LaGrange, New York

LaGrange (/ləˈɡreɪndʒ/ lə-GRAYNJ) is a town in Dutchess County, New York, United States. The population was 15,730 at the 2010 census.[3] The town was named after the ancestral estate of the wife of the Marquis de Lafayette.[4]

LaGrange, New York
Town Hall
Town Hall
Location of LaGrange, New York
Location of LaGrange, New York
Coordinates: 41°40′23″N 73°48′24″W / 41.67306°N 73.80667°WCoordinates: 41°40′23″N 73°48′24″W / 41.67306°N 73.80667°W
CountryUnited States
StateNew York
CountyDutchess
Government
 • TypeTown Council
 • Town SupervisorAlan Bell (R)
 • Town Council
Area
 • Total40.35 sq mi (104.51 km2)
 • Land39.88 sq mi (103.29 km2)
 • Water0.47 sq mi (1.22 km2)
Elevation
318 ft (97 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total15,730
 • Estimate 
(2016)[2]
15,634
 • Density392.04/sq mi (151.36/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
12540,12603, 12569
Area code(s)845
FIPS code36-027-40299
GNIS feature ID0979126
Websitelagrangeny.gov

History

LaGrange District School, Freedom Plains, NY
Old LaGrange District School, in Freedom Plains

The town was originally established in 1821 as "Freedom" from parts of the towns of Beekman and Fishkill, but confusion with another location caused the name to be changed to "LaGrange" in 1828.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 40.3 square miles (104.5 km2), of which 39.9 square miles (103.3 km2) is land and 0.46 square miles (1.2 km2), or 1.17%, is water.[3] The town of LaGrange is located within the Hudson Valley region of New York. The towns bordering LaGrange are Union Vale to the east, Beekman to the southeast, East Fishkill and Wappinger to the south, Poughkeepsie to the west, and Pleasant Valley to the north, with a small part of Washington also bordering LaGrange.

Roads

Three state highways bisect the town and connect it with other towns in Dutchess County and the surrounding area. The Taconic State Parkway is a north-south parkway through LaGrange. James Baird State Park, which provides a golf course, playground, sports fields, and hiking and cycling trails, is located in LaGrange along the Taconic Parkway. The parkway also serves as an important commuter road for LaGrange, connecting the town to points south, including White Plains 51 miles (82 km) and New York City, 75 miles (121 km) to the south.

New York State Route 55 is an east-west road that goes through the center of the town; Arlington High School, the Freedom Plains Presbyterian Church, and multiple shops and stores are located on a two-mile section of Route 55 in Freedom Plains, a hamlet of LaGrange. In the summer and fall of 2014, three traffic circles were added to this stretch of Route 55 in Freedom Plains in an effort to ease congestion and also to beautify this part of LaGrange. To the west, Route 55 connects LaGrange to the city of Poughkeepsie, the closest urbanized area to LaGrange, ; to the east, Route 55 connects LaGrange to the town of Pawling and the Route 22 corridor. It is located halfway between Poughkeepsie and Pawling, about 11 miles (18 km) from both.

New York State Route 82 is a highway that goes southwest-northeast through the town, from Hopewell Junction to Moores Mills. Route 82 connects LaGrange with Millbrook to the north and Hopewell Junction to the south.

There are also several county roads that go in various parts of the town.

Parks and recreation

Freedom Park is the largest and most extensive park belonging to the town of LaGrange. At the park, there is a small, spring-fed lake in which patrons are permitted to swim under the supervision of Red Cross-trained lifeguards. There is a set of eight 25-yard lap lanes that enables the town to support a swim team. There is a concession that sells snacks at the lake. Freedom Park also boasts a bandstand and a large, permanent, open-air pavilion; there is a small playground as well. Each summer, a day camp is offered by the town at Freedom Park.

Other parks in LaGrange include Stringham Park, an extensive complex of soccer fields located on Stringham Road in the west of the town, and James Baird State Park, which provides a golf course, playground, and cycling and hiking trails.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18302,044
18401,851−9.4%
18501,9414.9%
18601,850−4.7%
18701,774−4.1%
18801,745−1.6%
18901,463−16.2%
19001,304−10.9%
19101,3503.5%
19201,132−16.1%
19301,2106.9%
19401,63835.4%
19502,28039.2%
19606,079166.6%
197010,90279.3%
198012,37513.5%
199013,2747.3%
200014,92812.5%
201015,7305.4%
Est. 201615,634[2]−0.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 14,928 people, 5,085 households, and 4,103 families residing in the town. The population density was 376.0 people per square mile (145.2/km²). There were 5,240 housing units at an average density of 132.0 per square mile (51.0/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 91.98% White, 2.41% African American, 0.12% Native American, 2.94% Asian, 1.14% from other races, and 1.41% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.26% of the population.

There were 5,085 households out of which 40.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.2% were married couples living together, 6.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.3% were non-families. 15.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.93 and the average family size was 3.28.

In the town, the population was spread out with 28.5% under the age of 18, 5.9% from 18 to 24, 29.9% from 25 to 44, 25.3% from 45 to 64, and 10.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.0 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $74,881, and the median income for a family was $80,724. Males had a median income of $61,806 versus $36,955 for females. The per capita income for the town was $27,872. About 1.7% of families and 3.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.2% of those under age 18 and 2.4% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people

Communities and locations in LaGrange

  • Arthursburg – A hamlet at the south town line.
  • Billings – A hamlet north of LaGrangeville.
  • Freedom Plains – A hamlet northwest of LaGrangeville.
  • James Baird State Park – A state park in the north part of the town.
  • LaGrangeville (or La Grangeville)– A hamlet in the southeast part of the town.[7]
    • LaGrangeville is an area in LaGrange with the zip code of 12540. As of 2014, this area had a population of 8,221, which makes it the largest part of LaGrange.
  • Manchester Bridge – A hamlet in the western part of the town.
  • Moores Mill – A location in the northeast part of the town.
  • Noxon – A location west of LaGrangeville.
  • Rombout Ridge – A location near the west town line.
  • Titus – A hamlet near the west town line.

Arlington High School and LaGrange Middle School of the Arlington Central School District are in LaGrange, as are several of the School District's primary, elementary and intermediate schools.

References

  1. ^ "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jul 4, 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): La Grange town, Dutchess County, New York". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved November 12, 2015.
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Government Printing Office. p. 179.
  5. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  6. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  7. ^ "LaGrangeville". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.

External links

Allendale station (NJ Transit)

Allendale is a NJ Transit rail station served by its Main and Bergen County lines as well as Port Jervis Line trains (operated by NJ Transit for Metro-North Railroad). The station is located at the railroad next to Allendale, Park and Myrtle avenues in Downtown Allendale. The station consists of two low-level platforms serving trains heading between Hoboken Terminal and Suffern. Some westbound trains headed for Port Jervis also stop at Allendale. The station has two ticket vending machines along the inbound platform with three parking lots for commuters. The railroad depot, constructed in 1870, is a combined passenger and freight depot, with a waiting area for passengers at the south end of the building while the northern end is unused.

Service at Allendale began c. 1850 when Joseph Mallinson donated some of his land in the area so the Paterson and Ramapo Railroad could build a depot. Service was ended in 1857 when the depot fell into disrepair, but returned in 1859, when Mallinson repaired the building. A new board and batten station replaced the Mallinson structure in 1870. The station was moved across the tracks to its current location in 1902 due to complaints about its condition. The passenger underpass constructed at Allendale was added in 1939 as part of the removal of several at-grade road crossings in the village.

Anthony Van Wyck

Anthony Van Wyck was a member of the Wisconsin State Senate.

Arlington Central School District Board of Education v. Murphy

Arlington Central School District Board of Education v. Murphy, 548 U.S. 291 (2006), was a United States Supreme Court case about experts' fees in cases commenced under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Justice Samuel Alito, writing for the majority, ruled that IDEA does not authorize the payment of the experts' fees of the prevailing parents. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg concurred in part, and in the judgment. Justices David Souter and Stephen Breyer filed dissents.

Arlington High School

Arlington High School can refer to one of several American high schools:

Arlington High School (California), Riverside, California

Arlington High School (Illinois), Arlington Heights, Illinois

Arlington High School (Indiana), Indianapolis, Indiana

Arlington High School (Massachusetts), Arlington, Massachusetts

Arlington Senior High School, Saint Paul, Minnesota

Arlington High School (Nebraska), Arlington, Nebraska

Arlington High School (New York), LaGrange, New York

Arlington High School (Ohio), Arlington, Ohio

Arlington High School (Oregon), Arlington, Oregon

Arlington High School (Tennessee), Arlington, Tennessee

Arlington High School (Texas), Arlington, Texas

Arlington High School (Washington), Arlington, Washington

Arlington High School (New York)

Arlington High School is a public high school in the Arlington Central School District located in Lagrangeville, New York, United States, on Route 55.

Caroline Morgan Clowes

Caroline Morgan Clowes (March 3, 1838 – November 16, 1904) was a Hudson River School painter who, at a time when that particular style was declining in popularity, earned accolades by depicting farm animals, frequently cattle, drawn from the vicinity of the home of the extended family that had adopted her, Heartsease, in LaGrange, Dutchess County, New York.

George Tarantini

George Tarantini was an Argentine retired men's soccer head coach at North Carolina State University. He served as head coach from 1986 to 2010 and posted a 221–190–41 record.

Tarantini earned Atlantic Coast Conference Coach of the Year honors in both 1992 and 1994. He also was the NCAA regional coach of the year in 1994. He has directed North Carolina State to eight NCAA Tournament bids. Tarantini has won more games with North Carolina State than any other coach in school history.

Tarantini's 1990 North Carolina State team won the ACC championship, and reached the Final Four, before losing to UCLA on penalty kicks. North Carolina State ended the 1990 season with a 17–4–2 record, the best in school history.

Tarantini started his coaching career in 1976 at Arlington High School in LaGrange, New York. From 1977 to 1980, he served as an assistant coach at Dutchess Community College in New York. Tarantini was an assistant coach at North Carolina State from 1982 to 1985. He now serves as the Assistant Coach for St. David's School in Raleigh.

His brother Alberto Tarantini is a former professional footballer.

Isaac R. Harrington

Isaac R. "Cuff" Harrington (1789–1851) was mayor of Buffalo, New York, serving in 1841–1842. He was born in 1789 and came to Buffalo around 1832. He purchased the land along Main and Court Streets and built homes on this property. His home was No. 3 Court Street. In 1833, Harrington purchased the Eagle Tavern from Benjamin Rathbun; one of the best known taverns in the country.On March 2, 1841, Harrington was elected as a Whig over Ira A. Blossom. His term ended March 8, 1842. On May 5, 1849, he was appointed to the position of Postmaster of Buffalo and held that position until his death, August 20, 1851. He was buried in Forest Lawn Cemetery.

Kathleen Murphy (martial artist)

Kathleen Murphy (born April 13, 1979), known as Katie Murphy, is an American martial artist. She is a twenty-two time World Champion in karate, a fifteen-time U.S. National Champion, and a ten-time New York State Champion.

List of unsolved murders

This list of unsolved murders includes notable cases where victims have been murdered under unknown circumstances.

Mike Cole (baseball)

Michael J. Cole is an American college baseball coach and former third baseman. He is the head baseball coach of Manhattan College. Cole played college baseball at the University of Vermont from 1998 to 2001 for coach Bill Currier.

Musical Arts Conference

The Musical Arts Conference or MAC is a local circuit for marching band competitions, based in Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Massachusetts. The conference was formed in 2001. Band class is arranged by the total number of instrumentalists (band proper, pit and percussion) and drum majors. The color guard is not included in the total number of performers (only for classification purposes). The smallest bands are assigned to Class 1 and the largest bands are assigned to Class 5, with a rubric to determine each class size.

In addition to marching band, MAC also hosts winter guard and winter percussion competitions. There are several classifications in both guard and percussion, which is broken up by the ability and talent of the units, and not by size.

Persis Goodale Thurston Taylor

Persis Goodale Thurston Taylor (1821–1906) was a painter and sketch artist who was born in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, on September 28, 1821.

Pierre A. Barker

Pierre Augustus Barker (April 17, 1790 – January 4, 1870) was an American mayor of Buffalo, New York, serving in 1837–1838.

He was born in LaGrange, New York. In 1812 he married Annache G. Livingston; they had eight children. He arrived in Buffalo around 1829 or 1830 and, a wealthy man, purchased many properties in and around the village. Shortly after his arrival he was appointed collector of customs for the port of Buffalo, and held the position from 1830 to 1838. He was one of the founders of the first Bank of Buffalo in 1831. He served as president of the Commercial bank in 1835 or 1836. The Commercial Bank was incorporated in Upper Canada on January 28, 1831.

In 1838 or 1840, Pierre A. Barker was president of the United States Bank at Buffalo.

In 1837, Barker held the office of Alderman for the 5th ward and lived in a mansion on Hudson Street. He was selected as acting mayor on December 21, 1837, after Josiah Trowbridge resigned. He immediately took to trying to calm the unrest in the city due to the Canadian revolutionary movement, or "Patriot War". His term ended in 1838 and sometime after 1841 Barker left Buffalo and moved to Natchez, Mississippi.

Poughkeepsie High School

Poughkeepsie High School is the public high school (grades 9-12) in the city of Poughkeepsie, New York. It is categorized as an inner city school district as a result of the high percentage of students living in low-income households. In the 2014-2015 school year, 73% of students were eligible for free or reduced-price lunch. PHS did not meet the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) specified by the No Child Left Behind Act in 2011-12. Poughkeepsie High School is currently the only 9-12 school within the Poughkeepsie City School District.

In 2014-15, there were 1,137 students enrolled in the High School, with an average class size of 20. The student:teacher ratio was approximately 13:1. The attendance rate in the 2013-2014 school year was 93%, and the suspension rate in that same year was 22%. 30% of teachers have their Masters Degree plus 30 Hours or Doctorate.Poughkeepsie High School also hosts a first-of-its-kind program with the Dutchess County Regional Chamber of Commerce. This program has staff from the Chamber of Commerce teaching alongside a PHS teacher in the classroom. Students are taught job and career skills as well as enhanced typing. Students in the class also have an opportunity to network with local business owners. The Chamber of Commerce and High School host monthly gatherings with students from the class in which they participate in bonding activities with the local business owners. This public-private partnership with the Dutchess County Regional Chamber of Commerce gives Poughkeepsie High School students access to a greater pool of resources and a chance for highly effective community outreach.

Saint Kateri Tekakwitha Church (LaGrangeville, New York)

Saint Kateri Tekakwitha Church (LaGrangeville, New York) is a Roman Catholic parish church located in Lagrangeville, Dutchess County, under the authority of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York. It was established as a mission of St. Columba in Hopewell Junction in 1998 before being elevated to parish status in 2002. The church was built 2006-2008.

Titusville, New York

Titusville is a hamlet and census-designated place in the town of LaGrange, New York, in Dutchess County. As of the 2010 census, it had a population of 811.Titusville is in the southwestern part of the town of LaGrange, 5 miles (8 km) southeast of the city of Poughkeepsie. It is bordered to the south by the hamlet of Red Oaks Mill. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the Titusville CDP has an area of 0.69 square miles (1.8 km2), all of it land.

ZIP Code

A ZIP Code is a postal code used by the United States Postal Service (USPS). Introduced in 1963, the basic format consists of five digits. In 1983, an extended ZIP+4 code was introduced; it includes the five digits of the ZIP Code, followed by a hyphen and four digits that designate a more specific location.

The term ZIP is an acronym for Zone Improvement Plan; it was chosen to suggest that the mail travels more efficiently and quickly (zipping along) when senders use the code in the postal address. The term ZIP Code was originally registered as a servicemark by the USPS, but its registration expired in 1997.

Municipalities and communities of Dutchess County, New York, United States
Cities
Towns
Villages
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Other
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Footnotes
Hudson River watershed
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