Kyle Wachholtz

Kyle Wachholtz (born May 17, 1972 in Norco, California) was a 7th round pick by the Green Bay Packers in the 1996 NFL Draft. Wachholtz won Super Bowl XXXI with the Packers against the New England Patriots. He played college football at USC.[1]

Kyle Wachholtz
No. 7
Born:May 17, 1972 (age 46)
Norco, California
Career information
Position(s)Quarterback, Tight end
CollegeUSC
NFL draft1996 / Round: 7 / Pick: 240
Career history
As player
1996–1998Green Bay Packers
Career stats

College career

Attending USC,[2] Wachholtz recorded 13 career touchdown passes against 4 interceptions, he had a college QBR of 139.2. After being academically ineligible to play at points of his career, Wachholtz split time with Brad Otton as a senior. [3] Wachholtz was the more physical quarterback of the two.[4] However, Wachholtz did not play a single snap in the 1996 Rose Bowl.

Professional career

Wachholtz was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the 1996 NFL Draft (7th round, 240th overall).[5] He was cut by the Packers in 1996 final cuts.[6] On the practice quad later that year, he was converted to a tight end by the Packers. He was promoted to the active roster for Super Bowl XXXI.[7] After a back injury while playing on the practice squad in 1997, he was cut by the Packers in mid-1998.[8] He then tried to play with the Barcelona Dragons of NFL Europe, but failed his physical.[9]

Post-career life

Wachholtz re-enrolled at USC after ending his playing career. Since then, he has had a variety of jobs, most notably in online mortgaging.[9]

References

  1. ^ "Kyle Wachholtz". NFL.com. Retrieved January 6, 2017.
  2. ^ "Sports | Usc Lands 3 Quarterbacks, Including Head Coach's Son | Seattle Times Newspaper". community.seattletimes.nwsource.com. Retrieved January 6, 2017.
  3. ^ Klein, Gary (August 27, 2013). "Timeshare Combos". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved January 6, 2017.
  4. ^ GUSTKEY, EARL (September 27, 1995). "Standing Tall : Wachholtz Doesn't Start, but He's Starting to Impress". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved January 6, 2017.
  5. ^ "Kyle Wachholtz". ESPN.com. Retrieved January 6, 2017.
  6. ^ Press, Associated (August 26, 1996). "PRO FOOTBALL DAILY REPORT : Peete Expected to Play in Eagle Opener". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved January 6, 2017.
  7. ^ Press-Enterprise, JERRY SOIFER | Special to The. "Super Bowl, super hurt". Press Enterprise. Retrieved January 6, 2017.
  8. ^ Press-Enterprise, JERRY SOIFER | Special to The. "Super Bowl, super hurt". Press Enterprise. Retrieved January 6, 2017.
  9. ^ a b "For Wachholtz, time with Packers was joyful, painful". Retrieved January 6, 2017.

External links

1992 USC Trojans football team

The 1992 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California (USC) in the 1992 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their sixth and final year under head coach Larry Smith, the Trojans compiled a 6–5–1 record (5–3 against conference opponents), finished in a tie for third place in the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10), and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 264 to 249.USC's hundredth football season was also Larry Smith's last. Though they placed third in the Pac-10 and secured a bowl berth, they lost their last three games including their rivalry games against Notre Dame and UCLA. Smith was replaced at the end of the season by John Robinson, who returned to USC for a rare second tenure as head coach.

Quarterback Rob Johnson led the team in passing, completing 163 of 285 passes for 2,118 yards with 12 touchdowns and 14 interceptions. Estrus Crayton led the team in rushing with 183 carries for 700 yards and five touchdowns. Curtis Conway led the team in receiving with 49 catches for 764 yards and five touchdowns; Johnnie Morton also had 49 catches for 756 yards and six touchdowns.

1993 USC Trojans football team

The 1993 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California (USC) in the 1993 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their eighth non-consecutive year under head coach John Robinson (Robinson was also USC's coach from 1976 to 1982), the Trojans compiled an 8–5 record (6–2 against conference opponents), won the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) championship, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 348 to 252.Quarterback Rob Johnson led the team in passing, completing 308 of 449 passes for 3,630 yards with 29 touchdowns and six interceptions. Shannon Jones led the team in rushing with 156 carries for 711 yards and seven touchdowns. Johnnie Morton led the team in receiving with 88 catches for 1,520 yards and 14 touchdowns.

1994 USC Trojans football team

The 1994 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California (USC) in the 1994 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their ninth year under head coach John Robinson, the Trojans compiled an 8–3–1 record (6–2 against conference opponents), finished in second place in the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10), and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 356 to 243.Quarterback Rob Johnson led the team in passing, completing 186 of 276 passes for 2,499 yards with 15 touchdowns and six interceptions. Shawn Walters led the team in rushing with 193 carries for 976 yards and 11 touchdowns. Keyshawn Johnson led the team in receiving with 66 catches for 1,362 yards and nine touchdowns.

1995 USC Trojans football team

The 1995 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California (USC) in the 1995 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their tenth year under head coach John Robinson, the Trojans compiled a 9–2–1 record (6–1–1 against conference opponents), shared the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) championship with Washington, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 355 to 212.Quarterback Brad Otton led the team in passing, completing 159 of 256 passes for 1,923 yards with 14 touchdowns and four interceptions. Delon Washington led the team in rushing with 236 carries for 1,109 yards and six touchdowns. Keyshawn Johnson led the team in receiving with 102 catches for 1,434 yards and seven touchdowns.

1996 Green Bay Packers season

The 1996 Green Bay Packers season was their 78th season overall and their 76th in the National Football League, which culminated with the franchise winning its third Super Bowl and league-record 12th NFL Championship. The Packers posted a league-best 13–3 regular season won-loss record, going 8–0 at home and 5–3 on the road. It was the first time since 1962 that the club went undefeated at home. Additionally, the Packers had the NFL's highest-scoring offense (456) and allowed the fewest points on defense (210). Green Bay was the first team to accomplish both feats in the same season since the undefeated 1972 Miami Dolphins. They finished the season with the number one ranked offense, defense, and special teams. They also set a then NFL record for the fewest touchdowns allowed in a 16-game season, with 19. The Packers also allowed the fewest yards in the NFL and set a record for punt return yardage. Brett Favre won his second straight MVP award while also throwing for a career-high and league leading 39 touchdown passes.

In the postseason, the Packers defeated the San Francisco 49ers in the divisional round and the Carolina Panthers in the NFC Championship Game. Green Bay beat the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XXXI to win their third Super Bowl and twelfth NFL Championship.In 2007, the 1996 Packers were ranked as the 16th greatest Super Bowl champions on the NFL Network's documentary series America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions. The 1996 Packers were ranked 6th-greatest Super Bowl team of all-time by a similar panel done by ESPN and released in 2007. As of 2019, the Packers are the only team since the implementation of the salary cap to score the most points and allow the fewest in the regular season.

1996 NFL Draft

The 1996 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 20–21, 1996, at the Paramount Theatre at Madison Square Garden in New York City, New York. No teams chose to claim any players in the supplemental draft that year.

This draft is considered one of the best draft classes ever for the position of wide receiver. Keyshawn Johnson, Terry Glenn, Eddie Kennison, Marvin Harrison, Eric Moulds, Bobby Engram, Terrell Owens, Muhsin Muhammad, Amani Toomer, Jermaine Lewis, and Joe Horn have all achieved success in the pros, with all except Kennison, Engram, and Toomer having reached the Pro Bowl at least once, and a total of 26 Pro Bowl appearances for the group. In addition to the class having had several successful receivers, none of the five wide receivers drafted in the first round have been busts, as all of them spent at least a reasonable amount of time as starters in the NFL. Combined, 1996 wide receivers (through the end of the 2006 season) have totalled 7,646 receptions for 105,866 yards, eclipsing any other class by more than 1,000 receptions and 10,000 yards.It was also one of the best draft years for middle linebackers, with Hall of Famer Ray Lewis and Hall candidate Zach Thomas selected. Lewis won Super Bowl XXXV and was selected MVP of that game. Lewis also won Super Bowl XLVII in the final game of his career, and made 13 career Pro Bowls while Thomas has made 7. Other linebackers who made at least one Pro Bowl from this draft are Tedy Bruschi, Kevin Hardy, Simeon Rice, John Mobley, and Donnie Edwards. Randall Godfrey, Earl Holmes, and Carlos Emmons also had solid careers in the league.

In contrast to its successes at wide receiver and linebacker, the 1996 draft had often been rated as the worst ever for quarterbacks. None of the eight drafted quarterbacks made the Pro Bowl or an All-Pro team. Half of the drafted quarterbacks never threw one pass in the NFL. As of 2018, this remains the last draft without a quarterback selected in the first round. Previously, the 1988 draft had been the last with no quarterback selected in the first round.On draft day, the St. Louis Rams traded running back Jerome Bettis and a third round draft pick to the Pittsburgh Steelers in exchange for a second round pick for that year, as well as a fourth round pick the following year. The trade was made immediately after the Rams drafted Nebraska running back Lawrence Phillips. Bettis went on to have a successful career with the Steelers as well as being one of the team's most popular players, while the Rams wouldn't have another feature back until they traded for Marshall Faulk three years later due to Phillips' off-field problems.

Brad Otton

Brad Otton (born January 25, 1972) is a former American football quarterback who was the USC Trojans starter in 1995 and 1996.

Green Bay Packers draft history

This page is a list of the Green Bay Packers NFL Draft selections. The Packers have participated in every NFL draft since it began in 1936, in which they made Russ Letlow their first-ever selection.

Kyle (given name)

Kyle is a unisex English-language given name, derived from the Scottish surname Kyle, which is itself from a placename (from the Scottish Gaelic caol "narrow, strait").

The feminine given name Kyle has been superseded by the more modern Kyla.

List of USC Trojans in the NFL Draft

This is a list of USC Trojans football players in the NFL Draft.

List of USC Trojans starting quarterbacks

The following individuals have started games at the quarterback position for the USC Trojans football team, updated from 1975 through 2018. Inductees into the College Football Hall of Fame are designated alongside the player's final season. Players who had taken a redshirt season are designated ().

List of University of Southern California people

This is a list of notable alumni, faculty, and students, from the University of Southern California. Those individuals who qualify for multiple categories have been placed under the section for which they are best known.

List of career achievements by Brett Favre

Former quarterback Brett Favre owns or shares a number of NFL records, including pass attempts (10,169), pass interceptions (336) and starts by a player (298). At the time of his retirement, he owned or shared 402 NFL records and still owns or shares 143. He achieved a number of firsts in NFL history, including being the only quarterback to have won three consecutive AP NFL MVP awards and being the first quarterback to win a playoff game after turning 40.

Favre's legacy may be best known for his consecutive starts streak of 297 games (321 including playoffs) which is widely considered one of the most notable streaks in sports, so much so that the Pro Football Hall of Fame has as an exhibit displaying the jersey Favre wore during his record-breaking 117th consecutive start as a quarterback, and a section of their website devoted to what the Hall of Fame calls an "Iron man". Favre considers the consecutive starts feat to be the record he is most proud of.Favre also owns a number of Green Bay Packers and Lambeau Field records.

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