Kyodo News

Kyodo News (共同通信社 Kyōdō Tsūshinsha) is a nonprofit cooperative news agency based in Minato, Tokyo. It was established in November 1945 and it distributes news to almost all newspapers, and radio and television networks in Japan. The newspapers using its news have about 50 million subscribers. K. K. Kyodo News is Kyodo News' business arm, established in 1972.[1] The subdivision Kyodo News International, founded in 1982, provides over 200 reports to international news media and is located in Rockefeller Center, New York City.[1]

Their online news site is in Japanese, Chinese (Simplified and Traditional), Korean, and English.

The agency employs over 1,000 journalists and photographers, and maintains news exchange agreements with over 70 international media outlets.[1]

Satoshi Ishikawa is the news agency's president.[2]

Kyodo News was formed by Furunu Inosuke, the president of the Domei News Agency, following the dissolution of Domei after World War II.[3]

Kyodo News is the only remaining news agency to transmit news via radiofax. It broadcasts complete newspapers in Japanese and English, often at 60 lines per minute instead of the more normal 120 because of the greater complexity of written Japanese.

A full day's news takes hours to transmit. Kyodo has a dedicated transmission to Pacific fishing fleets from Kagoshima Prefectural Fishery Radio, and a relay from 9VF, possibly still in the Netherlands. The frequencies formerly used by JJC radio outside Tokyo are now sent from an unknown location, using the same identification in Japanese as 9VF. They are still active and heard daily in 2017.

Shiodome Media Tower
Shiodome Media Tower, headquarters of Kyodo News in Minato, Tokyo, Japan

See also

  • Emblem-money.svg Economics portal
  • Newspaper nicu buculei 01.svg Journalism portal
  • A coloured voting box.svg Politics portal

References

  1. ^ a b c Shrivastava, K. M. (2007). News agencies from pigeon to internet. Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd. p. 208. ISBN 978-1-932705-67-6.
  2. ^ "Kyodo News names General Manager Ishikawa as new president." Kyodo News International. May 26, 2005.
  3. ^ Haru Matsukata Reischauer, "Samurai and Silk: A Japanese and American Heritage", Harvard University Press, 1986, page 310

External links

Kyodo News

K. K. Kyodo News

2004 Nippon Professional Baseball realignment

The 2004 Nippon Professional Baseball realignment was the cause of the first and only work stoppage in Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB) history. The dispute resulted from the proposed realignment of Japan’s professional baseball into a one-league format, and the proposed mergers of four of the ball clubs. The two-day strike occurred on the weekend of September 18–19, 2004.

2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami

The 2011 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tōhoku (東北地方太平洋沖地震, Tōhoku-chihō Taiheiyō Oki Jishin) was a magnitude 9.0–9.1 (Mw) undersea megathrust earthquake off the coast of Japan that occurred at 14:46 JST (05:46 UTC) on Friday 11 March 2011, with the epicentre approximately 70 kilometres (43 mi) east of the Oshika Peninsula of Tōhoku and the hypocenter at an underwater depth of approximately 29 km (18 mi).

The earthquake is often referred to in Japan as the Great East Japan Earthquake (東日本大震災, Higashi nihon daishinsai) and is also known as the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake, the Great Sendai Earthquake, the Great Tōhoku Earthquake, and the 3.11 earthquake.

It was the most powerful earthquake ever recorded in Japan, and the fourth most powerful earthquake in the world since modern record-keeping began in 1900.

The earthquake triggered powerful tsunami waves that may have reached heights of up to 40.5 metres (133 ft) in Miyako in Tōhoku's Iwate Prefecture, and which, in the Sendai area, traveled up to 10 km (6 mi) inland.The earthquake moved Honshu (the main island of Japan) 2.4 m (8 ft) east, shifted the Earth on its axis by estimates of between 10 cm (4 in) and 25 cm (10 in), increased earth's rotational speed by 1.8 µs per day, and generated infrasound waves detected in perturbations of the low-orbiting GOCE satellite.

Initially, the earthquake caused sinking of part of Honshu's Pacific coast by up to roughly a metre, but after about three years, the coast rose back and kept on rising to exceed its original height.The tsunami swept the Japanese mainland and killed over ten thousand people, mainly through drowning, though blunt trauma also caused many deaths. The latest report from the Japanese National Police Agency report confirms 15,897 deaths, 6,157 injured, and 2,533 people missing across twenty prefectures, and a report from 2015 indicated 228,863 people were still living away from their home in either temporary housing or due to permanent relocation.A report by the National Police Agency of Japan on 10 September 2018 listed 121,778 buildings as "total collapsed", with a further 280,926 buildings "half collapsed", and another 699,180 buildings "partially damaged". The earthquake and tsunami also caused extensive and severe structural damage in north-eastern Japan, including heavy damage to roads and railways as well as fires in many areas, and a dam collapse. Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan said, "In the 65 years after the end of World War II, this is the toughest and the most difficult crisis for Japan." Around 4.4 million households in northeastern Japan were left without electricity and 1.5 million without water.The tsunami caused nuclear accidents, primarily the level 7 meltdowns at three reactors in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant complex, and the associated evacuation zones affecting hundreds of thousands of residents. Many electrical generators were taken down, and at least three nuclear reactors suffered explosions due to hydrogen gas that had built up within their outer containment buildings after cooling system failure resulting from the loss of electrical power. Residents within a 20 km (12 mi) radius of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and a 10 km (6.2 mi) radius of the Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Plant were evacuated.

Early estimates placed insured losses from the earthquake alone at US$14.5 to $34.6 billion. The Bank of Japan offered ¥15 trillion (US$183 billion) to the banking system on 14 March in an effort to normalize market conditions. The World Bank's estimated economic cost was US$235 billion, making it the costliest natural disaster in history.

2012 Japanese general election

A general election was held in Japan on 16 December 2012. Voters gave the Liberal Democratic Party a landslide victory, ejecting the Democratic Party from power after three years. It was the fourth worst defeat suffered by a ruling party in Japanese history.

Voting took place in all representatives' constituencies of Japan including proportional blocks, in order to appoint Members of Diet to seats in the House of Representatives, the lower house of the National Diet of Japan. This was the 46th general election of members of the House of Representatives (第46回衆議院議員総選挙, dai-yonjūrokkai Shūgiin giin sōsenkyo) in Japan since 1869.

In July 2012 it was reported that the deputy prime minister Katsuya Okada had approached the Liberal Democratic Party to sound them out about dissolving the house of representatives and holding the election in January 2013. An agreement was reached in August to dissolve the Diet and hold early elections "shortly" following the passage of a bill to raise the national consumption tax. It was reported that as the result of introducing the consumption tax to repay the Japan public debt, the DPJ lost around 75% of its pre-election seats.

2018 Northeast Asia heat wave

Throughout much of July 2018, a record-breaking heat wave affected large areas of Japan, Korean peninsula, China. Many areas in Japan experienced temperatures in excess of 35 °C (95 °F), and Kumagaya recorded a maximum temperature of 41.1 °C (106.0 °F) on 23 July – the highest ever observed in the country.

Akashi pedestrian bridge accident

The Akashi pedestrian bridge accident (明石歩道橋事故, Akashi hodōkyō jiko) was a human stampede that occurred on 21 July 2001 in Akashi, Hyōgo, Japan. In the incident, a large crowd of people packed into a partially enclosed pedestrian overpass leading to Asagiri Station after a fireworks show. The resulting crush killed 11 people, including two adults and nine children, and injured 247 others. Five civic and security officials were later convicted of professional negligence for not preventing the disaster.

Athletics at the 2002 Asian Games – Women's 1500 metres

The women's 1500 metres competition at the 2002 Asian Games in Busan, South Korea was held on 10 October at the Busan Asiad Main Stadium.

On October 13, 2002, Japanese news agency Kyodo News reported that Sunita Rani of India had tested positive for a banned substance, which was later confirmed by Lee Choon-Sup, Deputy Secretary General of the Busan Asian Games Organizing Committee; an unofficial report stated that the substance was the anabolic steroid nandrolone. The Indian Chef de Mission at the Games backed Sunita—who denied using any banned drug—and asked for a "B" sample test from Bangkok, but tests were run only at the Asian Games’ Doping Control Center (AGDCC) in Seoul (the laboratory accredited by the IOC). On October 16, the AGDCC confirmed the steroid nandrolone in Sunita's urine sample; as a consequence, the OCA stripped her medal. The Indian Olympic Association (IOA) requested the intervention of the International Association of Athletics Federations and the IOC; the samples were jointly reexamined by the World Anti-Doping Agency and the IOC Sub-Commission on Doping and Biochemistry of Sport. In January 2003, the OCA announced that the IOC Medical Director had cleared Sunita of the doping charge and that appropriate action would be taken against the AGDCC. Her medal was reinstated on February 4, 2003, in a ceremony attended by the Secretary General of OCA Randhir Singh and the president of the IOA Suresh Kalmadi.

Athletics at the 2002 Asian Games – Women's 5000 metres

The women's 5000 metres competition at the 2002 Asian Games in Busan, South Korea was held on 12 October at the Busan Asiad Main Stadium.

On October 13, 2002, Japanese news agency Kyodo News reported that Sunita Rani of India had tested positive for a banned substance, which was later confirmed by Lee Choon-Sup, Deputy Secretary General of the Busan Asian Games Organizing Committee; an unofficial report stated that the substance was the anabolic steroid nandrolone. The Indian Chef de Mission at the Games backed Sunita—who denied using any banned drug—and asked for a "B" sample test from Bangkok, but tests were run only at the Asian Games’ Doping Control Center (AGDCC) in Seoul (the laboratory accredited by the IOC). On October 16, the AGDCC confirmed the steroid nandrolone in Sunita's urine sample; as a consequence, the OCA stripped her medal. The Indian Olympic Association (IOA) requested the intervention of the International Association of Athletics Federations and the IOC; the samples were jointly reexamined by the World Anti-Doping Agency and the IOC Sub-Commission on Doping and Biochemistry of Sport. In January 2003, the OCA announced that the IOC Medical Director had cleared Sunita of the doping charge and that appropriate action would be taken against the AGDCC. Her medal was reinstated on February 4, 2003, in a ceremony attended by the Secretary General of OCA Randhir Singh and the president of the IOA Suresh Kalmadi.

César Rwagasana

César Rwagasana is a Rwandan competitive swimmer.

He was the first person to represent Rwanda at the Paralympics, when he was the country's sole representative at the 2000 Summer Paralympics in Sydney. He had trained in Lake Tanganyika. He competed in the 50m freestyle (S10 category), and swam the length of the pool in 42.39s, finishing last, 13.7s behind the second slowest swimmer. It was his only participation in the Paralympic Games.Although Kyodo News International incorrectly reported that he had lost his left leg during the Rwandan genocide, he was actually missing his right leg, and Rwagasana himself told the Daily Telegraph that he had been born without it.

Ehime Maru and USS Greeneville collision

On 9 February 2001, about 9 nautical miles (17 km) south of Oahu, Hawaii, the United States Navy (USN) Los Angeles-class submarine USS Greeneville (SSN-772) collided with the Japanese-fishery high-school training ship Ehime Maru (えひめ丸) from Ehime Prefecture. In a demonstration for some VIP civilian visitors, Greeneville performed an emergency ballast-blow surfacing maneuver. As the submarine shot to the surface, she struck Ehime Maru. Within 10 minutes of the collision, Ehime Maru sank. Nine of the people on board were killed: four high-school students, two teachers, and three crewmembers.

Many Japanese, including government officials, were concerned over news that civilians were present in Greeneville's control room at the time of the accident. Some expressed anger because of a perception that the submarine did not try to assist Ehime Maru's survivors and that the submarine's captain, Commander Scott Waddle, did not apologize immediately afterwards. The Navy conducted a public court of inquiry, placed blame on Waddle and other members of Greeneville's crew, and dealt non-judicial punishment or administrative disciplinary action to the captain and some crew members. After Commander Waddle had faced the Naval Board of Inquiry, it was decided that a full court-martial would be unnecessary, and he was forced to retire and given an honorable discharge.

In response to requests from the families of Ehime Maru's victims and the government of Japan, the USN raised Ehime Maru from the ocean floor in October 2001 and moved her to shallow water near Oahu. Once there, Navy and Japanese divers located and retrieved the remains of eight of the nine victims from the wreck. Ehime Maru was then moved back out to sea and scuttled in deep water. The Navy compensated the government of Ehime Prefecture, Ehime Maru's survivors, and victims' family members for the accident. Waddle traveled to Japan in December 2002 to apologize to the ship's survivors and victims' families.

The accident renewed calls by many in Japan for the United States to make more effort in reducing crimes and accidents involving U.S. military personnel who injure or kill Japanese citizens. In response to the accident, the Navy changed its policies regarding civilian visits to its ships.

Genichiro Sata

Genichiro Sata (佐田 玄一郎, Sata Gen'ichirō, born December 22, 1952 in Maebashi, Gunma) is a Japanese politician serving in the House of Representatives of Japan as a member of the Liberal Democratic Party. He is the Chairman of the Committee on Rules and Administration. He was elected by the first district of the Japanese prefecture of Gunma. In 2005, he was the Chief Deputy Secretary General of the Liberal Democratic Party.

According to Kyodo News International, in 1999 he received JPY8 million in political donations from the construction company of his father by channeling the money through political organizations. Individual politicians in Japan are banned from receiving more than 500,000 a year until 1999, after which all corporate donations were banned, but there was no such ban on donations by political organizations. On 27 December 2006 he resigned as a result of this scandal from his position as state minister in charge of administrative reform, only 3 months after being appointed by Prime Minister Shinzō Abe.

Harumafuji Kōhei

Harumafuji Kōhei (日馬富士 公平, born April 14, 1984, as Davaanyamyn Byambadorj, Mongolian: Даваанямын Бямбадорж), previously known as Ama Kōhei, is a retired sumo wrestler. He received his promotion to yokozuna, sumo's highest rank, on September 26, 2012. He is the third Mongolian and fifth overall non-Japanese wrestler to attain yokozuna status.He began his professional career in 2001 and reached the top makuuchi division in 2004. He has won ten special prizes for his achievements in tournaments. In November 2008 he became the seventh foreign-born wrestler in sumo history to reach the second-highest rank of ōzeki. In May 2009, he won his first championship, winning the natsu basho (summer tournament). He has won a total of nine top division championships, three of them with a perfect record.

At 133 kg (293 lb), Harumafuji was the lightest man in the top division as of September 2015. He is noted for his technical skill.

Harumafuji admitted to assaulting fellow Mongolian wrestler Takanoiwa during a regional sumo tour in late October 2017. He withdrew from the November 2017 basho shortly after the allegations surfaced. On November 29, 2017, his stablemaster, Isegahama, submitted Harumafuji's letter of resignation to the Japan Sumo Association.

Ishinomaki

Ishinomaki (石巻市, Ishinomaki-shi) is a city located in Miyagi Prefecture, Japan. As of 28 February 2017, the city has an estimated population of 146,993, and a population density of 269 persons per km2 in 61,233 households. The total area of the city is 554.58 square kilometres (214.12 sq mi).

Jiji Press

Jiji Press Ltd. (株式会社 時事通信社 Kabushiki gaisha Jiji Tsūshinsha) is a news agency in Japan.

List of Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles managers

The Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles are a professional baseball team based in Sendai, Miyagi, Japan. The Eagles are members of the Pacific League (PL) in Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB). In baseball, the head coach of a team is called the manager, or more formally, the field manager. The duties of the team manager include team strategy and leadership on and off the field. Since their inaugural season in 2005, the Eagles have employed seven managers. Under the franchise's first manager, Yasushi Tao, the team finished last in the PL. Tao's Eagles was the first PL team in 40 years to lose over 90 games in a single season. The next season Tao was replaced by Japanese Baseball Hall of Famer Katsuya Nomura. During his four-year managerial tenure, Nomura accumulated 256 wins and a .459 winning percentage. Despite leading the team to its first Climax Series appearance in 2009, Eagles' management decided not to renew Nomura's contract.Marty Brown, Nomura's successor, signed to a two-year managerial contract, however he was fired after only one last-place season with the Eagles. Instead, long-time manager Senichi Hoshino was hired and signed to a one-year, ¥150 million contract for the 2011 season. After a fifth-place PL finish and the positive development of the team's younger players, Golden Eagles owner Hiroshi Mikitani requested that Hoshino stay on as manager for the next few seasons. In the Eagles' ninth season, he went on to lead the team to the franchise's first PL pennant, first successful Climax Series run, and first Japan Series title in 2013. The following season, however, the Eagles finished in last place and Hoshino announced that he would stepping down as manager.Yosuke Hiraishi is currently the interim manager for the remainder of the 2018 season.

Michael Brown Okinawa assault incident

On November 2, 2002, U.S. Marine Corps Major Michael Brown attempted an indecent assault on a Filipina bartender in Okinawa, Japan. The bartender accused Brown of attempting to rape her and of throwing her cell phone into a nearby river; Brown denied the rape charges. The victim later recanted and attempted to withdraw the accusation, though prosecutors presented evidence that she had received a cash payment just before doing so.

The case received extensive attention in the Japanese media, especially in Okinawa, and the crime sparked a public debate over the U.S. military presence in Japan, the privileges of extraterritoriality, as well as the fair-trial practices of Japanese legal system and the Japanese police. The case involved the Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security Between the United States and Japan and the U.S.–Japan Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA).

On July 8, 2004, after a 19-month trial, Brown was convicted by a Japanese court of attempted indecent assault and destruction of private property and received a one-year suspended prison sentence. As a result of this incident and others involving crimes committed by U.S. military personnel in Japan, both countries entered into negotiations aimed at modifying the SOFA in July 2003; ultimately, no changes were made to the agreement. In 2005, Brown was arrested and charged with a separate kidnapping in the United States. He was demoted and involuntarily retired from the military in 2006 and at his trial in 2009 entered an Alford plea, receiving probation on the felony conviction.

Opinion polling for the next Japanese general election

In the run up to the next Japanese general election, various organisations are expected to carry out opinion polling to gauge voting intention. Results of such polls are displayed in this article. The date range for these opinion polls is from the previous general election, held on 22 October 2017, to the present day. The next election will be held on 22 October 2021, unless a snap election is called.

Oshika Peninsula

The Oshika Peninsula (牡鹿半島, Oshika-hantō) also pronounced "Ojika" is a peninsula which projects southeast into the Pacific Ocean from the coast of Miyagi Prefecture in northeast Honshu, the main island of Japan.

The peninsula is most often visited as the gateway to the island of Kinkasan, which can be accessed by ferries running from the coastal whaling port of Ayukawa in Ishinomaki, Miyagi and from Onagawa.

Shigeki Tanaka

Shigeki Tanaka (田中 茂樹, Tanaka Shigeki, born April 7, 1931) is a retired long-distance runner from Japan, and the winner of the 1951 Boston Marathon.

Yuzuru Hanyu

Yuzuru Hanyu (羽生結弦, Hanyū Yuzuru, born December 7, 1994) is a Japanese figure skater who competes in the men's singles discipline. He is a two-time Olympic champion (2014, 2018), a two-time World champion (2014, 2017), a four-time Grand Prix Final champion (2013–2016), a three-time Four Continents silver medalist (2011, 2013, 2017), the 2010 World Junior champion, the 2009–10 Junior Grand Prix Final champion, and a four-time Japanese national champion (2012–2015). He has also medaled at three other World Championships, taking bronze in 2012, and silver in 2015 and 2016.

Regarded as one of the greatest figure skaters in history, Hanyu has broken world records sixteen times - the most times among singles skaters since the introduction of the ISU Judging System in 2004. He holds the current world records for the short program and combined total scores in addition to the historical world records for all three segments for the era before the 2018-19 season. He is the first man to have broken the 100-point barrier in the men's short program, the 200-point barrier in the men's free skating, and the 300-point barrier in the combined total score.

Hanyu is the first Asian figure skater competing in men's singles to win the Olympic gold. At nineteen years old, he was the youngest male skater to win the Olympic title since Dick Button in 1948. He also became the first man to win two consecutive Olympic gold medals since Dick Button's back-to-back titles in 1948 and 1952. At the 2016 CS Autumn Classic International, Hanyu became the first skater in history to successfully land a quadruple loop in competition. He is the first men's singles skater from Asia to win multiple World Championships.

In recognition of his achievements, Hanyu has been awarded with numerous accolades, most importantly the People's Honour Award (in 2018) and the Medal of Honour with Purple Ribbon (in 2014 and 2018).

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