Korea Football Association

The Korea Football Association (Korean대한축구협회; Hanja大韓蹴球協會, Daehan Chukgu Hyeophoe) is the governing body of football in South Korea. Park Seung-bin was the very first President of the KFA, charged with the task of promoting and spreading organised football in the Korea.[1] The budget for 2011 was 103,123,529,503.[2]

Korea Football Association
AFC
Emblem of Korea Football Association
Founded1928
HeadquartersKFA House, 46, Gyeonghuigung-gil, Jongno-gu, Seoul
FIFA affiliation1948
AFC affiliation1954
EAFF affiliation2002
PresidentChung Mong-gyu
Websitehttp://www.kfa.or.kr/
Korea Football Association
Hangul
대한축구협회
Hanja
大韓蹴球協會
Revised RomanizationDaehan Chukgu Hyeophoe
McCune–ReischauerTaehan Ch'ukgu Hyǒphoe

History

Korea has a long football-playing history.[3] In ancient times, there was a Korean ball game called chuk-guk very similar in form to contemporary football. However, Koreans first saw the present version of football in 1882 when British crew members played a game while their vessel was visiting the port of Incheon.[4]

In 1921, the first All Korea Football Tournament was held, and in 1933, The Korea Football Association was organized (following the foundation of Joseon Referees’ Association in 1928), which created a foundation to disseminate and develop the sport.[5]

The Korea Football Association was reinstated in 1948, following the establishment of the Republic of Korea. The KFA became a member of FIFA, the international football governing body that same year. It later joined the AFC (Asian Football Confederation) in 1954.[4]

On 23 January 2013, KFA elected Chung Mong-Gyu as the new chairman.[6]

Name Position Source
South Korea Chung Mong-gyu President [7]
South Korea Shim Tae-hyung Vice President [7]
South Korea Jung Tae-jun 2nd Vice President [7]
South Korea Cho Byung-duk 3rd Vice President [7]
South Korea Choi Young-il 4th Vice President [7]
South Korea Kim Pang-on 5th Vice President [7]
South Korea Chun Han-jin General Secretary [7]
South Korea Kwon Eun-dong Treasurer [7]
South Korea Lee Lim-saeng Technical Director [7]
South Korea Kim Pang-on 2nd Technical Director [7]
Portugal Paulo Bento Team Coach (Men's) [7]
South Korea Yoon Duk-yeo Team Coach (Women's) [7]
South Korea Cho Jun-heon Media/Communications Manager [7]
South Korea Jang Jin-yong Futsal Coordinator [7]
South Korea Won Chang-ho Referee Coordinator [7]

Competitions

List of KFA Presidents
Years Presidents
(No. of tenure)
1928–33 Shin Ki-jun
1933–34 Park Seung-bin (1)
1934–38 Lyuh Woon-hyung (2)
1938–45 Ko Won-hoon (3,4)
1945–48 Ha Kyung-deok (5,6)
1948–49 Shin Ik-hee (7)
1949 Hong Sung-ha (8)
1949–50 Yun Bo-seon (9)
1950–52 Hong Sung-ha (10,11)
1952–54 Chang Taek-sang (12)
1954–55 Lee Jong-lim (13)
1955 Hyun Jung-ju (14)
1955–57 Kim Myung-hak (15, 16)
1957–60 Kim Yoon-ki (17, 18)
1960 Jang Ki-young (19)
1960–61 Jung Moon-ki (20)
1961–62 Jang Ki-young (21)
1962 Kim Yoon-ki (22)
1962–63 Jang Ki-young (23)
1963 Hwang Yeop (24)
1963–64 Kim Yoon-ki (25)
1964 Min Kwan-Sik (26)
1964–70 Choi Chi-hwan (27–30)
1970–73 Jang Deok-jin (31, 32)
1973–75 Ko Tae-jin (33, 34)
1975–78 Kim Yoon-ha (35–37)
1978–79 Park Joon-hong (38)
1979–87 Choi Soon-young (39–43)
1987–88 Lee Jong-hwan (44)
1988–93 Kim Woo-jung (45–46)
1993–09 Chung Mong-joon (47–50)
2009–13 Cho Chung-yun (51)
2013– Chung Mong-gyu (52)

Defunct

Current

National teams

Men

Women

Awards

Most Valuable Player (1969–1984)

In 1985, the award was abolished because it overlapped with K League MVP Award.

Footballer of the Year (Men)

Source: [21]

Footballer of the Year (Women)

Source:[21]

Best Eleven

See also

References

  1. ^ "KFA former Presidents". KFA Website.
  2. ^ "[칼럼] 2011년 KFA 예산 출처와 쓰임새". Korea Football Association. Retrieved 3 August 2012.
  3. ^ "KFA History". KFA Website. Archived from the original on 15 September 2012.
  4. ^ a b "The AFC". www.the-afc.com.
  5. ^ All Joseon Football Tournament. "The history and result of All Joseon Football Tournament". Korea Football Association. Archived from the original on 11 August 2012.
  6. ^ http://tvdaily.mk.co.kr/read.php3?aid=1359349264456871016"Tv Daily"
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o FIFA.com. "Member Association - Korea Republic - FIFA.com". www.fifa.com.
  8. ^ a b 最優秀에 金浩 蹴球 베스트11選定. Dong-a Ilbo (in Korean). Naver.com. 27 December 1969.
  9. ^ a b 축구記者團 올해『베스트11』선정 最優秀선수에 李會澤. Dong-a Ilbo (in Korean). Naver.com. 30 December 1970.
  10. ^ a b 최우수상 金正男 선수 71년 베스트11도 선정. Kyunghyang Shinmun (in Korean). Naver.com. 29 December 1971.
  11. ^ a b 體育記者團「베스트11」뽑아 朴利天 올해 蹴球最優秀선수. Dong-a Ilbo (in Korean). Naver.com. 28 December 1972.
  12. ^ a b 最優秀선수에 車範根군 올蹴球베스트11명 선정. Dong-a Ilbo (in Korean). Naver.com. 22 December 1973.
  13. ^ a b 記者團 최우수선수 卞鎬瑛 蹴球베스트11 선발. Kyunghyang Shinmun (in Korean). Naver.com. 24 December 1974.
  14. ^ a b 최우수 축구선수 金鎬坤 선정 體育記者團. Kyunghyang Shinmun (in Korean). Naver.com. 28 January 1976.
  15. ^ a b 76年 最優秀選手에 蹴球 崔鍾德을 選定 體育記者團. Dong-a Ilbo (in Korean). Naver.com. 8 February 1977.
  16. ^ a b 趙榮增 최우수選手로 新聞•通信 蹴球기자 선정. Kyunghyang Shinmun (in Korean). Naver.com. 26 December 1977.
  17. ^ a b 최우수선수 金在漢 蹴球베스트11 선정. Kyunghyang Shinmun (in Korean). Naver.com. 16 January 1979.
  18. ^ a b 최우수選手 朴成華 체육기자단 蹴球 11. Kyunghyang Shinmun (in Korean). Naver.com. 26 December 1979.
  19. ^ a b 最優秀선수 李榮武 蹴球기자단 選定. Dong-a Ilbo (in Korean). Naver.com. 22 January 1981.
  20. ^ a b 體育기자단 축구 最優秀선수 趙廣來 선정. Dong-a Ilbo (in Korean). Naver.com. 8 January 1982.
  21. ^ a b c d "KFA Archives". KFA. 1 August 2018.
  22. ^ a b 박지성ㆍ지소연, 축구협회 올해의 선수(종합). Yonhap (in Korean). Naver.com. 23 December 2010.
  23. ^ a b 기성용•지소연, 축구협회 '올해의 선수'(종합). Yonhap (in Korean). Naver.com. 20 December 2011.
  24. ^ "Ki Sungyueng and Kim Jungmi were awarded 2016 Player of the Year". Korean Football Association. Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  25. ^ "[KFA AWARD 2017] SON Heungmin and LEE Mina were awarded 2017 Player of the Year". Korean Football Association. Retrieved 3 March 2018.

External links

Association football in South Korea

Association football in South Korea is run by the Korea Football Association. The association administers the national football team as well as the K-League. Football is one of the country's most popular sports along with baseball.

Challengers Cup

Challengers Cup is a South Korean football competition operated by the Korea Football Association. It is played on a knockout (single elimination) basis and only Challengers League's clubs can enter the competition.The competition was inaugurated in the 2011 season. First competition was held from 5 August 2011 to 13 August 2011.

DPR Korea Football Association

The DPR Korea Football Association (PRKFA) (Chosŏn'gŭl: 조선민주주의인민공화국 축구협회; Hanja: 朝鮮民主主義人民共和國蹴球協會) is the governing body of football in North Korea.

The association was founded in 1945 and it joined FIFA in June 1958 and the Asian Football Confederation (AFC) in September 1974.

Football in North Korea

Association football in North Korea is governed by the DPR Korea Football Association (KFA), which was established in 1945. Due to the state's secrecy, attendances and popularity for club matches in the country are hard to gauge. Football is the most popular sport in the country.

Hwaebul Cup

The Hwaebul Cup (홰불, Torch) is an annual association football competition in men's domestic football in North Korea, organised by the DPR Korea Football Association. The competition is held for Youth Day, 28 August, one of North Korea's major holidays.

Korea Cup

Korea Cup was a football competition held annually in the South Korea from 1971 to 1999. The cup, hosted by the Korea Football Association, was contested between South Korea and guest teams.

The cup was created to train the Korea Republic national football team and develop the Asian football in Korea. Originally known as the President's Cup Football Tournament, the name was changed as below:.

The competition ceased after the 1999 tournament.

Man'gyŏngdae Prize

The Man'gyŏngdae Prize is an association football competition held for professional teams in the DPR Korea League in North Korea. The competition is named after the Mangyongdae settlement, where Kim Hyong-jik was from. It is held and overseen by the DPR Korea Football Association and was founded in 2000.

North Korea national under-17 football team

The North Korea national under-17 football team, represents North Korea in association football at an under-17 age level and is controlled by the DPR Korea Football Association, the governing body for football in North Korea.

North Korea national under-20 football team

The North Korea national under-20 football team is the youth association football team representing North Korea in youth competitions and it is controlled by DPR Korea Football Association. The team participated in 2014 AFC U-19 Championship and qualified for the 2015 FIFA U-20 World Cup after reaching the Finals stage.

North Korea national under-23 football team

The North Korea national Under-23 football team represents North Korea at the Asian Games and other under-23 competitions.

They are controlled by the DPR Korea Football Association.

North Korea women's national under-20 football team

The North Korea women's national under-20 football team represents the Democratic People's Republic of Korea in international association football competitions in the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup and the AFC U-19 Women's Championship, as well as any other under-20 women's international football tournaments. It is governed by the DPR Korea Football Association.

They have won the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup twice, in 2006 and 2016. Upon the former triumph, they became the first Asian team to win a FIFA women's tournament and the first Asian football team to win any FIFA tournaments since Saudi Arabia's victory in the 1989 FIFA U-16 World Championship.

Osandŏk Prize

The Osandok Prize is an association football competition held for professional teams in the DPR Korea League in North Korea. It is held and overseen by the DPR Korea Football Association and was founded in 2015.

Paektusan Prize

The Paektusan Prize is an annual association football competition in men's domestic football in North Korea, organised by the DPR Korea Football Association.

South Korea national beach soccer team

The Korea Republic national beach soccer team represents South Korea in international beach soccer competitions and is controlled by the Korea Football Association, the governing body for beach soccer in South Korea.

South Korea national football team

The Korea Republic national football team (Korean: 대한민국 축구 국가대표팀) represents South Korea in international association football and is organised by the Korea Football Association.

Since the 1960s, South Korea has emerged as a major football power in Asia and is historically the most successful Asian football team, having participated in nine consecutive and ten overall FIFA World Cup tournaments, the most for any Asian country. Despite initially going through five World Cup tournaments without winning a match, South Korea became the first and currently only Asian team to reach the semi-final stages when they co-hosted the 2002 tournament with Japan. South Korea won the first two AFC Asian Cup tournaments (1956 and 1960), though they have been unable to win since, finishing as the runners-up in 1972, 1980, 1988, and 2015, and third in 1964, 2000, 2007, and 2011. They also took the gold medal at the 1970, 1978, and 1986 Asian Games. They have qualified for every FIFA World Cup since 1986.The team is commonly nicknamed "The Reds" by both fans and the media due to the color of their primary kit. The national team's supporting group is officially referred to as the Red Devils.

South Korea national futsal team

The South Korea national futsal team is controlled by the Korea Football Association, the governing body for futsal in South Korea and represents the country in international futsal competitions.

Unlike the 11-a-side game, due to lack of investments, South Korean futsal does not achieve much success. After 2014, KFA had decided to improve futsal in South Korea.

South Korea national under-17 football team

The Korea Republic national under-17 football team represents South Korea in international under 17 football competitions and is controlled by the Korea Football Association.

South Korea women's national futsal team

The South Korea women's national futsal team is controlled by the Korea Football Association, the governing body for futsal in South Korea and represents the country in international futsal competitions.

WK League

The WK League (Hangul: WK리그) is a semi-professional women's football league, run by the Korea Football Association (KFA) and the Korea Women's Football Federation (KWFF), which represents the sport's highest level in South Korea. The regular season runs from April to October, with each team playing 28 games.

Since the inception of the WK League in 2009, three clubs have won the title: Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels (6), Goyang Daekyo (3), and Suwon UDC (1).

Korea Football Association Footballer of the Year
Most Valuable Player
Footballer of the Year
Korea Football Association Women's Footballer of the Year
Year Goalkeeper Defenders Midfielders Forwards
1969[8] Lee Se-Yeon (Yangzee) Seo Yoon-Chan (Yangzee)
Kim Jung-Nam (Yangzee)
Lim Kook-Chan (Yangzee)
Choi Tae-Yeol (Korea Exchange Bank)
Kim Ho (Commercial Bank of Korea)
Kim Ki-Bok (Yangzee)
Lee Hoe-Taik (Yangzee)
Jung Kang-Ji (Yangzee)
Jung Byung-Tak (Yangzee)
Lee Yi-Woo (Cheil Industries)
1970[9] Lee Se-Yeon (Seoul Bank) Kim Jung-Nam (Korea Exchange Bank)
Kim Ho (Commercial Bank of Korea)
Choi Jae-Mo (ROK Army)
Park Byung-joo (Seoul Bank)
Seo Yoon-Chan (Korea Trust Bank)
Kim Ki-Bok (Chung-Ang Univ.)
Lee Hoe-Taik (Hanyang Univ.)
Jung Kang-Ji (Korea Trust Bank)
Park Lee-Chun (ROK Army)
Park Su-Deok (Kyunghee Univ.)
1971[10] Lee Se-Yeon (Seoul Bank) Kim Ho (Commercial Bank of Korea)
Kim Jung-Nam (Korea Exchange Bank)
Choi Kil-Su (Industrial Bank of Korea)
Choi Jae-Mo (ROK Army)
Lee Cha-Man (Korea Univ.)
Kim Chang-Il (Korea Univ.)
Park Lee-Chun (Chung-Ang Univ.)
Lee Hoe-Taik (Hanyang Univ.)
Park Su-Deok (ROK Marines)
Jung Kyu-Pung (ROK Army)
1972[11] Lee Se-Yeon (Seoul Bank) Kim Ho (Commercial Bank of Korea)
Park Young-Tae (ROK Marines)
Kim Ho-Gon (Yonsei Univ.)
Hwang Jae-Man (Korea Univ.)
Ko Jae-Wook (Korea Univ.)
Lee Cha-Man (Korea Univ.)
Park Lee-Chun (Kookmin Bank)
Kim Jae-Han (Housing & Commercial Bank)
Cha Bum-Kun (Korea Univ.)
Lee Hoe-Taik (Hanyang Univ.)
1973[12] Byun Ho-Young (Seoul Bank) Yoo Ki-Heung (Commercial Bank of Korea)
Park Young-Tae (ROK Marines)
Kang Ki-Wook (ROK Army)
Kim Ho-Gon (Yonsei Univ.)
Ko Jae-Wook (Korea Univ.)
Park Byung-chul (Hanyang Univ.)
Park Lee-Chun (Kookmin Bank)
Cha Bum-Kun (Korea Univ.)
Jung Kyu-Pung (Kookmin Bank)
Kim Jae-Han (Housing & Commercial Bank)
1974[13] Byun Ho-Young (Seoul Bank) Kang Ki-Wook (ROK Army)
Kim Ho-Gon (Yonsei Univ.)
Choi Jae-Mo (POSCO)
Hwang Jae-Man (Korea Univ.)
Ko Jae-Wook (ROK Army)
Park Byung-chul (Hanyang Univ.)
Cha Bum-Kun (Korea Univ.)
Lee Hoe-Taik (POSCO)
Park Lee-Chun (Kookmin Bank)
Huh Jung-Moo (Yonsei Univ.)
1975[14] Kwon Yi-Woon (Industrial Bank of Korea) Kim Ho-Gon (ROK Army)
Hwang Jae-Man (Seoul Trust Bank)
Cho Young-Jeung (Chung-Ang Univ.)
Choi Jong-Deok (Korea Univ.)
Park Byung-chul (Kookmin Bank)
Park Sang-In (ROK Army)
Cha Bum-Kun (Korea Univ.)
Kim Jin-Kook (Industrial Bank of Korea)
Lee Young-Moo (Kyunghee Univ.)
Cho Dong-Hyun (Industrial Bank of Korea)
1976[15] Kim Hee-Cheon (Hanyang Univ.) Kim Ho-Gon (Seoul Trust Bank)
Choi Jong-Deok (Korea Univ.)
Hwang Jae-Man (ROK Air Force)
Park Seong-Hwa (Korea Univ.)
Kim Kang-Nam (Korea Univ.)
Park Sang-In (Commercial Bank of Korea)
Cha Bum-Kun (ROK Air Force)
Kim Jin-Kook (Industrial Bank of Korea)
Lee Young-Moo (Kyunghee Univ.)
Park Yong-Joo (Hanyang Univ.)
1977[16] Kim Hee-Cheon (Hanyang Univ.) Kim Ho-Gon (Seoul Trust Bank)
Choi Jong-Deok (Korea Univ.)
Cho Young-Jeung (ROK Navy)
Park Seong-Hwa (Korea Univ.)
Cho Kwang-Rae (Yonsei Univ.)
Park Sang-In (Commercial Bank of Korea)
Cha Bum-Kun (ROK Air Force)
Kim Jae-Han (Housing & Commercial Bank)
Lee Young-Moo (POSCO)
Huh Jung-Moo (Yonsei Univ.)
1978[17] Kim Hwang-Ho (ROK Navy) Kim Ho-Gon (Seoul Trust Bank)
Cho Young-Jeung (First Bank)
Park Seong-Hwa (POSCO)
Hwang Jae-Man (Seongmu)
Cho Kwang-Rae (POSCO)
Park Sang-In (Commercial Bank of Korea)
Lee Young-Moo (ROKA Support Group)
Kim Jae-Han (Housing & Commercial Bank)
Cha Bum-Kun (Seongmu)
Huh Jung-Moo (ROK Navy)
1979[18] Kim Hwang-Ho (ROK Navy) Kim Ho-Gon (Seoul Trust Bank)
Cho Young-Jeung (First Bank)
Park Byung-chul (unattached)
Lee Jang-Soo (Yonsei Univ.)
Park Sang-In (Commercial Bank of Korea)
Cho Kwang-Rae (Chung-Eui)
Park Seong-Hwa (Chung-Eui)
Lee Young-Moo (Chung-Eui)
Shin Hyun-Ho (Chung-Eui)
Huh Jung-Moo (ROK Navy)
1980[19] Cho Byung-Deuk (Hallelujah) Cho Young-Jeung (First Bank)
Hong Seong-Ho (Hallelujah)
Choi Jong-Deok (Chung-Eui)
Chang Woe-Ryong (Yonsei Univ.)
Cho Kwang-Rae (Daewoo)
Lee Young-Moo (Hallelujah)
Lee Kang-Jo (Korea Univ.)
Chung Hae-Won (Yonsei Univ.)
Choi Soon-Ho (POSCO)
Park Jong-Won (Kaiserslautern)
1981[20] Jung Seong-Gyo (Yonsei Univ.) Park Seong-Hwa (Hallelujah)
Kwon Oh-Son (Seoul City)
Chang Woe-Ryong (Yonsei Univ.)
Park Kyung-Hoon (Hanyang Univ.)
Cho Kwang-Rae (Daewoo)
Lee Kang-Jo (Korea Univ.)
Lee Tae-Ho (Korea Univ.)
Hwang Seok-Keun (Korea Univ.)
Chung Hae-Won (Yonsei Univ.)
Byun Byung-Joo (Yonsei Univ.)
General
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