Kiner's Korner

Kiner's Korner was a post game interview show following New York Mets home games hosted by Mets broadcaster Ralph Kiner. It debuted on April 30, 1963, with guests Buddy Hackett and Phil Foster.[1] The show usually consisted of an interview with the star of the game from the winning team, along with game highlights and scores of other games from that day. Sometimes two players were featured.[2] As years went by and Kiner's workload decreased, the show was on less frequently, usually following home games on free television. Kiner developed a reputation for occasionally incorrectly stating the names of players being interviewed or in highlights.[3]

The show's theme music was Flag of Victory Polka, written by Alvino Rey under the name Ira Ironstrings.[4][5] The show's name came from theclose-in left field seats in Forbes Field where Kiner deposited many home runs during his Hall of Fame career as a Pirate slugger. They were originally known as "Greenberg's Gardens" for Kiner's precursor and mentor Hank Greenberg, but earned their new name after Greenberg's retirement and Kiner's meteoric rise to stardom. It measured 340 feet to left field. The temporary fence was removed in the 1950's to restore it to the original 365 feet.

In 2010, SNY.TV, (website of SportsNet New York, the Mets' cable network), announced the replaying of nine classic episodes of Kiner's Korner on the web, in a series entitled "Kiner's Korner Revisited". While the network was in possession of several episodes, many had been lost or taped over.[6]

References

  1. ^ Lucas, Ed (April 27, 2012) After 50 years, Ralph Kiner is still a Mets broadcasting icon, NJ.com. Retrieved April 11, 2015.
  2. ^ Myers, Gary (February 6, 2014). "Working for Ralph Kiner on Kiner's Korner was the coolest job I ever had". New York Daily News. Retrieved April 11, 2015.
  3. ^ Mushnick, Phil (February 6, 2014). "Unique calls were Ralph Kiner's Korner-stone". New York Post. Retrieved April 11, 2015.
  4. ^ Rosenman, Mark; Karpin, Howie (2016). Down on the Korner. New York, N.Y.: Carrel Books. ISBN 978-1-63144-042-7. Retrieved 19 August 2017.
  5. ^ Bundy, June (November 23, 1959). "Vox Jocks". Billboard. p. 22. Retrieved 19 August 2017.
  6. ^ Sandomir, Richard (August 21, 2010). "'Kiner's Korner' Returns, Dusted Off and in Digital". New York Times. Retrieved August 19, 2017.

External links

1964 Major League Baseball season

The 1964 Major League Baseball season was played from April 13 to October 15, 1964. This season is often remembered for the end of the New York Yankees' third dynasty, as they won their 29th American League Championship in 44 seasons. However, the Yankees lost the World Series to the St. Louis Cardinals in seven games. As of 2018, the Cardinals are the only National League team to have an edge over the Yankees in series played (3–2), amongst the non-expansion teams.

1964 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1964 throughout the world.

Angels in the Outfield (1951 film)

Angels in the Outfield is a 1951 American comedy film produced and directed by Clarence Brown and starring Paul Douglas and Janet Leigh. Based on a story by Richard Conlin, the film is about a young woman reporter who blames the Pittsburgh Pirates' losing streak on their abusive manager, who begins hearing the voice of an angel promising to help the team if he changes his ways. The film was released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer on October 19, 1951.

Bang the Drum Slowly (film)

Bang the Drum Slowly is a 1973 American sports drama film directed by John D. Hancock, about a baseball player of limited intellect who has a terminal illness, and his brainier, more skilled teammate. It is a film adaptation of the 1956 baseball novel of the same name by American author Mark Harris. It was previously dramatized in 1956 on the U.S. Steel Hour with Paul Newman, Albert Salmi and George Peppard.

This version stars Michael Moriarty and a then little known Robert De Niro as baseball teammates. De Niro's performance in this film and in Mean Streets, released two months later, brought him widespread acclaim.

Forbes Field

Forbes Field was a baseball park in the Oakland neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, from 1909 to June 28, 1970. It was the third home of the Pittsburgh Pirates Major League Baseball (MLB) team, and the first home of the Pittsburgh Steelers, the city's National Football League (NFL) franchise. The stadium also served as the home football field for the University of Pittsburgh "Pitt" Panthers from 1909 to 1924. The stadium was named after British general John Forbes, who fought in the French and Indian War, and named the city in 1758.

The US$1 million ($27.9 million today) project was initiated by Pittsburgh Pirates' owner Barney Dreyfuss, with the goal of replacing his franchise's then-current home, Exposition Park. The stadium was made of concrete and steel (one of the first of its kind) in order to increase its lifespan. The Pirates opened Forbes Field on June 30, 1909, against the Chicago Cubs, and played the final game against the Cubs on June 28, 1970. The field itself featured a large playing surface, with the batting cage placed in the deepest part of center field during games. Seating was altered multiple times throughout the stadium's life; at times fans were permitted to sit on the grass in the outfield during overflow crowds. The Pirates won three World Series while at Forbes Field and the other original tenant, the Pittsburgh Panthers football team had five undefeated seasons before moving in 1924.

Some remnants of the ballpark still stand, surrounded by the campus of the University of Pittsburgh. Fans gather on the site annually on the anniversary of Bill Mazeroski's World Series winning home run, in what author Jim O'Brien writes is "one of the most unique expressions of a love of the game to be found in a major league city".

Fritz Ostermueller

Frederick Raymond "Fritz" Ostermueller (September 15, 1907 – December 17, 1957) was a pitcher in major league baseball from 1934 to 1948 for the Boston Red Sox, St. Louis Browns, Brooklyn Dodgers, and Pittsburgh Pirates. While with Pittsburgh, he coined the famous quote frequently misattributed to teammate Ralph Kiner: "Home run hitters drive Cadillacs; singles hitters drive Fords."

Garry Maddox

Garry Lee Maddox (born September 1, 1949), is an American former professional baseball center fielder, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the San Francisco Giants and Philadelphia Phillies, from 1972 to 1986. Throughout his baseball career, Maddox was highly regarded for his outstanding defense.

History of the Pittsburgh Pirates

The following is a history of the Pittsburgh Pirates of Major League Baseball.

Home run

In baseball, a home run (abbreviated HR) is scored when the ball is hit in such a way that the batter is able to circle the bases and reach home

safely in one play without any errors being committed by the defensive team in the process. In modern baseball, the feat is typically achieved by hitting the ball over the outfield fence between the foul poles (or making contact with either foul pole) without first touching the ground, resulting in an automatic home run. There is also the "inside-the-park" home run where the batter reaches home safely while the baseball is in play on the field. A home run with a high exit velocity and good launch angle is sometimes called a "no-doubter," because it leaves no doubt that it is going to leave the park when it leaves the bat.

When a home run is scored, the batter is also credited with a hit and a run scored, and an RBI for each runner that scores, including himself. Likewise, the pitcher is recorded as having given up a hit, and a run for each runner that scores including the batter.

Home runs are among the most popular aspects of baseball and, as a result, prolific home run hitters are usually the most popular among fans and consequently the highest paid by teams—hence the old saying, "Home run hitters drive Cadillacs, and singles hitters drive Fords (coined, circa 1948, by veteran pitcher Fritz Ostermueller, by way of mentoring his young teammate, Ralph Kiner).

List of New York Mets broadcasters

Current broadcasters

Television: SportsNet New York (SNY) or WPIX channel 11

Gary Cohen, Ron Darling, Keith Hernandez, Steve Gelbs

Radio: WCBS 880 AM (English)

Howie Rose, Wayne Randazzo, Ed Coleman, Brad Heller

Radio: WEPN 1050 AM (Spanish)

Juan Alicea, Max Perez Jimenez, Nestor Rosario

Ralph Kiner

Ralph McPherran Kiner (October 27, 1922 – February 6, 2014) was an American Major League Baseball player and broadcaster. An outfielder, Kiner played for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Chicago Cubs, and Cleveland Indians from 1946 through 1955. Following his retirement, Kiner served from 1956 through 1960 as general manager of the Pacific Coast League San Diego Padres. He also served as an announcer for the New York Mets from the team's inception until his death. Though injuries forced his retirement from active play after 10 seasons, Kiner's tremendous slugging outpaced all of his National League contemporaries between the years 1946 and 1952. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1975.

At the time of his death, baseball writer Marty Noble named Kiner "one of baseball's genuine and most charming gentlemen".

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