Kiel Week

The Kiel Week (German: Kieler Woche) or Kiel Regatta is an annual sailing event in Kiel, the capital of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. It is the largest sailing event in the world, and also one of the largest Volksfeste in Germany, attracting millions of people every year from all over Germany and neighbouring countries.[1]

Kiel Week
First held1882
Organizer Kieler Yacht-Club
 Norddeutscher Regatta Verein
 Hamburger Segel-Club
 Verein Seglerhaus am Wannsee
Class(es)2.4mR, 29er, 420, 470, 49er, 49er FX, 505, Albin Express, Bavaria B/One, Contender, Europe, Finn, Flying Dutchman, Formula 18, Hobie 16, J/24, J/70, J/80, Laser 4.7, Laser Radial, Laser, Melges 24, Musto Performance Skiff, Nacra 17, Nordic Folkboat, OK, ORC, Platu 25, SB20, Sonar_(keelboat), X-99
Official websitekieler-woche.de
Windjammerparade
Tall Ships Parade at Kiel Week, the world's biggest regatta and sailing event (2009)
Regattafeld vor Laboe
Regatta of cruising yachts in front of Laboe, 2003
Ubena von Bremen Kiel2007
Amphitrite, Ubena von Bremen, and Roald Amundsen in 2007, forming part of the annual tall ship fleet at Kiel Week
Kieler Woche
Tall ships attracting visitors in port during Kiel Week 2006
Kieler Woche 2005 Spiellinie
Fairs and events as part of festival at shore, 2005

Events

Kiel Week is held annually in the last week in June, and opens officially on the preceding Saturday with the official Glasen, followed by the Holstenbummel. The "Soundcheck" is on the Friday before the official opening; it is a music festival across all the stages within the city. Kiel Week ends with a large fireworks display at 11 p.m. on Sunday, fired from pontoons or the quays at the Howaldtswerke, visible all across the Bay of Kiel.

Most ship races begin at the Olympic Harbor of Schilksee, also the center of most sporting activities during Kiel Week. As Schilksee is located outside of the inner city and most sailing competitions take place yet further out, only some races - mainly of smaller boat types - can be viewed from shore, namely from along the Kiellinie at the west coast of the Bay of Kiel.

Kiel Week usually gathers around 5,000 sailors, 2,000 ships, and about three million visitors each year. The event is organized in joint effort by the Yacht Club of Kiel, the Norddeutscher Regattaverein, the Hamburger Sailing Club, and the Verein Seglerhaus am Wannsee.

While Kiel Week started out as a ship racing championship, it has long since become a large festival with many popular bands playing on public stages. They often play for free, although the corporate sponsors (many from the Schleswig-Holstein media and telecommunications industry) usually display their involvement prominently. Most of the stages can be found at the Kiellinie (the western side of the Kieler Förde from the Düsternbrook yacht harbor past the Schleswig-Holstein parliament building to the big inner city ferry harbor), and as of late, across the Hoernbridge to the Germania harbor and the Hörn. Another area of rich cultural activity is the city center (Rathausplatz, Holstenbrücke) and the area connecting the city center with the ferry harbor (Alter Markt, Dänische Straße, Schloßpark). Between the public stages and especially on the International Market on the Rathausplatz, food specialties from different countries can be eaten. Small street performances and street comedy are performed in many places. A special children's program is available at the Spiellinie.

Kiel Week is also one of the largest tall ship conventions in Germany, attracting many German and international traditional ships, mainly sailing ships. Many of them spend the week doing day tours out of Kiel, thus berthing much more in view of the festival visitors than the racing boats at Kiel-Schilksee. More than 100 traditional ships and hundreds of yachts usually participate in the Tall Ships Parade (Windjammer‎parade) on the day before the closing day of the Kiel Week, i.e. usually on the second Saturday of Kiel Week. The Parade was first held in 1972, under the name of Operation Sail, and was organized in celebration of the Olympic Summer Games in Germany that year, whose sailing competitions took place in Kiel. It was the first large gathering of tall ships since the time of the windjammers, and its success led to the annual Parade and to the foundation of the first sail training organization in Germany (Clipper DJS). Today, the Parade is often headed by the Gorch Fock, a sister ship to the German-built USCGC Eagle (WIX-327).

Kiel Week Poster

Since 1948, advertises an annual Kiel Week poster for the festival week. Their design is another example of the cultural positioning and visual-design tradition of the Kieler Woche. In this context represents a jury put together a selection of graphic designers and then invites them to a competition for the corporate design of the festival week. An invitation is already an honor, because the design contest enjoys a high reputation and many designs have been awarded national and international prizes.

Among other things, the following graphic artists designed for the Kiel Week: Ernst Irmler (1953), Anton Stankowski (1962), Hans Hillmann (1964), Michael Engelmann (1965), Bruno K. Wiese (1971 & 1982), Rolf Müller (, 1972), Otto Treumann (1975), Ruedi Baur (1986), Rosemarie Tissi (1990), Hans Günther Schmitz (1992), Christof Gassner (1993), Siegfried Odermatt (1994), Barbara & Gerd Baumann (1995), Wim Crouwel (1998 ), Fons M. Hickmann (2002), Klaus Hesse (2006), Markus Dressen (2007), Peter Zizka (2008), Henning Wagenbreth (2009), Andrew and Jeffrey Goldstein (2010), Melchior Imboden (2011) and Stefan Guzy and Björn re (2015).

The series of Kieler Woche placards considered as a reflection of the recent graphic story. The motifs are applied to many objects and almost all of these - mostly developed by the competition winner himself - applications reach after a short time collector status.

History

Kieler Woche 01
Kiel Week, probably in 1895 (Fritz Stoltenberg)
  • June 23, 1882 20 sailing yachts (one of them Danish) participate in a ship race from Düsternbrook. Because of the large success the event is held annually in the following years.
  • 1889 The German Emperor Wilhelm II visits the ship races for the first time.
  • 1892 More than 100 ships announce themselves for the ship races.
  • 1894 The event is called Kiel Week for the first time in press reports. Emperor Wilhelm II is a regular visitor now.
  • 1895 Opening of the Kiel Canal, then called Kaiser-Wilhelm-Kanal during Kiel Week.
  • 1907 25th anniversary of Kiel Week. Since then more than 6,000 ships have been racing at the event.
  • 1914 New canal locks are opened during Kiel Week. On June 28, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria is murdered in Sarajevo, leading to World War I and interrupting Kiel Week. Between 1915-1918 Kiel Week is not held.
  • 1934 Kiel Week becomes an instrument of propaganda for the Nazis.
  • 1936 For the first time, Kiel is the location for the sailing contests at the Summer Olympics.
  • 1937 Kiel Week is organized by the newly formed Yacht-Club von Deutschland.
  • 1940–1946 During World War II, Kiel Week does not happen.
  • 1945 The first sailing week after the Second World War is held by the British occupation army under the name "Kiel-Week".
  • 1947 A festival week in September is held under the name 'Kiel im Aufbau' ('Kiel in reconstruction').
  • * End of June 1948 First Kiel Week after the war.
  • September 1948 "Kiel im Aufbau" held for the second time.
  • 1949 "Kiel im Aufbau" integrated into Kiel Week.
  • 1950 Theodor Heuss is the first President of Germany to visit Kiel Week.
  • 1962 Important Scandinavian theatre groups and orchestras set new accents for the cultural part of Kiel Week.
  • 1972 For the second time the sailing contests at the Summer Olympics are held in Kiel, finishing with a Tall Ships Parade.
  • 1974 The Spiellinie becomes a permanent institution at Kiel Week after the initial success of the Olympic Spielstraße for children in 1972. It is established along the Kiellinie.
  • 1982 100 years of Kiel Week celebrations.
  • 1994 100th Kiel Week celebrations (during the First and Second World Wars, Kiel Week was suspended); co-operation agreement with boot Düsseldorf.
  • 1995 100 years of the Kiel Canal (formerly Kaiser-Wilhelm-Canal) celebrations.

Classes

Olympic classes

2.4mR black 470 blue 49er black Finn black
470 dinghy 49er skiff FX skiff Finn dinghy
2.4 Metre
Open
470
M W
49er
M
49erFX
W
Finn
M
Sailing laser Sailing laser Sonar red.svg
Laser dinghy Laser Radial Nacra 17 Sonar (keelboat)
Laser
M
Laser Radial
W
Nacra 17
Mix
Sonar_(keelboat)
Open

International classes

29er black 420 black.svg 505 black Contender
420 plan
29er 420 505 Bavaria B/One Contender
Europe (Bootsklasse) Flying Dutchman insigna HobieLogo J 24 blue.svg
Europe dinghy Flying Dutchman (dinghy) Formula 18 (catamaran)
Europe Flying Dutchman Formula 18 Hobie 16 J/24
Sailing laser Sailing laser Mustoskiff Black Red copy Nordic Folkboat black.svg OK-Jolle red
Laser Radial Nordic folkboat drawing
Laser 4.7 Laser Radial
M
Musto Performance Skiff Nordic Folkboat OK

Offshore classes

Winners

Current Olympic classes

Men's 470

Women's 470

49er

49er FX

Men's Finn

Men's Laser

Women's Laser Radial

Nacra 17

Men's RS:X

Women's RS:X

Men's classes

Men's Europe

  • 1987 – Sweden Henrik Jacobsen
  • 1988 – Norway Peer Moberg
  • 1989 – Italy Valerio Chinca
  • 1990 – Denmark Kim Christensen
  • 1991 – Denmark Jan Christiansen
  • 1992 – Denmark Søren Johnsen
  • 1993 – Denmark Søren Johnsen
  • 1994 – Denmark Søren Johnsen
  • 1995 – Germany Kai Redemann
  • 1996 – Germany Bernhard Krüger
  • 1997 – Poland Jacek Zbierski
  • 1998 – Poland Jacek Zbierski
  • 1999 – Poland Jacek Zbierski
  • 2000 – Norway Mats Wang-Hansen
  • 2001 – Germany Tim Kirchhoff
  • 2002 – Denmark Søren Johnsen
  • 2003 – Denmark Søren Johnsen
  • 2004 – Denmark Mikkel Bonde

Men's Star

Women's classes

Women's Elliott 6m

Women's Europe

Women's Mistral

Open classes

12 Metre

  • 2015 – United States Anitra – Josef Martin, Sven Oliver Buder, Tim Eggert, Peter Graf, Oliver Huber, Dierck Jensen, Andre Koslowsky, Johann Kraus, Wolfgang Leuthe, Björn Leuthe, Sven Martin, Petra Mehrbad, David Segbert & Ulli Sommerlath
  • 2016 – United States Vim – Andrea Proto, Peter Müller, Ole Skov, Natale Proto, Mads Groth, Troels Bækholm, Nikolaj Nielsen, Caspar Kiellerop Larsen, Stefan Zeyse, Jens Holmberg, Jens Möller, Leerke Nergaavel, Tommy Olsson, Lef Motte, Mads Walther, & Stig Westergaard[17]
  • 2017 – Denmark Kiwi Magic – Johan Blach Petersen & crew[18]

2.4 Metre

29er

  • 2005 – Germany Benjamin Friedhoff & Johanna Munding
  • 2006 – Germany Benjamin Friedhoff & Johanna Munding
  • 2007 – Germany Benjamin Friedhoff & Johanna Munding
  • 2008 – France Kévin Fischer & Glenn Gouron
  • 2009 – France Kévin Fischer & Glenn Gouron
  • 2010 – Croatia Domagoj Fizulic & Tomislav Bašić
  • 2011 – Australia Josh Franklin & Lewis Brake
  • 2012 – Spain Carlos Robles & Florian Trittel
  • 2013 – France Lucas Rual & Emile Amoro
  • 2014 – Sweden Adrian Salamon & Julius Hallstrom
  • 2015 – Slovenia Peter Lin Janezic & Anze Podlogar
  • 2016 – Germany Gwendal Lamay & Luke Willim[21]
  • 2017 – France Benjamin Jaffrezic & Léo Chauvel[22]

420

  • 1987 – West Germany Jens Olbrysch
  • 1988 – West Germany Stefanie Wagner
  • 1989 – France Luc Angels
  • 1990 – West Germany Marcus Bauer
  • 1991 – Israel Zeev Kalach & Shamgar Gurevich
  • 1992 – Germany Uta Kock
  • 1993 – Germany Schütt & Eberhardt
  • 1994 – United Kingdom Robert Greenhalgh & Peter Greenhalgh
  • 1996 – Switzerland Etienne Huter & Pierre Huter
  • 1997 – Belgium Xavier Vandeghinste & Quentin Blondieu
  • 1998 – France Nicolas Charbonnier & David Deguine
  • 1999 – Denmark Allan Nørregaard & Henrik Jorgensen
  • 2000 – Italy Luca Bursic & Jacob Thomas
  • 2001 – South Korea Jong-woo Park & Dong-woo Lee
  • 2002 – United Kingdom Nic Asher & Elliot Willis
  • 2003 – Spain José Antonio Medina Ruiz & Onán Barreiros
  • 2004 – Australia Nathan Outteridge & Iain Jensen
  • 2005 – India Farokh Tarapore & Vikas Kapila
  • 2006 – Germany Susanne Baur & Katharina Berggren
  • 2007 – Germany Florian Dziesiaty & Oliver Szymanski
  • 2008 – Italy Maccari Federico & Vitali Rocco
  • 2009 – United Kingdom Philip Sparks & Ben Gratton
  • 2010 – Singapore Justin Liu & Sherman Cheng
  • 2011 – Australia Angus Galloway & Alexander Gough
  • 2012 – Chile Nadja Horwitz & Francisca Fuentes
  • 2013 – Germany Jan Borbet & Kilian Northoff
  • 2014 – Israel Abu Maor & Rooz Yoav
  • 2015 – United States Wiley Rogers & Jack Parkin
  • 2016 – United States Wiley Rogers & Jack Parkin[23]
  • 2017 – Greece Telis Athanasopoulos Yogo & Dimitrios Tassios[24]

5.5 Metre

  • 2016 – Germany Ger Schmitz, Uli Ellerbeck, & Gerhard Kruse[25]
  • 2017 – Germany Hans Köster, Johannes Hensler, Jacob Oersted, & Lea Rüdiger[26]

505

  • 1994 – Germany Tim Böger & Holger Jess
  • 1995 – United Kingdom Jeremy Robinson & Bill Masterman
  • 1996 – Germany Thomas Gosch & Rolf Meyer
  • 1997 – Germany Wolfgang Hunger & Holger Jess
  • 1998 – Germany Wolfgang Hunger & Holger Jess
  • 1999 – Germany Wolfgang Hunger & Holger Jess
  • 2000 – Germany Wolfgang Hunger & Holger Jess
  • 2001 – Sweden Krister Bergstrom & Thomas Moss
  • 2002 – Germany Wolfgang Hunger & Holger Jess
  • 2003 – Germany Claas Lehmann & Martin Schöler
  • 2004 – Germany Wolfgang Hunger & Holger Jess
  • 2005 – Germany Claas Lehmann & Martin Schöler
  • 2006 – Denmark Jan Saugmann & Morten Ramsbaek
  • 2007 – Germany Wolfgang Hunger & Holger Jess
  • 2008 – Germany Wolfgang Hunger & Julien Kleiner
  • 2009 – Germany Wolfgang Hunger & Julien Kleiner
  • 2010 – Germany Wolfgang Hunger & Julien Kleiner
  • 2011 – Germany Wolfgang Hunger & Julien Kleiner
  • 2012 – Germany Wolfgang Hunger & Julien Kleiner
  • 2013 – Germany Wolfgang Hunger & Julien Kleiner
  • 2014 – Germany Jan-Philipp Hofmann & Felix Brockerhoff
  • 2015 – Germany Meike Schomäker & Holger Jess
  • 2016 – United Kingdom Andy Smith & Tim Needham[27]
  • 2017 – Denmark Jørgen Bojsen-Møller & Jacob Bojsen-Møller[28]

Albin Ballad

  • 2016 – Germany Michael Langhans, Jan Lok, Birgit Ehlers, & Thomas Wiese[29]
  • 2015 – Germany Klaus Lange

Albin Express

  • 2015 – Sweden Arne K. Larssen
  • 2016 – Germany Jan Brink, Jan Günther, Jörg Rüterhenke, & Jens Lücke[30]
  • 2017 – Germany Jan Brink, Jörg Rüterhenke, Lasse Waltje, & Jan Günther[31]

Contender

  • 1995 – Germany Jan von der Bank
  • 1996 – United Kingdom Graham Scott
  • 1997 – United Kingdom Ian Renilson
  • 1998 – Italy Andreas Bonezzi
  • 1999 – Denmark Claus Staffe
  • 2000 – Denmark Claus Staffe
  • 2001 – Germany Gabriel Wicke
  • 2002 – Italy Andreas Bonezzi
  • 2003 – Germany Jan von der Bank
  • 2004 – Italy Andreas Bonezzi
  • 2005 – Germany Jan von der Bank
  • 2006 – Italy Andreas Bonezzi
  • 2007 – Germany Jan van der Bank
  • 2008 – Germany Christoph Homeier
  • 2009 – Germany Jan von der Bank
  • 2010 – Denmark Bjarke Johnsen
  • 2011 – Germany Christoph Homeier
  • 2012 – Denmark Sören Andreasen Dulong
  • 2013 – Australia Mark Bulka
  • 2014 – Denmark Søren Dulong Andreasen
  • 2015 – Denmark Jesper Nielsen
  • 2016 – Denmark Søren Dulong Andreasen[32]
  • 2017 – Denmark Jesper Nielsen[33]

Europe

  • 2005 – Denmark Jacob Ege Friis
  • 2006 – Finland Teemu Rantanen
  • 2007 – Denmark Christian Rindom
  • 2008 – Germany Sönke Herrmann
  • 2009 – France Thomas Ribeaud
  • 2010 – France Sylvain Notonier
  • 2011 – France Sylvain Notonier
  • 2012 – France Sylvain Notonier
  • 2013 – Norway Lars Johan Brodtkorb
  • 2014 – Denmark Anna Munch
  • 2015 – Germany Fabian Kirchhoff
  • 2016 – Norway Lars Johan Brodtkorb
  • 2017 – Denmark Anna Livbjerg
  • 2016 – Norway Lars Johan Brodtorb[34]
  • 2017 – Denmark Anna Livbjerg[35]

Farr 30

  • 2015 – Germany Harald Brüning

Flying Dutchman

Formula 18

H-boat

  • 1987 – Finland Juhani Seppae
  • 1988 – West Germany Gerd Eiermann
  • 1989 – West Germany Gerd Eiermann
  • 1990 – Sweden Henrik Edmann
  • 1991 – Germany Gerd Eiermann
  • 1992 – Denmark Theis Palm
  • 1993 – Germany Vincent Hösch
  • 1994 – Germany Vincent Hösch, Wolfgang Nothegger & Stefan Abel
  • 1995 – United States Ross McDonald, Phil Trinter & Hugo Dölfes
  • 1996 – Germany Wolfgang Döring, Butze Bredt & Sönke Wunderlich
  • 1997 – Denmark Herluf Jörgensen, Chrestian Pasbjerg & Sören Nielsen
  • 1998 – Denmark Herluf Jörgensen, Chrestian Pasbjerg & Per Petersen
  • 1999 – Denmark Bo Selko, Jonas Pedersen & Niels Sörensen
  • 2000 – Denmark Bo Selko, Jonas Pedersen & Kenneth Bogild
  • 2001 – Germany Dirk Stadler, Nils Ubert & Kai Schnellbacher
  • 2002 – Denmark Herluf Jörgensen, Chrestian Pasbjerg & Fin Nicolaisen
  • 2003 – Germany Harald Wefers, Niels Körte & Soenke Asta Durst
  • 2004 – Denmark Herluf Jörgensen, Chrestian Pasbjerg & Christian Justesen
  • 2005 – Denmark Morten Nielsen, Per Kloster & Niels Hendrik Borch
  • 2006 – Netherlands Hans Peulen, Patrick Vraneken & Peter Snellens
  • 2007 – Denmark Steffen Stegger, Lars Christiansen & Carsten Pedersen Guffi
  • 2008 – Denmark Steffen Stegger, Lars Christiansen & Carsten Pedersen Guffi
  • 2009 – Denmark Steffen Stegger, Lars Christiansen & Carsten Pedersen Guffi
  • 2010 – Denmark Mads P. G. Korsgaard, Uffe Dreiser & Anders Rydlöv
  • 2011 – Denmark Steffen Stegger, Lars Christiansen & Carsten Pedersen Guffi
  • 2012 – Denmark Steffen Stegger, Lars Christiansen & Carsten Pedersen Guffi
  • 2015 – Germany Peter Zauner, Timo von Schorlemer, Maren Bertling & Frank Hummel

Hobie 16

  • 2015 – Germany Detlef Mohr & Karen Wichardt
  • 2016 – Germany Ingo Delius & Kai Tittjung[40]
  • 2017 – Germany Knud Jansen & Christina Schober[41]

J/24

  • 2015 – United Kingdom Ian Southworth
  • 2016 – Germany Tobias Feuerherdt, Jan-Marc Ulrich, Lukas Feuerherdt, Tobias Peters, & Justus Fritz Kellner[42]
  • 2017 – United States Mike Ingham, Max Holzer, Marianne Schoke, Quinn Schwenker, & Paul Abdullah[43]

J/70

  • 2015 – Spain Hugo Rocha
  • 2017 – Germany Jens Marten, Justus Braatz, Terje Klockemann, & Tobias Strenge[44]

J/80

  • 2015 – Germany Martin Menzner
  • 2016 – Germany Martin Menzner, Mika Rolfs, Frank Lichte, & Nils Beltermann[45]
  • 2017 – Germany Martin Menzner, Frank Lichte, Mika Rolfs, & Nils Beltermann[46]

Laser 4.7

  • 2015 – Germany Julia Büsselberg
  • 2016 – Belarus Maksim Dziahel[47]
  • 2017 – Norway Tobias Sandmo Birkeland[48]

Laser Radial

  • 2015 – United States Haddon Hughes
  • 2016 – Finland Aleksi Tapper[49]
  • 2017 – Norway Caroline Sofia Rosmo[50]

Melges 24

  • 2015 – Denmark Kim Christensen
  • 2016 – Italy Andrea Pozzi, Stefan Ciampalini, Giuluo Desiderato, Carlo Zermini, & Nicolas Dal Ferro[51]
  • 2017 – Germany Lennart Burke, Johan Müller, Valentin Ahlhaus, Daniel Schmidt, & Thore Petersen[52]

Musto Skiff

  • 2015 – United Kingdom Ben Schooling
  • 2016 – Germany Frithjof Schwerdt[53]

Nordic Folkboat

  • 1957 – Denmark Ejnar Christensen
  • 1958 – Denmark Henning Olsen
  • 1959 – Denmark Ejnar Christensen
  • 1960 – Denmark Christian Lageri-Schmidt
  • 1961 – Denmark Henning Olsen
  • 1962 – Denmark Børge Jespersen
  • 1963 – Denmark Mogens Petersen
  • 1964 – Denmark Mogens Petersen
  • 1965 – Denmark Mogens Petersen
  • 1966 – West Germany G. Kroll
  • 1967 – Denmark Claus Hjort, Ove Hjort & Karsten Ask
  • 1968 – Denmark Claus Hjort, Ove Hjort & Karsten Ask
  • 1969 – Denmark Claus Hjort, Ove Hjort & Karsten Ask
  • 1970 – Denmark Claus Hjort, Ove Hjort & Karsten Ask
  • 1971 – West Germany Walther Muhs
  • 1972 – West Germany Andreas Christiansen & Knud Christiansen
  • 1973 – Denmark Claus Hjort, Ove Hjort & Karsten Ask
  • 1974 – Denmark Claus Hjort, Ove Hjort & Karsten Ask
  • 1975 – Denmark Erik Andreasen, Jørgen Knudsen & Chresten Kold
  • 1976 – Denmark Claus Hjort, Ove Hjort & Karsten Ask
  • 1977 – Denmark Flemming Hansen, Niels Andersen & Bent Christensen
  • 1978 – Denmark Ernst August Rasmussen, Klaus Rasmussen & Aksel Andreasen
  • 1979 – West Germany Dieter Kipcke
  • 1980 – Denmark Henrik Kold
  • 1981 – Denmark Erik Andereasen, Peter West, Jens Budtz & Mogens Pedersen
  • 1982 – Denmark Henrik Sørensen, John Skjoldby & Erling Rasmussen
  • 1983 – Denmark Erik Andreasen
  • 1984 – Denmark Rene Mørch, Lauge Larsen & Stig Pallisbeck
  • 1985 – Denmark Rene Mørch, Lauge Larsen & Stig Pallisbeck
  • 1986 – Denmark Erik Andreasen, Lotte Andreasen, Bjørn Clausen & Mette S. Andersen
  • 1987 – Denmark Rene Mørch, John Skjoldby & Lauge Larsen
  • 1988 – West Germany Horst Stephan Schultze
  • 1987 – Denmark Rene Moerck
  • 1988 – West Germany Thorsten Dmach
  • 1989 – Denmark Erik Andreasen
  • 1990 – West Germany Manfred Baum
  • 1991 – Denmark Flemming Rost
  • 1992 – Germany Jürgen Breitenbach
  • 1993 – Germany H. Reese
  • 1994 – Denmark Erik Andreasen, Paul Ankjaer & Mogens Pedersen
  • 1995 – Denmark Jesper Bendix, Jacob Gronsbach & Jesper Baungaard
  • 1996 – Denmark Torben Olesen, Lars Dalborge & Palle Hemdorf
  • 1997 – Denmark Peter Due, Kurt Petersen & Ole Christensen
  • 1998 – Denmark Henrik Kold, Claus Skov Nielsen & Jens Lorentzen
  • 1999 – Denmark Henrik Kold, Claus Skov Nielsen & Per Hovmark
  • 2000 – Denmark Jens Thuroe, Mette Thuroe & Knud Andersen
  • 2001 – Denmark Kim Fogde, Peter Andersen & Tonny Poulsen
  • 2002 – Denmark Per Hovmark, Soren Bredal & Claus Lauritsen
  • 2003 – Denmark Per Jørgensen, Lars Jørgensen
  • 2004 – Denmark Kim Koch Fodge, Tonny Povlsen & Allan Hansen
  • 2005 – Denmark Per Jørgensen, Lars Jørgensen & Claus Skov Nielsen
  • 2006 – Germany Christoph Nielsen, Torben Dehn & Björge Dehn
  • 2007 – Germany Christoph Nielsen, Torben Dehn & Jimi Reichenberger
  • 2008 – Denmark Per Jørgensen, Lars Jørgensen & Kristian Hansen
  • 2009 – Germany Christoph Nielsen, Torben Dehn & Krzystof Paschke
  • 2010 – Denmark Per Jørgensen, Kristian Hansen & Kjeld Skov
  • 2011 – Denmark John Wulff, Benny Christensen & Bent Mallemuk Nielsen
  • 2012 – Germany Walther Furthmann, Hans Christian Mrowka & Paul Grolstein
  • 2013 – Germany Christoph Nielsen, Florian Raudaschel, Torben Dehn & Klaus Reichenberger
  • 2014 – Denmark Per Buch, Hans Schultz & Per Puck
  • 2015 – Germany Ulf Kipcke, Dieter Kipcke & Gero Martens
  • 2016 – Germany Ulf Kipcke, Dieter Kipcke, & Gero Martens[54]
  • 2017 – Denmark Per Jørgensen, Kristian Hansen, & Bent Nielsen[55]

OK

  • 2015 – United Kingdom Charlie Cumbley
  • 2016 – Sweden Thomas Hansson-Mild[56]
  • 2017 – United Kingdom Jim Hunt[57]

RS800

  • 2015 – United Kingdom Phil Walker & John Mather

Sonar

  • 2014 – Germany Jens Kroker, Robert Prem & Siggy Mainka
  • 2016 – Germany Lasse Klötzing, Siegmund Mainka, & Jens Kroker[58]

See also

References

  • George von Hase (c. 1920). Kiel and Jutland. Skeffington and son Ltd.. Description by a German officer of the visit by a squadron of British warships attending Kiel week in June 1914. Available at Canadian library archive
  • Übersicht der Klassen zur Kieler Woche, retrieved 13 October 2015
  • Olympische Klassen zur Kieler Woche, retrieved 13 October 2015
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    Kiel Travel Guide (About.com)
    The world’s largest sailing event: Kiel Week (deutschland.de)
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