Ki Aldrich

Charles Collins "Ki" Aldrich (June 1, 1916 – March 12, 1983) was an American football player. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1960.

Ki Aldrich
Ki Aldrich
No. 55
Position:Center / Linebacker
Personal information
Born:June 1, 1916
Rogers, Texas
Died:March 12, 1983 (aged 66)
Temple, Texas
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:207 lb (94 kg)
Career information
High school:Temple (TX)
College:Texas Christian
NFL Draft:1939 / Round: 1 / Pick: 1
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:73
Interceptions:8
Touchdowns:2
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early life

Aldrich was born in Rogers, Texas and attended Temple High School in Temple, Texas, where he was named All-State as a center in 1934.[1] He was an All-American center at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas. At TCU, he played alongside two legendary quarterbacks—Sammy Baugh and Davey O'Brien. Aldrich's senior year, 1938, the Horned Frogs won the National Championship, finishing 11-0 and winning the Sugar Bowl.

Professional career

The Chicago Cardinals made Aldrich the first selection in the 1939 NFL Draft, in which his TCU teammates O'Brien and I. B. Hale also were selected in the top ten. He played two seasons for the Cardinals before moving to the Washington Redskins. After two seasons in Washington, he left to serve in the Navy during World War II.[2] He returned to the Redskins in 1945, and retired in 1947. During his professional career, Aldrich averaged 50 minutes of playing time per game.[1]

After football

After retiring from football, Aldirch served as the superintendent at the Lena Pope Orphanage in Fort Worth, Texas.[2] His first wife was the daughter of the founder. He died March 12, 1983 in Temple, Texas.[2]

Legacy

His coach at TCU, Dutch Meyer, said of Aldrich: "That boy wanted to play football more than anyone I ever knew."[2] Baugh called him "the toughest player I ever knew."[2] Aldrich was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1960[2] and was named to the Southwest Conference's All-Time Team in 1969.

References

  1. ^ a b "Inductees". Texas Sports Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2015-10-23.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Ki Aldrich". College Football Hall of Fame. Football Foundation. Retrieved 2015-10-23.

External links

1937 All-Southwest Conference football team

The 1937 All-Southwest Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Southwest Conference teams for the 1937 college football season. The selectors for the 1937 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1937 College Football All-America Team

The 1937 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1937. The ten selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1937 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the United Press (UP), (4) the All-America Board (AAB), (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Liberty magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) Newsweek, (9) the North American Newspaper Alliance (NANA), and (10) the Sporting News (SN).

1937 Cotton Bowl Classic

The 1937 Cotton Bowl Classic, the first Cotton Bowl Classic game and part of the 1936–37 bowl game season, took place on January 1, 1937, at the Cotton Bowl in Dallas, Texas. The competing teams were the Marquette Golden Avalanche, competing as a football independent, and the TCU Horned Frogs, representing the Southwest Conference (SWC) as conference champions. TCU won the inaugural contest, 16–6.

1937 TCU Horned Frogs football team

The 1937 TCU Horned Frogs football team represented Texas Christian University (TCU) in the 1937 college football season. The team was coached by Dutch Meyer in his fourth year as head coach, finishing the season 4–4–2 (3–1–2 SWC). The offense scored 89 points while the defense allowed 72 points. The Frogs played their home games in Amon G. Carter Stadium, which is located on campus in Fort Worth, Texas.

1938 All-Southwest Conference football team

The 1938 All-Southwest Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Southwest Conference teams for the 1938 college football season. The selectors for the 1938 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1938 College Football All-America Team

The 1938 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1938. The nine selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1938 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press, (3) the United Press, (4) the All-America Board, (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Liberty magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) Newsweek, and (9) the Sporting News.

Four players were unanimous All-Americans on all of the major All-American teams: TCU quarterback (and 1938 Heisman Trophy winner) Davey O'Brien, Pittsburgh fullback Marshall Goldberg, Michigan guard Ralph Heikkinen and Notre Dame tackle Ed Beinor.

1938 TCU Horned Frogs football team

The 1938 TCU Horned Frogs football team represented Texas Christian University (TCU) in the 1938 college football season. The team was coached by Dutch Meyer in his fifth year as head coach. The Horned Frogs finished with an undefeated 11–0 season. At season's end, Davey O'Brien won the Heisman Trophy and the Horned Frogs were crowned as national champions by the AP Poll. The offense scored 269 points while the defense allowed 60 points. The Horned Frogs played their home games in Amon G. Carter Stadium, which is located on campus in Fort Worth, Texas.

1939 NFL season

The 1939 NFL season was the 20th regular season of the National Football League. Before the season, NFL president Joseph Carr died, and Carl Storck was named to replace him.

An NFL game was televised for the first time when NBC broadcast a Brooklyn Dodgers–Philadelphia Eagles game. The experimental broadcast was broadcast only to viewers in New York and Albany; regular broadcasting of NFL games would not begin until 1951.

The season ended when the Green Bay Packers defeated the New York Giants in the NFL Championship Game.

1939 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1939 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise's 7th season in the National Football League. The team failed to improve on their previous output of 5–6, winning only one game. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the seventh consecutive season. The October 22 game against Brooklyn was the first NFL game to be televised.

1939 Sugar Bowl

The 1939 Sugar Bowl featured the TCU Horned Frogs and Carnegie Tech Tartans.

1940 National Football League All-Star Game (January)

The 1940 National Football League All-star Game was the professional football league's second all-star game. The game pitted the Green Bay Packers, the league's champion for the 1939 season, against a team of all-stars. The game was played on Sunday, January 14, 1940, at Gilmore Stadium in Los Angeles, California in front of 18,000 fans. The Packers defeated the all-stars by a score of 16–7. The game was originally scheduled to be played on the previous Sunday, but it was delayed due to rain.The players on the all-star squad were selected by a national poll of fans. Wilbur Crowell was the referee for the game.

1942 National Football League All-Star Game (December)

The 1942 National Football League All-Star Game (December) was the National Football League's fifth all-star game. The game pitted the Washington Redskins, the league's champion for the 1942 season, against a team of all-stars. The game was played on Sunday, December 27, 1942, at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in front of 18,671 fans. The All-Stars defeated the Redskins by a score of 17–14.Due to World War II, the All-Star Game was canceled following 1942 as travel restrictions were imposed. It would not return until 1951 as the Pro Bowl, with the champions vs. all-stars format changed to between divisions to avoid confusion with the Chicago College All-Star Game.

Aldrich (surname)

Aldrich is an Old English surname. Notable persons with that surname include:

Abby Aldrich (1874–1948), American philanthropist

Allison Aldrich (born 1988), American Paralympic volleyball player

Ann Aldrich (1927–2010), American federal judge

Bailey Aldrich (1907–2002), American judge

Bess Streeter Aldrich (1881–1954), American author

Charles H. Aldrich (1850–1929), former Solicitor General of the United States

Charlie Aldrich (born 1918), American musician

Chester Hardy Aldrich (1862–1924), American politician from Nebraska

Chester Holmes Aldrich (1871–1940), American architect

Clark Aldrich, American author

Cole Aldrich (born 1988), American basketball player

Cyrus Aldrich (1808–1871), American politician

Daniel Aldrich (1918–1990), American educator

David Aldrich (1907–2002), American artist

David E. Aldrich (born 1963), American cinematographer

Doug Aldrich (born 1964), American guitarist

Edgar Aldrich (1848–1921), American judge

Erin Aldrich (born 1977), American athlete

Fred Aldrich (1904–1979), American actor

Frederick Aldrich (1907–2002), American marine biologist

Gary Aldrich (born 1945), former American FBI agent

Hazen Aldrich (1797–1873), American religious figure

Henry Aldrich (1647–1710), English theologian and philosopher

Henry Carl Aldrich (1941–2005), American mycologist

Herman D. Aldrich (1801-1880), American businessman.

Howard E. Aldrich (b. 1940s), American sociologist

J. Frank Aldrich (1853–1933), American politician

James Aldrich (1810–1856), American editor and poet

James Aldrich (politician) (1850–1910), American judge and politician from South Carolina

Janet Aldrich, American actress and singer

Jay Aldrich (born 1961), American baseball player

Jeremy Aldrich (born 1977), American soccer player

John Aldrich (political scientist) (born 1947), American political scientist

John Aldrich (MP) (1520–1582), British Member of Parliament

John Merton Aldrich (1866–1934), zoologist and entomologist

John Warren Aldrich (1906–1995), American ornithologist

Julia Carter Aldrich (1834-1924), American author

Kate Aldrich (born 1973), American singer

Ki Aldrich (1916–1983), American football player

Larry Aldrich (1906–2001), American fashion designer

Lloyd Aldrich (1886–1967), American engineer

Louis Aldrich (1843–1901), American actor

Loyal Blaine Aldrich (1884–1965), American astronomer

Lucy Aldrich (1869–1955), American philanthropist

Mal Aldrich (1900–1986), American football player

Mariska Aldrich (1881–1965), American singer and actress

Mark Aldrich (1802–1873), American politician and mayor

Michael Aldrich (1941–2014), English inventor and entrepreneur

Mildred Aldrich (1853–1928), American journalist and writer

Nelson W. Aldrich (1841–1915), American politician from Rhode Island

Nelson W. Aldrich Jr. (born 1935), American editor and author

Pelham Aldrich (1844–1930), English Royal Navy officer and explorer

Pieter Aldrich (born 1965), South African tennis player

Putnam Aldrich (1904–1975), American musician and professor

Richard Aldrich (music critic) (1863–1937), American music critic

Richard Aldrich (artist) (born 1975), American painter

Richard S. Aldrich (1884–1941), American lawyer and politician

Richard W. Aldrich, American neuroscientist

Robert Aldrich (1918–1983), American film director

Robert Aldrich (bishop), Anglican bishop

Robert Aldrich (historian), Australian historian and writer

Ronnie Aldrich (1916–1993), British musician

Sarah Aldrich (born 1970), American actress

Stephen Aldrich (born 1941), American judge

Susannah Valentine Aldrich (1828-1915), American author, hymnwriter

Thomas A. Aldrich (born 1923), American soldier and major general

Thomas Bailey Aldrich (1836–1907), American writer

Truman H. Aldrich (1848–1932), American engineer and paleontologist

Virgil Aldrich (1903–1998), Indian–American philosopher

William Aldrich (1820–1885), American politician and representative

William F. Aldrich (1853–1925), American politician and representative

Winthrop W. Aldrich (1885–1974), American financier

Bob Johnson (American football)

Robert Douglas Johnson (born August 19, 1946) is a former American football center who played 12 seasons with the Cincinnati Bengals, first in the American Football League, and then in the National Football League.

Darrell Lester

Darrell George Lester (April 29, 1914 – July 30, 1993) was a two-time All-American center for Texas Christian University in the 1930s.

A native of Jacksboro, Texas, Lester was not only a great football player at TCU. He earned nine varsity letters in all, also playing center on the Horned Frogs' basketball team and pitching for the baseball team.

It was football, though, where Lester made his mark. He was the first player in Southwest Conference history to be named consensus All-American twice, earning that honor in both 1934 and 1935. He is the only Horned Frog to be named a two-time consensus All-American. He was a captain on the 1935 team, and along with Sammy Baugh led the Frogs to a 12-1 record and a Sugar Bowl victory over LSU. His successor at center for TCU was Ki Aldrich, who was himself a two-time All-American.

Lester was drafted by the Green Bay Packers and played for them for two seasons before retiring due to an injury. After football, Lester served in the U.S. Army Air Corps in World War II. In the postwar period, he worked for General Mills and was one of the founders of the Bluebonnet Bowl in Houston. He retired to Temple, Texas. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1988 and died in 1993.

List of Arizona Cardinals first-round draft picks

The Arizona Cardinals are a professional American football franchise based in Glendale, Arizona. The Cardinals compete in the National Football League as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) West division. The Cardinals were founded as the Morgan Athletic Club in 1898, and are the oldest continuously run professional football team in the World.Officially known as the NFL Draft, the event is the NFL's primary mechanism for distributing newly professional players finished with their college football careers to its teams. The draft order is determined based on the previous season's standings; the teams with the worst win–loss records receive the earliest picks. Teams that qualified for the NFL playoffs select after non-qualifiers, and their order depends on how far they advanced. The final two selections in the first round are reserved for the Super Bowl runner-up and champion. Draft picks are tradable, and players or other picks can be acquired with them.

List of first overall National Football League draft picks

This is a list of first overall National Football League draft picks. The National Football League draft is an annual sports draft in which NFL teams select newly eligible players for their rosters. To be eligible, a player must be out of high school at least three years. Each NFL franchise seeks to add new players through the annual NFL draft. The draft rules were last updated in 2009. The team with the worst record the previous year picks first, the next-worst team second, and so on. Teams also have the option to trade with another team to move up to a better draft position. Teams that did not make the playoffs are ordered by their regular-season record, with any remaining ties broken by strength of schedule. Playoff participants are sequenced after non-playoff teams, based on their round of elimination (wild card, division, conference, and Super Bowl).From 1947 through 1958 the first selection was awarded by a random draw. The team which received this "bonus" pick forfeited its selection in the final round of the draft. The winner of the "bonus pick" was eliminated from the draw in future years. By 1958 all twelve clubs in the league at the time had received a bonus choice and the system was abolished.Before the merger agreements in 1966, the American Football League (AFL) operated in direct competition with the NFL and held a separate draft. This led to a massive bidding war over top prospects between the two leagues, along with the subsequent drafting of the same player in each draft. As part of the merger agreement on June 8, 1966, the two leagues held a multiple round "Common Draft". Once the AFL officially merged with the NFL in 1970, the "Common Draft" simply became the NFL Draft.Through the 2018 NFL draft, 83 players have been selected first overall, with the most recent being Baker Mayfield. The Indianapolis Colts – formerly the Baltimore Colts – have made the most first overall selections in history with seven. Of the first overall draft picks, 43 have been selected to a Pro Bowl and of those 43, twelve have been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. While the Heisman Trophy is awarded annually to the most outstanding player in U.S. college football, only 21 of those Heisman winners have been selected first overall in the NFL draft. Only five first overall draft pick players have been selected the NFL Rookie of the Year: Earl Campbell (1978); Billy Sims (1980); George Rogers (1981); Sam Bradford (2010); and Cam Newton (2011).

TCU Horned Frogs football

The TCU Horned Frogs football team is the intercollegiate football team of Texas Christian University (TCU). The Horned Frogs compete in Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in the United States.

Since 2012, the Horned Frogs have been a member of the Big 12 Conference, and were previously members of the Mountain West Conference (MWC), Western Athletic Conference (WAC), Conference USA (C-USA), Southwest Conference (SWC), and Texas Intercollegiate Athletic Association (TIAA).

TCU began playing football in 1896 and claims national championships in 1935 and 1938. TCU has one Heisman Trophy winner, Davey O'Brien, and has had eight former players inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. The Horned Frogs play their home games in Amon G. Carter Stadium, which is located on the TCU campus in Fort Worth.

TCU ranks as the 28th best college football program of all time and the 4th best private college football school of all time, behind Notre Dame, USC, and Miami-FL. The Horned Frogs are also one of only four FBS teams to have played in all six College Football Playoff Bowls, winning all but the Fiesta and Orange.

In 2017, TCU and Coach Patterson reached their 10th 11 win season since Gary Patterson has been coaching for the program. That is the 4th most 11 win seasons since 2001 in all of college football.

Temple High School (Texas)

Temple High School is a public high school located in Temple, Texas, United States. As of the 2018–2020 biennial realignment, it is classified as a 6A school by the UIL. It is part of the Temple Independent School District located in central Bell County. In 2015, the school was rated "Met Standard" by the Texas Education Agency.Temple High School became an International Baccalaureate authorized school in 1992 and is currently one of 46 IB authorized high schools in Texas. To date, Temple High School has awarded over 100 IB diplomas.

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