Keystone B-3

The Keystone B-3A was a bomber aircraft developed for the United States Army Air Corps by Keystone Aircraft in the late 1920s.

B-3A
Keystone B-3A (SN 30-281)
Keystone B-3A (S/N 30-281), the first B-3A built.
Role Light bomber
Manufacturer Keystone Aircraft
Primary user United States Army Air Corps
Number built 63 B-3A/B-5
Variants Keystone B-4
Keystone B-5
Keystone B-6

Design and development

The B-3 was originally ordered as the LB-10A (a single-tail modification of the Keystone LB-6), but the Army dropped the LB- 'light bomber' designation in 1930.

Although the performance of the B-3A was hardly better than that of the bombers flown at the end of World War I, it had come a long way. In terms of its safety, it was far superior to its oldest predecessors.

Operational history

The B-3A was a member of the last family of biplanes operated by the US Army; it remained in service until 1940. A few years after it was first produced, the introduction of all-metal monoplanes rendered it almost completely obsolete.

Variants

LB-10
The last of the 17 LB-6s ordered (S/N 29-27) was converted with a re-designed single fin and rudder and two 525 hp Wright R-1750E engines. Delivered to Wright Field on 7 July 1929, it was wrecked on 12 November 1929.
LB-10A
This version used Pratt and Whitney R-1690-3 Hornet engines and was slightly smaller, in both wingspan and fuselage. A total of 63 were ordered (S/N 30-281/343). All were re-designated as the B-3A before any deliveries were made, with the final 27 built as B-5A with Wright engines.
B-3A
Ordered as LB-10A, 36 delivered as B-3A (S/N 30-281/316). The first aircraft was delivered in October 1930.
B-5A
Ordered as B-3A, re-engined with Wright R-1750-3 Cyclone engines, 27 built (S/N 30-317/343).

Operators

 United States
 Philippines

Specifications (B-3A)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 5
  • Length: 48 ft 10 in (14.9 m)
  • Wingspan: 74 ft 8 in (22.8 m)
  • Height: 15 ft 9 in (4.8 m)
  • Wing area: 1,145 sq ft (106.4 m2)
  • Empty weight: 7,705 lb (3,495 kg)
  • Gross weight: 12,952 lb (5,875 kg)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Pratt & Whitney R-1690-3 radial engines, 525 hp (392 kW) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 114 mph (183 km/h, 98 kn)
  • Cruise speed: 98 mph (158 km/h, 85 kn)
  • Range: 860 mi (1,400 km, 760 nmi)
  • Service ceiling: 12,700 ft (3,870 m)
  • Rate of climb: 530 ft/min (2.7 m/s)
  • Wing loading: 11.31 lb/sq ft (55.42 kg/m2)
  • Power/mass: 0.0811 hp/lb (133 W/kg)

Armament

  • Guns: 3 × .30 in (7.62 mm) machine guns
  • Bombs: 2,500 lb (1,100 kg); 4,000 lb (1,800 kg) on short runs

See also

Related development

Related lists

References

Notes
  1. ^ "Fact Sheet – Keystone B-3A." National Museum of the United States Air Force. Retrieved: 14 July 2017.
Bibliography
  • Andrade, John. U.S. Military Aircraft Designations and Serials since 1909. Leicester, UK: Midland Counties Publications, 1979, pp. 43, 135. ISBN 0-904597-22-9.
  • The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982–1985). London: Orbis Publishing, 1985, p. 2255.
  • Maurer, Maurer. Combat Squadrons of the Air Force, World War II. Maxwell AFB, Alabama: Air Force Historical Studies Office, 1982. ISBN 0-89201-097-5.

External links

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Douglas Y1B-7

The Douglas Y1B-7 was a 1930s United States bomber aircraft. It was the first US monoplane given the B- 'bomber' designation. The monoplane was more practical and less expensive than the biplane, and the United States Army Air Corps chose to experiment with monoplanes for this reason. At the time the XB-7 was ordered, it was being tested by Douglas Aircraft as an observational plane.

Keystone B-4

The Keystone B-4 was a biplane bomber, built by the Keystone Aircraft company for the United States Army Air Corps.

Keystone B-5

The Keystone B-5 is a light bomber made by the Keystone Aircraft company for the United States Army Air Corps in the early 1930s. The B-5A was a Keystone B-3A with Wright Cyclone rather than Pratt & Whitney engines.

Keystone B-6

The Keystone B-6 was a biplane bomber developed by the Keystone Aircraft company for the United States Army Air Corps.

Keystone LB-6

The Keystone LB-6 and LB-7 were 1920s American light bombers, built by the Keystone Aircraft company for the United States Army Air Corps, called Panther by the company, but adoption of the name was rejected by the U.S. Army.

Manufacturer designations
Bombers
Trainers
Patrol aircraft
Observation aircraft
Scout aircraft
USAAS/USAAC/USAAF/USAF bomber designations, Army/Air Force and Tri-Service systems
Original sequences
(1924–1930)
Main sequence
(1930–1962)
Long-range Bomber
(1935–1936)
Non-sequential
Tri-Service sequence
(1962–current)

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