Kevin Sack

Kevin Sack, an American journalist, is a senior reporter for The New York Times.[1]

Sack shared a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 2001 for a New York Times series on race.[2]

While at The Los Angeles Times, he received the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting, with Alan Miller, for their revelatory and moving examination of a military aircraft, nicknamed "The Widow Maker," that was linked to the deaths of 45 pilots.[3]

He was a member of The New York Times reporting team that received the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for coverage of the 2014 Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa.[4] Team members named by The Times were Pam Belluck, Helene Cooper, Sheri Fink, Adam Nossiter, Norimitsu Onishi, Sack, and Ben C. Solomon.[5]

Career

Before joining the Times, Sack was a national correspondent in the Atlanta bureau of The Los Angeles Times, Atlanta bureau chief and correspondent for The New York Times, and a reporter for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.[6]

Education

Sack is a graduate of Duke University, 1981, with a B.A. in history. He attended the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa on a Rotary Foundation fellowship.[7]

References

  1. ^ http://6thfloor.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/12/09/behind-the-cover-story-kevin-sack-on-his-friendship-with-a-lost-boy/
  2. ^ http://www.pulitzer.org/biography/2003-National-Reporting
  3. ^ http://www.pulitzer.org/citation/2003-National-Reporting
  4. ^ http://www.pulitzer.org/works/2015-International-Reporting
  5. ^ https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/04/20/business/media/21pulitzer-winners-finalists.html
  6. ^ http://www.pulitzer.org/biography/2003-National-Reporting
  7. ^ http://www.pulitzer.org/biography/2003-National-Reporting

External links

188th New York State Legislature

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189th New York State Legislature

The 189th New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from January 9, 1991, to December 31, 1992, during the ninth and tenth years of Mario Cuomo's governorship, in Albany.

18th GLAAD Media Awards

18th Annual GLAAD Media Awards (2007) were presented at four separate ceremonies: March 26 in New York City; April 14 in Los Angeles; April 28 in San Francisco; and May 10 in Miami. The awards were presented to honor "fair, accurate and inclusive" representations of gay individuals in the media.

190th New York State Legislature

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191st New York State Legislature

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Charleston church shooting

The Charleston church shooting (also known as the Charleston church massacre) was a mass shooting in which Dylann Roof, a 21-year-old white supremacist, murdered nine African Americans (including the senior pastor, state senator Clementa C. Pinckney) during a prayer service at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in downtown Charleston, South Carolina, on the evening of June 17, 2015. Three other victims survived. The morning after the attack, police arrested Roof in Shelby, North Carolina. Roof confessed to committing the shooting in the hope of igniting a race war. The shooting targeted one of the United States' oldest black churches, which has long been a site for community organization around civil rights.

Roof was found competent to stand trial in federal court, and in December 2016 was convicted of 33 federal hate crime and murder charges stemming from the shooting. On January 10, 2017, he was sentenced to death. Roof was separately charged with nine counts of murder in the South Carolina state courts. In April 2017, Roof pleaded guilty to all nine state charges in order to avoid a second death sentence and was sentenced to life imprisonment for each, clearing the way for his eventual federal execution.Roof espoused racial hatred in both a website manifesto published before the shooting, and a journal written from jail afterwards. Photographs posted on the website showed Roof posing with emblems associated with white supremacy and with photos of the Confederate battle flag. The shooting triggered debate on its modern display, and following the shooting, the South Carolina General Assembly voted to remove the flag from State Capitol grounds.

Until surpassed by the 2017 Sutherland Springs church shooting and the 2018 Pittsburgh synagogue shooting, this was the deadliest mass shooting at an American place of worship, alongside a 1991 attack at a Buddhist temple in Waddell, Arizona.

Ebenezer Baptist Church (Atlanta, Georgia)

Ebenezer Baptist Church is an evangelical Christian Baptist church located in Atlanta, United States, affiliated with the Progressive National Baptist Convention.

Frank W. Hunger

Frank W. Hunger (born July 22, 1936) is an American attorney who served as the United States Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division from 1993 to 1999.

Jamal Nasser

Jamal Nasser (c. 1985 – March 16, 2003) was an Afghan soldier who died in United States' custody at a firebase in Gardez on March 16, 2003.In 2004, eighteen months after his death, when Nasser's death in custody was brought to the attention of American headquarters, his death was attributed to a kidney infection.

Later, an investigation determined that the account of death by natural causes was a fiction, the result of collusion among the GIs in the Special Forces unit who had custody of Nasser when he died. After a two-year investigation, no one was held responsible for his death. Reprimands were filed in the dossiers of several GIs for the failure to report his death.

Knock-and-announce

Knock-and-announce, in United States law criminal procedure, is an ancient common law principle, incorporated into the Fourth Amendment, which requires law enforcement officers to announce their presence and provide residents with an opportunity to open the door prior to a search.

The rule is currently codified in the United States Code, which governs Fourth Amendment searches conducted by the federal government. Most states have similarly codified the rule into their own statutes, and remain free to interpret or augment the rule and its consequences in any fashion that remains consistent with Fourth Amendment principles. A state's knock-and-announce rule will govern searches by state actors pursuant to state-issued warrants, assuming that Federal actors are not extensively involved in the search.

No-knock warrant

In the United States, a no-knock warrant is a warrant issued by a judge that allows law enforcement officers to enter a property without immediate prior notification of the residents, such as by knocking or ringing a doorbell. In most cases, law enforcement will identify themselves just before they forcefully enter the property. It is issued under the belief that any evidence they hope to find can be destroyed during the time that police identify themselves and the time they secure the area, or in the event where there is a large perceived threat to officer safety during the execution of the warrant.

Norimitsu Onishi

Norimitsu Onishi (大西 哲光, Ōnishi Norimitsu) is a Japanese Canadian journalist. He is Southern Africa Bureau Chief for the New York Times.

He was a member of The New York Times reporting team that received the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for coverage of the 2014 Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa. Team members named by The Times were Pam Belluck, Helene Cooper, Sheri Fink, Adam Nossiter, Onishi, Kevin Sack, and Ben C. Solomon.In November 2018, Onishi wrote an article about the lonely deaths of the elderly in Japan, titled "A Generation in Japan Faces a Lonely Death" for which he was nominated as a 2018 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing Finalist. Readers thanked Norimitsu for his "profoundly moving piece" about two people who live alone in a danchi, a sprawling government apartment complex, outside Tokyo.

Pam Belluck

Pam Belluck, an American journalist and author, is a health and science writer for The New York Times and author of the acclaimed nonfiction book Island Practice, which is in development for a television series.

She was a member of The New York Times reporting team that received the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for coverage of the 2014 Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa. Team members named by The Times were Belluck, Helene Cooper, Sheri Fink, Adam Nossiter, Norimitsu Onishi, Kevin Sack, and Ben C. Solomon.

Roger J. Robach

Roger J. Robach (June 21, 1934 – September 29, 1991) was an American politician from New York.

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Serenbe was developed by Steve Nygren who had previously opened a Bed & Breakfast in the area. The name "Serenbe" was his wife Marie's idea, and refers to the serenity of the location.Serenbe's residences consist of single-family houses and row houses. All have front porches, and none have backyards, but rather face on common greenspace and trails. Close proximity to shops and services encourages walking. Architectural styles include Arts and Crafts-style cottages, loft-style townhouses and sleek modern "boxes".The village comprises three hamlets: The Selborne hamlet is devoted to the visual and culinary arts and currently contains the retail shops in Serenbe. The Grange hamlet has an agricultural theme, and the Mado hamlet, focuses on health and healing.

Sheri Fink

Sheri Fink is an American journalist who writes about health, medicine and science.

She received the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting, "for a story that chronicles the urgent life-and-death decisions made by one hospital’s exhausted doctors when they were cut off by the floodwaters of Hurricane Katrina.". She was also a member of The New York Times reporting team that received the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for coverage of the 2014 Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa.

Team members named by The Times were Pam Belluck, Helene Cooper, Fink, Adam Nossiter, Norimitsu Onishi, Kevin Sack, and Ben C. Solomon.As of April 2014, Fink is a staff reporter for The New York Times.

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William Ballard Hoyt II (June 20, 1937 – March 25, 1992) was an American politician from New York.

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Wit (also styled as W;t) is a one-act play written by American playwright Margaret Edson, which won the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. Edson used her work experience in a hospital as part of the inspiration for her play.

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