Khadija Shaw

Khadija Monifa "Bunny" Shaw (born 31 January 1997) is a Jamaican footballer who plays as a forward for Girondins de Bordeaux and the Jamaica women's national team.

Khadija Shaw
Khadija Shaw
Personal information
Full name Khadija Monifa Shaw[1]
Date of birth 31 January 1997 (age 22)
Place of birth Spanish Town, Jamaica
Height 1.82 m (5 ft 11 12 in)
Playing position Forward
Club information
Current team
Girondins de Bordeaux
College career
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2015–2016 EFSC Titans 21 (24)
2017–2018 Tennessee Volunteers 35 (27)
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2018 Florida Krush 1 (1)
2019– Bordeaux 0 (0)
National team
2011–2012 Jamaica U17 8 (2)
2011–2012 Jamaica U20 7 (0)
2015– Jamaica 24 (31)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 7 June 2019
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 00:25, 12 June 2019

College career

Shaw played her first two years of junior college at Eastern Florida State College, earning NSCAA first-team National Junior College Athletic Association All-America honors in 2016.

In 2017, Shaw transferred to the University of Tennessee.[2] She was named to the All-SEC first team in both her seasons with Tennessee and was awarded SEC Offensive Player of the Year as a senior in 2018.[3] She decided against entering into the NWSL Draft after college in order to look at overseas options in Europe and Asia.[4]

Club career

In 2018, Shaw also played for WPSL semi-pro team Florida Krush.[5]

On June 7, 2019, D1 Féminine team Bordeaux announced they had signed Shaw on a two-year contract.[6][7]

International career

Shaw has played internationally at the U-15, U-17, U-20 and senior levels for Jamaica,[8] debuting for the former aged 14.[9]

Shaw made her senior international debut on August 23, 2015,scoring twice in a 6–0 victory over the Dominican Republic in an Olympic qualifying game.[10] In 2019, Shaw was part of the Jamaica team that qualified for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. In doing so, they became the first Caribbean nation to ever qualify for a Women's World Cup.[11]

International goals

Scores and results list Jamaica's goal tally first

No. Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1
23 August 2015 Estadio Panamericano, San Cristóbal, Dominican Republic  Dominican Republic
1–0
6–0
2016 CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualifying Championship qualification
2
3–0
3
25 August 2015  Dominica
13–0
4
9 May 2018 Stade Sylvio Cator, Port-au-Prince, Haiti  Guadeloupe
1–0
2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship qualification
5
4–0
6
5–0
7
7–0
8
9–0
9
11–0
10
11 May 2018  Martinique
3–0
3–0
11
13 May 2018  Haiti
2–2
2–2
12
19 July 2018 Estadio Moderno Julio Torres, Barranquilla, Colombia  Venezuela
1–0
1–2
2018 Central American and Caribbean Games
13
21 July 2018  Costa Rica
14
25 August 2018 National Stadium, Kingston, Jamaica  Antigua and Barbuda
3–0
9–0
2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship qualification
15
5–0
16
6–0
17
27 August 2018  Bermuda
3–0
4–0
18
31 August 2018  Trinidad and Tobago
2–1
4–1
19
3–1
20
2 September 2018  Cuba
2–0
6–1
21
5–0
22
8 October 2018 H-E-B Park, Edinburg, United States  Costa Rica
1–0
1–0
2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship
23
11 October 2018  Cuba
9–0
24
17 October 2018 Toyota Stadium, Frisco, United States  Panama
2–2
25
3 March 2019 Catherine Hall Sports Complex, Montego Bay, Jamaica  Chile
1–1
3–2
Friendly
26
2–1
27
7 April 2019 Moses Mabhida Stadium, Johannesburg, South Africa  South Africa
1–1
1–1
28
19 May 2019 National Stadium, Kingston, Jamaica  Panama
1–0
3–1
29
2–0
30
28 May 2019 Hampden Park, Glasgow, Scotland  Scotland
1–0
2–3
31
2–2

Honors

In 2018, Shaw was named Guardian Footballer of the Year, an award given to a footballer "who has done something truly remarkable, whether by overcoming adversity, helping others or setting a sporting example by acting with exceptional honesty."[12]

References

  1. ^ Khadija Shaw at Soccerway
  2. ^ Lesar, Al (4 October 2017). "Soccer allowed Tennessee's Khadija Shaw to escape gang violence in Jamaica". Knox News. Retrieved 30 March 2019.
  3. ^ "2018 SEC Soccer awards announced". www.secsports.com.
  4. ^ "'Bunny' goes pro". Jamaica Observer.
  5. ^ "Florida Krush - 2018 Regular Season - Roster". www.wpslsoccer.com.
  6. ^ "Khadija Shaw rejoint Bordeaux". Girondins.com (in French). 7 June 2019.
  7. ^ "Khadija Shaw signs two-year contract with French club". www.loopjamaica.com.
  8. ^ "Khadija Shaw was born to roll the leather, says her mom". www.loopjamaica.com.
  9. ^ "Jamaica Observer Limited". Jamaica Observer.
  10. ^ "WOMEN'S OLYMPIC QUALIFIER: Reggae Girlz crush Dom Rep 6-0". http://www.jamaicaobserver.com. External link in |website= (help)
  11. ^ "Jamaica qualify for Women's World Cup with help from Bob Marley's daughter". BBC. 18 October 2018.
  12. ^ Graham, Bryan Armen (28 December 2018). "The Guardian footballer of the year 2018: Khadija 'Bunny' Shaw" – via www.theguardian.com.

External links

2012 CONCACAF Women's U-17 Championship

The 2012 CONCACAF Under-17 Women's Championship was the third edition of the U-17 women's championship in football for the CONCACAF region. It was held in Guatemala City from May 2 to 12.

The three best-placed teams qualified for the 2012 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup held in Azerbaijan. Canada were the defending champions from 2010. All matches were played on artificial turf at the Estadio Cementos Progreso.

2012 CONCACAF Women's U-17 Championship squads

This article lists the squads for the 2012 CONCACAF Women's U-17 Championship, to be held in Guatemala. The 8 national teams involved in the tournament were required to register a squad of 20 players; only players in these squads were eligible to take part in the tournament.

Players marked (c) were named as captain for their national squad. Number of caps, players' club teams and players' age as of 1 March 2012 – the tournament's opening day.

2015 CONCACAF Women's U-20 Championship

The 2015 CONCACAF Women's U-20 Championship was the 8th edition of the CONCACAF Women's U-20 Championship, the biennial international youth football championship organised by CONCACAF for the women's under-20 national teams of the North, Central American and Caribbean region. The tournament was hosted by Honduras and took place between 3–13 December 2015, as announced by CONCACAF on 7 May 2015. A total of eight teams played in the tournament.

Same as previous editions, the tournament acted as the CONCACAF qualifiers for the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup. The top three teams qualified for the 2016 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup in Papua New Guinea.The United States won their fifth title overall and fourth in a row with a 1–0 final victory over Canada. Both finalists and third-placed Mexico qualified for the World Cup.

2015 CONCACAF Women's U-20 Championship qualification

The 2015 CONCACAF Women's U-20 Championship qualification was a women's under-20 football competition which decided the participating teams of the 2015 CONCACAF Women's U-20 Championship. Players born on or after 1 January 1996 were eligible to compete in the tournament.A total of eight teams qualified to play in the final tournament, where the berths were allocated to the three regional zones as follows:

Three teams from the North American Zone (NAFU), i.e., Canada, Mexico and the United States, who all qualified automatically

Two teams from the Central American Zone (UNCAF), including Honduras who qualified automatically as hosts

Three teams from the Caribbean Zone (CFU)The top three teams of the final tournament qualified for the 2016 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup in Papua New Guinea.

2016 CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualifying Championship qualification

The 2016 CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualifying Championship qualification was a women's football competition which decided the participating teams of the 2016 CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualifying Championship.

A total of eight teams qualified to play in the final tournament, where the berths were allocated to the three regional zones as follows:

Three teams from the North American Zone (NAFU), i.e., Canada, Mexico and the hosts United States, who all qualified automatically

Two teams from the Central American Zone (UNCAF)

Three teams from the Caribbean Zone (CFU)The top two teams of the final tournament qualified for the 2016 Summer Olympics women's football tournament in Brazil.

2018 CONCACAF Awards

The shortlists for the 2018 CONCACAF Awards were announced on 11 December 2018.

The awards are for performances between 1 January and 10 December 2018. The results were announced on 15 January 2019.

2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship

The 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship was the 10th edition of the CONCACAF Women's Championship (also known as the CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup or the CONCACAF Women's World Cup Qualifying Tournament), the quadrennial international football championship organised by CONCACAF for the women's national teams of the North, Central American and Caribbean region. Eight teams played in the tournament, which took place from 4–17 October in the United States.The tournament served as the CONCACAF qualifiers to the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup in France. The top three teams qualified for the World Cup, while the fourth-placed team advanced to a play-off against the third-placed team from the South American confederation, CONMEBOL. It also determined the CONCACAF teams playing at the 2019 Pan American Games women's football tournament in Lima.The United States were the defending champions of the competition. They successfully defended their title as hosts, winning the final 2–0 against Canada for their 8th CONCACAF Women's Championship title.

2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship qualification

The 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship qualification is a women's football competition which decides the participating teams of the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

A total of eight teams played in the final tournament, which was held in the United States.

2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship squads

The 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship is an upcoming international women's football tournament held in the United States from 4 to 17 October 2018. The eight national teams involved in the tournament are required to register a squad of 20 players, including two goalkeepers. Only players in these squads are eligible to take part in the tournament.

The provisional 35-player squad lists were announced on 10 September 2018. From the preliminary squad, the final list of 20 players per national team will be submitted to CONCACAF 24 hours before each team's first match.

The final 20-player roster (2 must be goalkeepers) for each team was announced by CONCACAF on 26 September 2018. Following this, only injury-related replacements are permitted.The position listed for each player is per the official squad list published by CONCACAF. The age listed for each player is on 4 October 2018, the first day of the tournament. The numbers of caps and goals listed for each player do not include any matches played after the start of tournament. The nationality for each club reflects the national association (not the league) to which the club is affiliated.

2018 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament

The 2018 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament (also known as the 2018 Women's College Cup) will be the 37th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The semifinals and championship game will be played at WakeMed Soccer Park in Cary, North Carolina from November 30 – December 2, 2018 while the preceding rounds will be played at various sites across the country during November 2018.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was the eighth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship contested by 24 women's national teams representing member associations of FIFA. It took place between 7 June and 7 July 2019, with 52 matches staged in nine cities in France, which was awarded the right to host the event in March 2015, the first time the country hosted the tournament. The tournament was the first Women's World Cup to use the video assistant referee (VAR) system.

The United States entered the competition as defending champions after winning the 2015 edition in Canada and successfully defended their title with a 2–0 victory over the Netherlands in the final. In doing so, they secured their record fourth title and became the second nation, after Germany, to have successfully retained the title.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup Group C

Group C of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup took place from 9 to 18 June 2019. The group consisted of Australia, Brazil, Italy and Jamaica. The top two teams, Italy and Australia, along with the third-placed team, Brazil (as one of the four best third-placed teams), advanced to the round of 16.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification process decided all 24 teams which will play in the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup, with the hosts France qualifying automatically. It is the eighth FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football world championship tournament. The tournament is the third to be hosted in Europe, after the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup in Sweden and the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup in Germany.

CONCACAF Awards

The CONCACAF Awards are an association football award given annually to honor players, match officials and coaches from the North American region. It was established in 2013.Players, Coaches and Referees of any nationality are eligible to be nominated, so long as they meet at least one of the following criteria:

1. Have played/coached/refereed in an official CONCACAF tournament at club or national level

2. Have played/coached/refereed for a CONCACAF member national team in a FIFA-sanctioned international competition

3. Have played/coached/refereed in a domestic league within CONCACAF's territory.For each award, an initial shortlist of 20 nominees was established by CONCACAF's 41 Member Associations and CONCACAF competitions' Technical Study Groups.

The final shortlist is voted on by three groups; Member Associations' national team coaches and captains, media, and fans. Each group's votes will provide a third of the total outcome.

FC Girondins de Bordeaux (women)

Football Club des Girondins de Bordeaux (French pronunciation: ​[ʒiʁɔ̃dɛ̃ də bɔʁdo]; commonly referred to as Girondins de Bordeaux or simply Bordeaux) is a French women's football club based in the city of Bordeaux. It has been the women's section of FC Girondins de Bordeaux since 2015. The club currently plays in the Division 1 Féminine, the highest division of women's football in France.

Football at the 2018 Central American and Caribbean Games – Women's team squads

The following is a list of squads for each nation competing in football at the 2018 Central American and Caribbean Games in Barranquilla.

Football at the 2018 Central American and Caribbean Games – Women's tournament

The women's football tournament at the 2018 Central American and Caribbean Games was held in Barranquilla, Colombia from 19 to 30 July.

Hue Menzies

Hue Menzies (born 10 March 1964) is an English-born Jamaican-American former footballer and current manager of the Jamaica women's national team. He also serves as the team's technical director, helping Jamaica qualify for the 2019 edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the first ever Caribbean nation to do so.

Jamaica women's national football team

Jamaica women's national football team is nicknamed the "Reggae Girlz". They are one of the top women's national football teams in the Caribbean region along with Trinidad and Tobago and Haiti. In 2008 the team was disbanded after they failed to get out of the group stage of Olympic Qualifying, which notably featured the United States and Mexico. The program was restarted in 2014 after nearly a six-year hiatus. They finished second at the 2014 Women's Caribbean Cup losing 1–0 against Trinidad and Tobago in the final. The team is backed by ambassador Cedella Marley, the daughter of the late Bob Marley; she aids in raising awareness for the team and encourages development as well as providing for it financially. Jamaica qualified for the FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time ever in 2019, but lost all its matches and left the tournament from the group stage.

Jamaica squads

Languages

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