King of the Hill (The Simpsons)

"King of the Hill" is the twenty-third episode in the ninth season of the American animated television series The Simpsons. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on May 3, 1998.[2] It was written by John Swartzwelder and directed by Steven Dean Moore, and guest stars Brendan Fraser and Steven Weber.[2] The episode sees Homer trying to climb a large mountain to impress Bart after he humiliates him at a church picnic with his lack of fitness.

"King of the Hill"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no.Season 9
Episode 23
Directed bySteven Dean Moore
Written byJohn Swartzwelder
Production code5F16
Original air dateMay 3, 1998
Guest appearance(s)

Brendan Fraser as Brad
Steven Weber as Neil

Episode features
Couch gagThe Simpsons sit on the couch and the camera zooms out to reveal that they are inside a snow globe. Two hands then shake the globe.[1]
CommentaryMike Scully
Richard Appel
Steven Dean Moore

Plot

After his obesity embarrasses Bart at a church picnic, Homer attempts to lose weight. He soon discovers Power Sauce, an energy bar which he starts to eat regularly.

At a gym, Homer meets Rainier Wolfcastle who becomes his fitness coach. In two months, Homer is healthier and reveals what he has been doing to his family. At the gym, two Power Sauce representatives ask Rainier to climb to the top of Springfield's tallest mountain, "The Murderhorn", as a publicity stunt. When he refuses, Bart insists Homer do it.

Despite his father telling him about how he was betrayed by a friend, C. W. McAllister, during their climb on the Murderhorn, Homer accepts and is aided by two Sherpas, but fires them after waking up one night to find them secretly dragging him up.

The mountain proves too treacherous and high for Homer, who takes shelter in a cave. In it, he finds McAllister's frozen body and evidence proving it was Abraham who betrayed him. Too tired and ashamed to continue, Homer sticks his flag pole on the ledge. The ensuing crack collapses the rest of the mountain, making where he is on now the peak. Proud, he uses McAllister's body to sled down, where he is greeted by the crowd.[2][3]

Production

The episode was pitched and written by John Swartzwelder. The writing staff had to find a new angle for Homer's weight problems, as the idea had been used several times before. This was emphasized in this episode when Marge does not seem to care that Homer is going to try to lose weight again.[4]

In the scenes where the Sherpas were speaking, the show staff went to great lengths to find translations. Originally, the producers of the film adaption of the book Into Thin Air were contacted to help. The film producers were shocked at the trouble the Simpsons staff were going to, and replied that they had simply made up translations in the film. The staff then had to consult various experts by telephone.[4]

The idea of the upper part of the mountain collapsing so Homer would be at the peak came from Mike Scully's brother Brian, after the staff "desperately needed a way out".[4]

Cultural references

The mountain Homer must climb, the Murderhorn, is a reference to the mountain Matterhorn, which is located in the Swiss Alps.[1] The name of the episode is a reference to the Fox series King of The Hill.

Reception

In its original broadcast, "King of the Hill" finished 23rd in ratings for the week of April 27–May 4, 1998, with a Nielsen rating of 9.4, equivalent to approximately 9.2 million viewing households. It was the fourth highest-rated show on the Fox network that week, following The X-Files, King of the Hill, and Ally McBeal.[5]

The authors of the book I Can't Believe It's a Bigger and Better Updated Unofficial Simpsons Guide, Warren Martyn and Adrian Wood, thought well of the episode, stating: "A quite charming little adventure in which, in an effort to impress Bart, Homer undertakes a dangerous adventure and comes through successfully. It's nice because just for once, to all intents and purposes, Homer actually succeeds in something."[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c Martyn, Warren; Wood, Adrian (2000). "This Little Wiggy". BBC.co.uk. Retrieved 2007-11-01.
  2. ^ a b c Gimple, Scott (1999). The Simpsons Forever!: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family ...Continued. Harper Collins Publishers. p. 40. ISBN 0-06-098763-4.
  3. ^ "King of the Hill" The Simpsons.com. Retrieved on November 1, 2007
  4. ^ a b c Scully, Mike (2006). The Simpsons season 9 DVD commentary for the episode "King of the Hill" (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  5. ^ Associated Press (May 7, 1998). "'Merlin' magic works again for NBC". Sun-Sentinel. p. 4E.

External links

1998 Kids' Choice Awards

The 11th Annual Nickelodeon Kids' Choice Awards was held on April 4, 1998, at Pauley Pavilion at UCLA in Los Angeles, California. Rap star Sean Puffy Combs became the latest recipient of Nickelodeon's highest honor, a sliming.

1999–2000 United States network television schedule

The 1999–2000 United States network television schedule is for the United States broadcast television schedule on all six commercial television networks for the fall season beginning in September 1999. All times are Eastern and Pacific, with certain exceptions, such as Monday Night Football.

New series highlighted in bold.

Each of the 30 highest-rated shows is listed with its rank and rating as determined by Nielsen Media Research.

Yellow indicates the programs in the top 10 for the season.

Cyan indicates the programs in the top 20 for the season.

Magenta indicates the programs in the top 30 for the season.PBS is not included; member stations have local flexibility over most of their schedules and broadcast times for network shows may vary.

2000–01 Canadian network television schedule

The 2000-01 Canadian network television schedule indicates the fall prime time schedules for Canada's major English broadcast networks. For schedule changes after the fall launch, please consult each network's individual article.

2000–01 United States network television schedule

The 2000–01 network television schedule for the six major English-language commercial broadcast networks in the United States covers prime time hours from September 2000 to August 2001. The schedule is followed by a list per network of returning series, new series, and series canceled after the 1999-2000 season.

New fall series are highlighted in bold.

Note: The Sydney Olympics hindered the ability to start airing shows in a timely manner. Most television series began their seasons during the month of October.

Each of the 30 highest-rated shows is listed with its rank and rating as determined by Nielsen Media Research.

Yellow indicates the programs in the top 10 for the season.

Cyan indicates the programs in the top 20 for the season.

Magenta indicates the programs in the top 30 for the season.PBS is not included; member stations have local flexibility over most of their schedules and broadcast times for network shows may vary.

2001–02 United States network television schedule

The 2001–2002 United States network television schedule is for United States broadcast television on all six commercial television networks for the fall season beginning in September 2001. All times are Eastern and Pacific, with certain exceptions, such as Monday Night Football.

New fall series are highlighted in bold.

NOTE: The September 11 attacks hindered the ability to start airing shows in a timely manner. Although many series began their seasons in September and October as regularly scheduled, the television season officially did not begin until the month of November. From February 8 to 24, 2002, all of NBC's primetime programming was preempted in favor of coverage of the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City.

Each of the 30 highest-rated shows is listed with its rank and rating as determined by Nielsen Media Research.

Yellow indicates the programs in the top 10 for the season.

Cyan indicates the programs in the top 20 for the season.

Magenta indicates the programs in the top 30 for the season.PBS is not included; member stations have local flexibility over most of their schedules and broadcast times for network shows may vary.

2003–04 United States network television schedule

The following is the 2003–04 network television schedule for the six major English language commercial broadcast networks in the United States. The schedule covers primetime hours from September 2003 through May 2004. The schedule is followed by a list per network of returning series, new series, and series cancelled after the 2002–03 season. All times are Eastern and Pacific, with certain exceptions, such as Monday Night Football.

New series are highlighted in bold.

Each of the 30 highest-rated shows is listed with its rank and rating as determined by Nielsen Media Research.The 2003-2004 season marked the final time that the major networks scheduled substantial original scripted drama series on Saturdays. After years of declining ratings on that particular evening, beginning with the 2004-2005 season the networks ceased scheduling original dramas on Saturdays, choosing instead to fill the schedule with non-fiction programming and reruns.

Yellow indicates the programs in the top 10 for the season.

Cyan indicates the programs in the top 20 for the season.

Magenta indicates the programs in the top 30 for the season.PBS is not included; member stations have local flexibility over most of their schedules and broadcast times for network shows may vary.

From August 13 to 29, 2004, all of NBC's primetime programming was preempted in favor of coverage of the 2004 Summer Olympics.

2005–06 Canadian network television schedule

The 2005–06 Canadian network television schedule indicates the fall prime time schedules for Canada's major English broadcast networks. For schedule changes after the fall launch, please consult each network's individual article.

The CBC fall schedule was delayed because of the "CBC" lockout which ended in October.

2006 Teen Choice Awards

The 2006 Teen Choice Awards ceremony was held on August 20, 2006, at the Gibson Amphitheatre, Universal City, California. The event was hosted by Dane Cook and Jessica Simpson with Nelly Furtado & Timbaland, Rihanna, and Kevin Federline as performers. Fall Out Boy was one of the ceremony's biggest winners with three awards.

2006–07 Canadian network television schedule

The 2006–07 Canadian network television schedule indicates the fall prime time schedules for Canada's major English broadcast networks. For schedule changes after the fall launch, please consult each network's individual article.

2006–07 United States network television schedule

The following is the 2006–07 network television schedule for the six major English language commercial broadcast networks in the United States. The schedule covers prime time hours from September 2006 through May 2007. The schedule is followed by a list per network of returning series, new series, and series cancelled after the 2005–06 season.

The schedules include the four most popular networks (CBS, ABC, NBC, and Fox) and two new networks introduced as part of the broadcast TV realignment: The CW and MyNetworkTV.

Each of the 30 highest-rated shows is listed with its rank and rating as determined by Nielsen Media Research.PBS is not included; member stations have local flexibility over most of their schedules and broadcast times for network shows may vary.

Yellow indicates the top ten most watched programs of the season.

Cyan indicates the top 20 most watched programs of the season.

Magenta indicates the top 30 most watched programs of the season.

2009–10 Canadian network television schedule

The 2009–10 Canadian network television schedule indicates the fall prime time schedules for Canada's major English and French broadcast networks. For schedule changes after the fall launch, please consult each network's individual article.

Note: TQS rebrands as the V Network

American Dad!

American Dad! is an American animated sitcom created by Seth MacFarlane, Mike Barker and Matt Weitzman for the Fox Broadcasting Company. It moved to TBS in 2014. American Dad! is the first television series to have its inception on Animation Domination. The series premiered on February 6, 2005, following Super Bowl XXXIX, three months before the rest of the first season aired as part of the Animation Domination block, commencing on May 1, 2005.Creative direction of American Dad! has largely been guided by Barker (prior to his exit from the show in season 10) and Weitzman as opposed to MacFarlane, resulting in a series that is different from its counterparts. Unlike MacFarlane's other shows, Family Guy and, to a lesser extent, The Cleveland Show, American Dad! does not lean as heavily on the use of cutaway gags, and is less concerned with conventional "setup-punchline" jokes, instead deriving its humor mostly from the quirky characters, the relationships between family members, and the relatively relatable plots. While the core issues and resolutions are relatable in most episodes, the show nonetheless weaves in fantastical elements, pitching the tone of the show somewhere between observational comedy and farce. The plots are often absurd, but they are grounded by family stories and real-world issues.American Dad! has been nominated for numerous awards, most prominently four Primetime Emmy Awards and two Annie Awards. In June 2013, it was awarded as top television series by the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. Since its debut, American Dad! has broadcast 276 episodes (as of August 26, 2019). The total number of seasons and organization of episodes within these seasons are in dispute because of a discrepancy in how official sources report this information. One model suggests the first season of American Dad! comprises the first 7 episodes, while another model suggests the first season comprises 23 episodes.Beginning on October 20, 2014, TBS picked up the series for the 12th season following the final 3 episodes airing on Fox as the 11th season. American Dad! is a joint production by Underdog Productions, Fuzzy Door Productions, and 20th Century Fox Television and syndicated by 20th Television. Despite TBS buying the rights to air new episodes of the series in 2014, 20th Century Fox Television still owns the copyrights and still produces the show and 20th Television still syndicates it to TBS and Cartoon Network's night block Adult Swim, both owned by WarnerMedia, which is a subsidiary of AT&T.

American Dad!'s sixteenth season (its fifth on TBS) premiered on April 15, 2019. On January 11, 2018, TBS renewed the series for a 17th season.

It Takes a Village Idiot, and I Married One

"It Takes a Village Idiot, and I Married One" is the 17th episode of the fifth season of the animated comedy series Family Guy. It originally aired on Fox in the United States on May 13, 2007. The episode features Lois after she runs for Mayor of Quahog against incumbent Mayor Adam West, once she notices how polluted the local lake has become. Lois is elected as mayor and successfully cleans the lake, but quickly succumbs when the toxic-dump owner pressures her to let him resume dumping toxins into the lake.

The episode was written by Alex Borstein and directed by Zac Moncrief. It received mixed reviews from critics for its storyline and many cultural references. According to Nielsen ratings, it was viewed in 7.21 million homes in its original airing. The episode featured guest performances by Jeff Bergman, Gary Cole, Jackson Douglas, Keith Ferguson, Carrie Fisher, Masam Holden, Don Most, Gary Newman, Keith Olbermann, and Fred Tatasciore, along with several of the series' recurring guest-voice actors.

List of programmes broadcast by Fox (Italy)

This is a list of television programs broadcast by Fox in Italy.

Paley Center for Media

The Paley Center for Media, formerly the Museum of Television & Radio (MT&R) and the Museum of Broadcasting, founded in 1975 by William S. Paley, is an American cultural institution in New York and Los Angeles dedicated to the discussion of the cultural, creative, and social significance of television, radio, and emerging platforms for the professional community and media-interested public.

It was renamed The Paley Center for Media on June 5, 2007, to encompass emerging broadcasting technologies such as the Internet, mobile video, and podcasting, as well as to expand its role as a neutral setting where media professionals can engage in discussion and debate about the evolving media landscape.

Ron Popeil

Ronald M. Popeil (; born May 3, 1935) is an American inventor and marketing personality, best known for his direct response marketing company Ronco. He is well known for his appearances in infomercials for the Showtime Rotisserie and the coined phrase "Set it, and forget it!" as well as popularizing the phrase, "But wait, there's more!" on television as early as the mid-1950s.

Teen Choice Award for Choice Animated Series

The following is a list of Teen Choice Award winners and nominees for Choice Animated Series. Family Guy receives the most wins with 6.

Television producer

A television producer is a person who oversees one or more aspects of video production on a television program. Some producers take more of an executive role, in that they conceive new programs and pitch them to the television networks, but upon acceptance they focus on business matters, such as budgets and contracts. Other producers are more involved with the day-to-day workings, participating in activities such as screenwriting, set design, casting and directing.

There are a variety of different producers on a television show. A traditional producer is one who manages a show's budget and maintains a schedule, but this is no longer the case in modern television.

Season 9
Themed episodes
See also

Languages

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