LaMarr Hoyt

Dewey LaMarr Hoyt, Jr. (born January 1, 1955, in Columbia, South Carolina) is a former Major League Baseball right-handed pitcher who won the 1983 American League Cy Young Award.

LaMarr Hoyt
Pitcher
Born: January 1, 1955 (age 64)
Columbia, South Carolina
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 14, 1979, for the Chicago White Sox
Last MLB appearance
October 3, 1986, for the San Diego Padres
MLB statistics
Win–loss record98–68
Earned run average3.99
Strikeouts681
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Chicago White Sox

Originally signed by the New York Yankees in the fifth round of the 1973 Major League Baseball draft, Hoyt was traded with fellow pitching prospect Bob Polinsky, outfielder Oscar Gamble and $200,000 to the Chicago White Sox in a 1977 season-opening deal that sent the Yankees shortstop Bucky Dent.[1] A relief pitcher when he made the White Sox to stay in 1980, Hoyt was switched to the starting rotation in 1982 and tied a club record by winning his first nine decisions. The record was first set by Lefty Williams in 1917 and equaled by Orval Grove in 1943. Hoyt ended up leading the American League with nineteen wins and showed devastating control on the mound; he walked a mere 48 batters in 239.2 innings.

Hoyt was even better in 1983, winning the American League Cy Young Award.[2] His 24-10 won-lost record, 3.66 earned run average and even better control than the previous season, (walking 31 batters in 260.2 innings, and leading the league in fewest walks per nine innings for the first of three straight seasons), helped the White Sox capture the American League West title.

He pitched a complete game victory over the Baltimore Orioles in the first game of the 1983 American League Championship Series, giving up only one run on five hits with no walks.[3] This was the only game the ChiSox won in the series.

The White Sox faltered in 1984, as Hoyt's record fell to 13-18 with a 4.47 ERA. He went from winning the most games in the American League in 1983 to losing the most games the following year. Hoping for a rebound from the former Cy Young Award winner, the San Diego Padres traded Ozzie Guillén, Tim Lollar, Bill Long and Luis Salazar to the White Sox for Hoyt, Kevin Kristan and Todd Simmons during the 1984-1985 off-season. Guillen would win the American League Rookie of the Year award in 1985.

San Diego Padres

Hoyt began his National League career promisingly enough, making the NL's All-Star team his first season in the league (though named by his own manager Dick Williams over fellow Padre Andy Hawkins who started the year 11-0) and winning the game's Most Valuable Player award, giving up one run in three innings of work to earn the win. For the season he went 16-8 with a 3.47 ERA. Baseball writer Bill James said Hoyt had the best control of any National League pitcher at this time.[4]

Following the 1985 season, he was arrested twice within a month (between January and February 1986) on drug-possession charges, checking into a rehabilitation program nine days after the second arrest.[5] This prevented him from playing most of Spring training, and he logged an 8-11 won-loss record with a 5.15 ERA.

More off the field problems

Barely a month after the season ended Hoyt was arrested again for drug possession, this time on the U.S.-Mexico border.[6] He was sentenced to 45 days in jail on December 16, 1986, and suspended by then-Commissioner Peter Ueberroth on February 25, 1987. An arbitrator reduced his suspension to sixty days in mid-June and ordered the Padres to reinstate him, but the team gave him his unconditional release the following day.

The White Sox gave him a second chance, signing him after his San Diego release and giving him time to get back into shape, but a fourth arrest on drug charges in December 1987 ended that.[7]

Career stats

W L Pct. ERA G GS CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB K WP HBP BAA Fld% Avg.
98 68 .590 3.99 244 172 48 8 10 1311.1 1313 637 582 140 279 681 13 18 .260 .968 .091

A poor hitter, even by pitchers' standards, Hoyt had just ten hits in 110 career at-bats. The only extra base hit of his career was an RBI double on July 13, 1986 against Tim Conroy of the St. Louis Cardinals.[8]

References

  1. ^ "Yankees Finally Land Bucky Dent". Wilmington Morning Star. April 6, 1977.
  2. ^ "Undoubtedly, Hoyt is Best". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. October 26, 1983.
  3. ^ "1983 American League Championship Series, Game One". Baseball-Reference.com. October 5, 1983.
  4. ^ James, Bill (1986). The Bill James Baseball Abstract 1986. Ballantine Books. p. 296.
  5. ^ "Sports People; Disclosure on Hoyt". The New York Times. March 1, 1986.
  6. ^ "Padres' Hoyt Arrested by U.S. Customs". St. Petersburg Evening Independent. October 29, 1986.
  7. ^ "Hoyt Arrested On Drug Charges". The New York Times. December 7, 1987.
  8. ^ "San Diego Padres 13, St. Louis Cardinals 6". Baseball-Reference.com. July 13, 1986.

External links

1979 Chicago White Sox season

The 1979 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 80th season overall, and their 79th in Major League Baseball. They finished with a record 73-87, good enough for fifth place in the American League West, 15 games behind the first-place California Angels.

1980 Chicago White Sox season

The 1980 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 80th season in Major League Baseball, and its 81st season overall. They finished with a record of 70-90, good enough for 5th place in the American League West, 26 games behind the first-place Kansas City Royals.

In 1979 and 1980, Bill Veeck made overtures to Denver interests. An agreement was reached to sell to Edward J. DeBartolo, Sr., who pledged to keep the club in Chicago. His offer was turned down by the owners. Veeck was forced to sell to a different investment group.

1981 Chicago White Sox season

The 1981 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 81st season in the major leagues, and their 82nd season overall. They finished with a record 54-52, good enough for 3rd place in the American League West, 8.5 games behind the 1st place Oakland Athletics. However, due to a player's strike, the Athletics would play the 50-53 Kansas City Royals, who had finished behind the White Sox.

Owner Bill Veeck attempted to sell the club to Ed DeBartolo, but the offer was turned down by the other owners. Veeck was then forced to sell to a different investment group headed by Jerry Reinsdorf and Eddie Einhorn.

1982 Chicago White Sox season

The 1982 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 82nd season in the major leagues, and their 83rd season overall. They finished with a record 87-75, good enough for 3rd place in the American League West, 6 games behind the 1st place California Angels.

1982 Major League Baseball season

The 1982 Major League Baseball season. Making up for their playoff miss of the year before, the St. Louis Cardinals won their ninth World Series championship, defeating the Milwaukee Brewers, four games to three.

1983 American League Championship Series

The 1983 American League Championship Series was played between the Chicago White Sox and the Baltimore Orioles from October 5 to 8.

The Orioles won the series three games to one. Although the White Sox took Game 1 won by a score of 2–1, the Orioles came back to win the last three games of the series. The Orioles went on to defeat the Philadelphia Phillies in five games in the 1983 World Series. In the regular season the White Sox won the West Division by twenty games with a 99–63 record. The Orioles won the East Division by six games with a 98–64 record.

1983 Chicago White Sox season

The 1983 Chicago White Sox season was a season in American baseball. It involved the White Sox winning the American League West championship on September 17. It marked their first postseason appearance since the 1959 World Series. It was the city of Chicago's first baseball championship of any kind (division, league, or world), since the White Sox themselves reached the World Series twenty-four years earlier.

After the White Sox went through a winning streak around the All-Star break, Texas Rangers manager Doug Rader said the White Sox "...weren't playing well. They're winning ugly." This phrase became a rallying cry for the team, and they are often referred to as the "Winning Ugly" team (and their uniforms as the "Winning Ugly" uniforms).

1983 Major League Baseball season

The 1983 Major League Baseball season ended with the Baltimore Orioles defeating the Philadelphia Phillies in the fifth game of the World Series. Rick Dempsey was named MVP of the Series. The All-Star Game was held on July 6 at Comiskey Park; the American League won by a score of 13–3, with California Angels outfielder Fred Lynn being named MVP.

1984 Chicago White Sox season

The 1984 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 84th season in the major leagues, and their 85th season overall. They finished with a record 74-88, good enough for 5th place in the American League West, 10 games behind the 1st place Kansas City Royals.

The Sox' 1984 season is most famous for a 25-inning game on May 8, 1984, against the Milwaukee Brewers. The game was suspended after 17 innings at 1 a.m. It was completed the following night, with the White Sox winning 7-6 on Harold Baines's walk-off home run.

1985 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1985 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 56th playing of the game, annually played between the All-Stars of the National League and the All-Stars of the American League. The game was played on July 16, 1985, in the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome in Minneapolis, Minnesota, home of the Minnesota Twins.

1985 San Diego Padres season

The 1985 San Diego Padres season was the 17th season in franchise history. Led by manager Dick Williams, the Padres were unable to defend their National League championship.

1986 San Diego Padres season

The 1986 San Diego Padres season was the 18th season in franchise history.

Johnson City Cardinals

The Johnson City Cardinals are a Minor League Baseball team based in Johnson City, Tennessee. The Cardinals are affiliated with the St. Louis Cardinals organization and play with the Rookie Appalachian League. The team has won nine league championships, most recently in 2016. They play their home games at TVA Credit Union Ballpark.

Lamar (given name)

Lamar or Lamarr is the given name of:

Lamar Alexander (born 1940), American politician

Lamar Alford (born 1944), American actor and singer

LaMar Baker (1915-2003), American politician and businessman

Lamar Campbell (born 1976), American retired National Football League player

Lamar Campbell (musician) (born 1964), American gospel musician

Lamar Chapman (born 1976), American former National Football League player

Lamar Davis (1921-2014), American National Football League player

Lamar Dodd (1909-1996), American painter

Lamar Fisher, mayor of Pompano Beach, Florida, elected in 2007

Lamar Fontaine (1829-1921), American military veteran, surveyor, poet and author

Lamar Holmes (born 1989), American National Football League player

Lamar Hoover (1887-1944), American college football player and coach

Lamarr Houston (born 1987), American National Football League player

LaMarr Hoyt (born 1955), former Major League Baseball pitcher

Lamar Hunt (1932-2006), American founder of several sports leagues, owner of various teams and sports promoter, member of several sports' halls of fame

Lamar Jackson (born 1997), American football player

Lamar Johnson, American baseball player and coach

Lamar Johnson (actor), Canadian actor and dancer

Lamar King (born 1975), American retired National Football League player

Lamar Lathon (born 1967), American retired National Football League player

Lamar Lemmons, Jr., American politician

Lamar Lundy (1935-2007), American National Football League player

Lamar McGriggs (born 1968), American retired National Football League and Canadian Football League player

Lamar McHan (1932-1998), American National Football League quarterback

Lamar Miller (born 1991), American National Football League player

Lamar Neagle (born 1987), American Major League Soccer player

Lamar Odom (born 1979), American National Basketball Association player

Lamar Patterson (born 1991), American basketball player

Lamar Powell (born 1993), English footballer

Lamar Reynolds (born 1995), English footballer

Lamar Rogers (born 1967), American retired National Football League player

Lamar S. Smith (born 1947), American politician

Lamar "Ditney" Smith (1892–1955), African-American civil rights activist and murder victim

Lamar Smith (born 1970), American retired National Football League player

Lamar Stevens (born 1997), American basketball player

Lamar Trotti (1900-1952), American movie screenwriter, producer and executive

Lamar Williams (1949-1983), American musician, bassist for The Allman Brothers Band

LaMarr Woodley (born 1984), American National Football League player

Lamarr Altmon (Born 1988), United States Army Veteran

List of Chicago White Sox team records

This is a list of team records for the Chicago White Sox professional baseball team.

List of Major League Baseball All-Star Games

Ninety Major League Baseball All-Star Games have been played since the inaugural one in 1933. The American League (AL) leads the series with 45 victories, and a 373–370 run advantage; two games ended in ties. The National League (NL) has the longest winning streak of 11 games from 1972–1982; the AL held a 13-game unbeaten streak from 1997–2009 (including a tie in 2002). The AL previously dominated from 1933 to 1949, winning 12 of the first 16. The NL dominated from 1950 to 1987, winning 33 of 42 with 1 tie, including a stretch from 1963 to 1982 when they won 19 of 20. Since 1988 the AL has dominated, winning 24 of 31 with one tie. In 2018 the AL took their first lead in the series since 1963.

The "home team" has traditionally been the league in which the host franchise plays its games, however the AL was designated the home team for the 2016 All-Star Game, despite it being played in Petco Park, home of the National League's San Diego Padres. This decision was made following the announcement of Miami as host for the 2017 All-Star Game, which was the third consecutive year in which the game is hosted in an NL ballpark. The criteria for choosing the venue are subjective; for the most part, cities with new parks and cities who have not hosted the game in a long time—or ever—tend to get the nod. In the first two decades of the game there were two pairs of teams that shared ballparks, located in Philadelphia and St. Louis. This led to some shorter-than-usual gaps between the use of those venues: The Cardinals hosted the game in 1940, and the Browns in 1948. The Athletics hosted the game in 1943, and the Phillies in 1952.

A second game was played for four seasons, from 1959 through 1962. The All-Star Game Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award was introduced in 1962 and the first recipient was Maury Wills of the Los Angeles Dodgers. The 2008 game featured the longest All-Star Game by time: 4 hours 50 minutes, and tied for innings at 15 with the 1967 game.

Major League Baseball All-Star Game Most Valuable Player Award

The Major League Baseball All-Star Game Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award is an annual Major League Baseball (MLB) award which is presented to the most outstanding player in each year's MLB All-Star Game. Awarded each season since 1962 (two games were held and an award was presented to each game winner in 1962), it was originally called the "Arch Ward Memorial Award" in honor of Arch Ward, the man who conceived of the All-Star Game in 1933. The award's name was changed to the "Commissioner's Trophy" in 1970 (two National League (NL) players were presented the award in 1975), but this name change was reversed in 1985 when the World Series Trophy was renamed the Commissioner's Trophy. Finally, the trophy was renamed the Ted Williams Most Valuable Player Award in 2002, in honor of former Boston Red Sox player Ted Williams, who had died earlier that year. No award was presented for the 2002 All-Star Game, which ended in a tie. Thus, the Anaheim Angels' Garret Anderson was the first recipient of the newly named Ted Williams Award in 2003. The All-Star Game Most Valuable Player also receives a Chevrolet vehicle, choosing between two cars.As of 2018, NL players have won the award 27 times (including one award shared by two players), and American League (AL) players have won 30 times. Baltimore Orioles players have won the most awards for a single franchise (with six); players from the Cincinnati Reds, Los Angeles Dodgers and San Francisco Giants are tied for the most in the NL with five each. Five players have won the award twice: Willie Mays (1963, 1968), Steve Garvey (1974, 1978), Gary Carter (1981, 1984), Cal Ripken, Jr. (1991, 2001), and Mike Trout (2014, 2015, becoming the only player to win the award in back-to-back years). The award has been shared by multiple players once; Bill Madlock and Jon Matlack shared the award in 1975. Two players have won the award for a game in which their league lost: Brooks Robinson in 1966 and Carl Yastrzemski in 1970. One pair of awardees were father and son (Ken Griffey Sr. and Ken Griffey Jr.), and another were brothers (Roberto Alomar and Sandy Alomar, Jr.). Three players have won the MVP award at a game played in their home ballpark (Sandy Alomar, Jr. in 1997, Pedro Martínez in 1999, and Shane Bieber in 2019).

Shane Bieber of the Cleveland Indians is the most recent MLB All-Star Game MVP, winning the award in 2019. Only six players have won the MVP award in their only All-Star Game appearance; LaMarr Hoyt, Bo Jackson, J. D. Drew, Melky Cabrera, Eric Hosmer, and Bieber.

Richard Dotson

Richard Elliott Dotson (born January 10, 1959) is a former right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball in the 1980s. He is best noted for his 22-7 performance of 1983, helping the Chicago White Sox win the American League West Division championship that season. Dotson finished fourth in the American League Cy Young Award voting, behind teammate LaMarr Hoyt. Arm injuries came to limit, however, what was a promising baseball career.In a 12-season career, Rich Dotson recorded a record of 111-113 with a 4.23 ERA in 305 games, 295 of them starts. He pitched 55 complete games and 11 shutouts in his career. Dotson gave up 872 earned runs and struck out 973 in 1857 and 1/3 innings pitched.

Dotson was born in Cincinnati and attended Anderson High School.

He was drafted out of high school by the California Angels in the summer of 1977, but traded that December in a blockbuster six-player deal, going to the Chicago White Sox along with Bobby Bonds and Thad Bosley in exchange for Brian Downing, Dave Frost and Chris Knapp.

His debut in the majors was not an auspicious one. White Sox manager Tony La Russa handed him the ball on September 4, 1979 as the starter for a game at Anaheim, but the 20-year-old Dotson retired only four Angels and left the park that day with a gaudy earned-run average of 33.75.

By the next season, Dotson was a 12-game winner in the Chicago rotation. In 1981, he led the American League in shutouts with four. But his breakout season definitely was 1983. Dotson's 22 wins were the second-most in the league, and included 14 complete games. On the final day of the regular season, he and Dennis Lamp combined for a shutout at Seattle that put the White Sox in first place by a whopping 20 games over the nearest contender.

He and the Sox did not make it to the World Series, dropping the 1983 American League Championship Series to the Baltimore Orioles three games to one. Dotson became an All-Star the following summer, working two scoreless innings in the 1984 All-Star Game at Candlestick Park.

Although his career never again reached those heights, Dotson did go 12-9 in the New York Yankees' rotation in 1988. The team was in first place for much of the season's first half, including in late July, before fading. Dotson had a strong finish, combining with two relievers on September 29 for a seven-hitter at Baltimore in his final start of the season.

Dotson served as the pitching coach for the Charlotte Knights for nine seasons before becoming the pitching coordinator for their Major League affiliate, the Chicago White Sox.

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