Stampa include Italian novelist Alberto Moravia.[7]

La Stampa, based in Turin,[8] was published in broadsheet format[9] until November 2006 when the paper began to be published in the berliner format.[10][11][12] It launched a website in 1999.[2] La Stampa also launched a project, called Vatican Insider, run by the daily newspaper and has among its staff several Vatican affairs analysts.[13]

Since 26 May 2006 it has published a monthly magazine: Specchio+. From 26 January 1996 to 7 April 2006, it was called Specchio, which was published as a weekly supplement, a general interest magazine.[14]

In September 2012 La Stampa moved to its new headquarters in Turin, leaving its historical editorial building.[2] Mario Calabresi is the editor-in-chief of the daily.[15][16][17]

On 9 April 2013 an explosive device was sent by an anarchist group, the Federazione Anarchica Informale/Fronte Rivoluzionario, to the offices of La Stampa.[18] It did not detonate.[18]

In June 2017, during the celebration for its 150 years of activity, LaStampa hosted the international conference “The Future of Newspaper”, where many great actors of the news industry discussed about the future prospects for the news agencies. Among them John Elkann, editor of LaStampa, Jeff Bezos from the Washington Post, Louis Dreyfus CEO of LeMonde and Mark Thompson CEO of The New York Times.[19]

Circulation

The 1988 circulation of La Stampa was 560,000 copies.[5] In 1997 the paper had a circulation of 376,493 copies.[8]

Its circulation was 399,000 copies in 2000[20] and 409,000 copies in 2001.[9] The circulation of the paper was 330,000 copies in 2003[6] and 345,060 copies in 2004.[21] Its 2007 circulation was 314,000 copies.[22] It was 256,203 copies in 2012.[23]

Contributors

Editors

Columnists and journalists

Former journalists

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Lapo Filistrucchi (February 2006). "The Impact of Internet on the Market for Daily Newspapers in Italy" (PDF). EUI Working Paper. Retrieved 9 December 2013.
  2. ^ a b c "Sabiana inside the La Stampa newsroom in Turin". Sabiana. Archived from the original on 5 February 2015. Retrieved 5 February 2015.
  3. ^ a b c "Communicating Europe: Italy Manual" (PDF). European Stability Initiative. 19 May 2008. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  4. ^ "Riccardo Gualino". Storia e Cultura dell'Industria. Retrieved 24 July 2015.
  5. ^ a b Peter Humphreys (1996). Mass Media and Media Policy in Western Europe. Manchester University Press. p. 90. Retrieved 29 October 2014.
  6. ^ a b "The press in Italy". BBC. 31 October 2006. Retrieved 30 November 2014.
  7. ^ Ruth Ben-Ghiat (2001). Fascist Modernities: Italy, 1922-1945 (PDF). Berkeley: University of California Press. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 December 2014. Retrieved 29 December 2014.
  8. ^ a b Jose L. Alvarez; Carmelo Mazza; Jordi Mur (October 1999). "The management publishing industry in Europe" (PDF). University of Navarra. Archived from the original (Occasional Paper No:99/4) on 30 June 2010. Retrieved 27 April 2015.
  9. ^ a b Adam Smith (15 November 2002). "Europe's Top Papers". campaign. Retrieved 5 February 2015.
  10. ^ Roy Greenslade (20 November 2006). "Italy's La Stampa adopts Berliner format". The Guardian. Retrieved 5 February 2015.
  11. ^ "The Berliner format". The Guardian. Retrieved 24 November 2014.
  12. ^ Tony Harcup (May 2014). A Dictionary of Journalism. Oxford University Press. p. 35. ISBN 978-0-19-964624-1. Retrieved 24 November 2014.
  13. ^ About Us La Stampa.
  14. ^ Elena Argentesi (February 2004). "Demand Estimation for Italian Newspapers: the Impact of Weekly Supplements" (PDF). Workshop on Media Economics. Bergen. Retrieved 18 April 2015.
  15. ^ Alastair Reid (12 August 2014). "Inside digital innovation at La Stampa". Journalism. Retrieved 30 November 2014.
  16. ^ Anne Penketh; Philip Oltermann; Stephen Burgen (12 June 2014). "European newspapers search for ways to survive digital revolution". The Guardian. Paris, Berlin, Barcelona. Retrieved 7 January 2015.
  17. ^ Elisabetta Povoledo (29 September 2013). "New Turmoil for Italy Amid Resignation of 5 in Berlusconi's Party". The New York Times. Rome. Retrieved 29 September 2013.
  18. ^ a b Nataliya Rovenskaya (April 2013). "Anarchists and suspected mafia target Italian media". Committee to Protect Journalists. Retrieved 2 December 2014.
  19. ^ "LaStampa - The Future of Newspapers".
  20. ^ "Top 100 dailies 2000". campaign. 16 November 2001. Retrieved 2 March 2015.
  21. ^ "European Publishing Monitor. Italy" (PDF). Turku School of Economics and KEA. Retrieved 5 April 2015.
  22. ^ Anne Austin; et al. (2008). "Western Europe Market and Media Fact" (PDF). Zenith Optimedia. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 February 2015. Retrieved 10 April 2015. Explicit use of et al. in: |author= (help)
  23. ^ Dati Ads - media mobile luglio 2012. Prima Online. 7 September 2012.

Further reading

  • Merrill, John C. and Harold A. Fisher. The world's great dailies: profiles of fifty newspapers (1980) pp 280-85

External links

1867 Italian general election

Bettino Ricasoli resigned as Prime Minister of Italy on 10 April 1867, due to a recalcitrant Italian Chamber. The chamber disapproved of his agreements with the Vatican regarding the repatriation of certain religious properties. Subsequent to his resignation, general elections were held in Italy on 10 March 1867; with the second round of voting on 17 March 1867. These snap elections resulted in Urbano Rattazzi being elected once again to office.Due to the restrictive Italian electoral laws of the time, only 504,265 Italian men, out of a total population of around 26 million, were entitled to vote. The voters were largely aristocrats, rentiers, and capitalists, who tended to hold moderate political views, including loyalty to the crown and low government spending.

1909 Italian Football Championship

The 1909 Italian Football Championship season was won by Pro Vercelli.

In this season, as in the previous one, two championships of Prima Categoria were played:

Italian Championship, the main tournament where only Italian players were allowed to play; the winners would be proclaimed Campioni d'Italia (Italian Champions)

Federal Championship, a secondary tournament where foreign players (if they lived in Italy) were also allowed to play; the winners would be proclaimed Campioni Federali (Federal Champions)The winner of Italian Championship was Juventus. They won as prize Coppa Buni.

The winner of Federal Championship was Pro Vercelli. They won as prize Coppa Oberti.

However, the "spurious international teams" (the clubs composed mostly of foreign players), adversing the autarchical policy of the FIF, decide to withdraw from Italian Championship in order to make the Federal competition the most relevant tournament, and to diminish the Italian one. The dissenters' strategy worked out: the failure of the Italian Championship won by Juventus forced the Federation to later recognized the Federal Champions of Pro Vercelli as "Campioni d'Italia 1909", disavowing the other tournament.

1912 Giro d'Italia

The 1912 Giro d'Italia was the 4th edition of the Giro d'Italia, a cycling race set up and sponsored by the newspaper La Gazzetta dello Sport. The race began on 19 May in Milan with a stage that stretched 398.8 km (248 mi) to Padua. The race was composed of nine stages that covered a total distance of 2,733.6 km (1,699 mi). The race came to a close in Bergamo on 4 June after a 235 km (146 mi) stage. The race was won by the Atala-Dunlop team that finished with Carlo Galetti, Eberardo Pavesi, and Giovanni Micheletto. Second and third respectively were Peugeot and Gerbi.

The calculation of the general classification changed from the previous editions of the race, shifting to a team-based event, with each team only allowed four riders. Points were awarded to teams based upon winning the stage, having multiple riders in the top four places in each stage, and finishing the stage with a minimum of three riders. A total of fourteen teams participated, with 56 riders registering and 54 officially starting the race.

Micheletto won the opening stage of the race to give Atala-Dunlop the first lead in the race. Despite two consecutive stage wins by Legnano riders, Atala-Dunlop still retained the lead going into the fourth stage. The fourth leg was held in rainy conditions that caused some rivers to overflow on the course and riders to take the wrong roads for extensive distances; this led to the cancellation of the stage and addition of a ninth leg that drew some of its route from the Giro di Lombardia. An Atala-Dunlop rider won the fifth stage, but the team lost the lead to Peugeot for one stage. Following the stage, Atala-Dunlop regained the lead and held that to the race's finish in Bergamo.

1948 Giro d'Italia

The 1948 Giro d'Italia was the 31st edition of the Giro d'Italia, a cycling race organized and sponsored by the newspaper La Gazzetta dello Sport. The race began on 15 May in Milan with a stage that stretched 190 km (118 mi) to Turin, finishing back in Milan on 6 June after a 231 km (144 mi) stage and a total distance covered of 4,164 km (2,587 mi). The race was won by the Italian rider Fiorenzo Magni of the Wilier Triestina team, with fellow Italians Ezio Cecchi and Giordano Cottur coming in second and third respectively.

1953 Giro d'Italia

The 1953 Giro d'Italia was the 36th edition of the Giro d'Italia, one of cycling's Grand Tours. The Giro started off in Milan on 12 May with a 263 km (163.4 mi) flat stage and concluded back in Milan with a 220 km (136.7 mi) relatively flat mass-start stage on 2 June. Sixteen teams entered the race, which was won by Italian Fausto Coppi of the Bianchi team. Second and third respectively were Swiss rider Hugo Koblet and Italian Pasquale Fornara.Hugo Koblet held the pink jersey up until the penultimate stage, when Coppi attacked and caught him on the climb up the Stelvio Pass, taking the lead and securing the final victory.

1968 Giro d'Italia

The 1968 Giro d'Italia was the 51st running of the Giro d'Italia, one of cycling's Grand Tour races. The Giro started in Campione d'Italia, on 20 May, with a 5.7 km (3.5 mi) stage and concluded in Naples, on 11 June, with a 235 km (146.0 mi) mass-start stage. A total of 130 riders from 13 teams entered the 22-stage race, which was won by Belgian Eddy Merckx of the Faema team. The second and third places were taken by Italians Vittorio Adorni and Felice Gimondi, respectively.

1974 Giro d'Italia

The 1974 Giro d'Italia was the 57th running of the Giro d'Italia, one of cycling's Grand Tours races. The Giro started in Vatican City, on 16 May, with a 164 km (102 mi) stage and concluded in Milan, on 8 June, with 257 km (160 mi) leg. A total of 140 riders from fourteen teams entered the 22-stage race, that was won by Belgian Eddy Merckx of the Molteni team. The second and third places were taken by Italians Gianbattista Baronchelli and Felice Gimondi, respectively. Merckx's victory in the 1974 Giro was his first step in completing the Triple Crown of Cycling – winning the Giro d'Italia, the Tour de France, and the World Championship road race in one calendar year – becoming the first rider ever to do so.

Amongst the other classifications that the race awarded, Brooklyn's Roger De Vlaeminck won the points classification and José Manuel Fuente of KAS won the mountains classification. KAS finished as the winners of the team points classification.

1981 Giro d'Italia

The 1981 Giro d'Italia was the 64th running of the Giro d'Italia, one of cycling's Grand Tours races. The Giro started in Brescia, on 13 May, with a 6.6 km (4.1 mi) prologue and concluded in Verona, on 7 June, with a 42 km (26.1 mi) individual time trial. A total of 130 riders from thirteen teams entered the 22-stage race, that was won by Italian Giovanni Battaglin of the Inoxpran team. The second and third places were taken by Swede Tommy Prim and Italian Giuseppe Saronni, respectively.Amongst the other classifications that the race awarded, Gis Gelati-Campagnolo's Saronni won the points classification, Claudio Bortolotto of Santini-Selle Italia won the mountains classification, and Hoonved-Bottecchia's Giuseppe Faraca completed the Giro as the best neo-professional in the general classification, finishing eleventh overall. Bianchi-Piaggio finishing as the winners of the team classification, ranking each of the twenty teams contesting the race by lowest cumulative time. In addition, Bianchi-Piaggio won the team points classification.

1982 Giro d'Italia

The 1982 Giro d'Italia was the 65th running of the Giro d'Italia, one of cycling's Grand Tours races. The Giro started in Brescia, on 13 May, with a 16 km (9.9 mi) team time trial and concluded in Turin, on 6 June, with a 42.5 km (26.4 mi) individual time trial. A total of 162 riders from eighteen teams entered the 22-stage race, that was won by Frenchman Bernard Hinault of the Renault-Elf team. The second and third places were taken by Swede Tommy Prim and Italian Silvano Contini, respectively.Amongst the other classifications that the race awarded, Famcucine's Francesco Moser won the points classification, Lucien Van Impe of Metauro Mobili won the mountains classification, and Metauro Mobili's Marco Groppo completed the Giro as the best neo-professional in the general classification, finishing ninth overall. Bianchi finishing as the winners of the team classification, ranking each of the twenty teams contesting the race by lowest cumulative time. In addition, Bianchi won the team points classification.

1984 Giro d'Italia

The 1984 Giro d'Italia was the 67th running of the Giro d'Italia, one of cycling's Grand Tours races. The Giro started in Lucca, on 17 May, with a 5 km (3.1 mi) prologue and concluded in Verona, on 10 June, with a 42 km (26.1 mi) individual time trial. A total of 171 riders from nineteen teams entered the 22-stage race, that was won by Italian Francesco Moser of the Gis Gelati-Tuc Lu team. The second and third places were taken by Frenchman Laurent Fignon and Italian Moreno Argentin, respectively.Amongst the other classifications that the race awarded, Urs Freuler of Atala-Campagnolo won the points classification, Fignon of Renault-Elf won the mountains classification, and Renault-Elf's Charly Mottet completed the Giro as the best neo-professional in the general classification, finishing twenty-first overall. Renault-Elf finishing as the winners of the team classification, ranking each of the twenty teams contesting the race by lowest cumulative time. The team points classification was won by Metauro Mobili-Pinarello.

1987 UCI Road World Championships – Men's road race

The Men's Individual Road Race of the 1987 UCI Road World Championships cycling event took place on September 6 in Villach, Austria. The route consisted of twenty-three laps totaling to a length of 276 km (171 mi). Irishman Stephen Roche won the race, while Italian Moreno Argentin and Spaniard Juan Fernández finished second and third, respectively. By winning the race, Roche also completed the Triple Crown of Cycling, which consists of winning two Grand Tour races and the men's road race at the UCI Road World Championships in a calendar year.

Football in Italy

Football (calcio in Italian) is the most popular sport in Italy. The Italian national football team is considered to be one of the best national teams in the world. They have won the FIFA World Cup four times (1934, 1938, 1982, 2006), trailing only Brazil (with 5), runners-up in two finals (1970, 1994) and reaching a third place (1990) and a fourth place (1978). They have also won one European Championship (1968), also appearing in two finals (2000, 2012), finished third at the Confederations Cup (2013), won one Olympic football tournament (1936) and two Central European International Cups (1927–30 and 1933–35).

Italy's top domestic league, the Serie A, is one of the most popular professional sports leagues in the world and it is often depicted as the most tactical national football league. Italy's club sides have won 48 major European trophies, making them the second most successful nation in European football. Serie A hosts three of the world's most famous clubs as Juventus, Milan and Inter, all founding members of the G-14, a group which represented the largest and most prestigious European football clubs; Serie A was the only league to produce three founding members. Juventus, Milan and Inter, along with Roma, Fiorentina, Lazio and, historically, Parma but now Napoli are known as the Seven Sisters of Italian football. Italian managers are the most successful in European Football, especially in competitions such as the Champions League. More players have won the coveted Ballon d'Or award while playing at a Serie A club than any other league in the world.

Lancia Delta

The Lancia Delta is a small family car produced by Italian automobile manufacturer Lancia in three generations. The first generation produced between 1979 and 1994, the second generation from 1993 to 1999, and the third generation from 2008 to 2014.

The Delta was first shown at the Frankfurt Motor Show in 1979. The Delta dominated the World Rally Championship during the late 1980s and early 1990s. The homologation requirements of Group A regulations meant marketing road-going versions of these competition cars — the Lancia Delta HF 4WD and HF Integrale. A total of 44,296 Integrales were produced.

List of newspapers in Italy

The number of national daily newspapers in Italy was 107 in 1950, whereas it was 78 in 1965. There are also regional newspapers in the country some of which circulation is larger than that of national papers.

List of teams and cyclists in the 1912 Giro d'Italia

The 1912 Giro d'Italia was the 4th edition of Giro d'Italia, one of cycling's Grand Tours, and marked four years since the first race in 1909. The Giro featured 56 riders — all of Italian descent — on 14 cycling teams, starting in Milan on 19 May and finishing in Bergamo on 4 June.The 1912 edition of the Giro d'Italia was unique in that the general classification was a point system that was based on teams rather than individuals as in years past. The organizers limited the entrance of the race to teams of four, which meant there were no independent riders like in previous editions. According to a La Stampa article, there were six professional teams, six incorraggiamento teams, and one military team. The professional teams were Bianchi, Peugeot, Senior, Gerbi, Atala, and Legnano. The incorraggiamento teams were Goerike, Soriani, Soc. Ramella, Favero, Bolgona, and Bergami, while the military team was Stucchi. Each team wore specific, unique colored jersey while racing each day.

Maserati

Maserati (Italian: [mazeˈraːti]) is an Italian luxury vehicle manufacturer established on 1 December 1914, in Bologna. The Maserati tagline is "Luxury, sports and style cast in exclusive cars", and the brand's mission statement is to "Build ultra-luxury performance automobiles with timeless Italian style, accommodating bespoke interiors, and effortless, signature sounding power".The company's headquarters are now in Modena, and its emblem is a trident. It has been owned by the Italian-American car giant Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) and FCA's Italian predecessor Fiat S.p.A. since 1993. Maserati was initially associated with Ferrari S.p.A., which was also owned by FCA until being spun off in 2015, but more recently it has become part of the sports car group including Alfa Romeo and Abarth (see section below). In May 2014, due to ambitious plans and product launches, Maserati sold a record of over 3,000 cars in one month. This caused them to increase production of the Quattroporte and Ghibli models. In addition to the Ghibli and Quattroporte, Maserati offers the Maserati GranTurismo, the GranTurismo Convertible, the Maserati Levante (the first ever Maserati SUV), and the Maserati Alfieri, a new 2+2. Maserati has placed a production output cap at 75,000 vehicles globally.

Maserati 3200 GT

The Maserati 3200 GT (Tipo 338) is a four-seater grand tourer produced by Italian automobile manufacturer Maserati from 1998 to 2002, replacing the Shamal as the flagship grand tourer of the marque. The luxury coupé was designed by Italdesign, whose founder and head Giorgetto Giugiaro previously designed, among others, the Ghibli, Bora and Merak. Interior design was commissioned to Enrico Fumia and completed by 1995. 4,795 cars were produced before it was replaced by the Maserati Coupé.

Turin Auto Show

The Turin Motor Show (Italian: Salone dell'Automobile di Torino) was an auto show held annually in Turin, Italy. The first official show took place between 21 and 24 April 1900, at the Castle of Valentino, becoming a permanent fixture in Turin from 1938 having shared it with Milan and Rome until that time. From 1972, the show was held biannually and in 1984, it moved into Fiat's shuttered Lingotto factory.The event was last held in Turin in June 2000, and cancelled from 2002, resulting in the Bologna Motor Show taking over the role of Italy's International Motor Show. Since 2015, Turin again now holds a Motor Show, albeit as an open air festival to keep exhibitors' costs down and provide free access to the public. It is held in the precinct of the Parco del Valentino.

Turin Marathon

The Turin Marathon (Italian: Maratona di Torino Gran Premio La Stampa) is an annual marathon race which takes place in Turin, Italy in November.

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